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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Skin lesions refer to any variation in skin color or texture anywhere on the body. Some skin lesions are present at birth, such as moles, freckles, or birthmarks. Others are acquired over time, such as acne, warts, allergies, sunburn, or abrasions. Most skin lesions are harmless. However, it is important to keep an eye on them because they can change over time, which may be indicative of a serious problem.

The most common forms of skin cancer occurring on the feet are:

 Basal cell carcinoma: Basal Cell Carcinoma frequently is seen on sun-exposed skin surfaces. With feet being significantly less exposed to the sun, it occurs there less often. This form of skin cancer is one of the least aggressive cancers in the body. It will cause local damage but only rarely spreads beyond the skin. Basal cell cancers may appear as pearly white bumps or patches that may ooze or crust and look like an open sore. On the skin of the lower legs and feet, basal cell cancers often resemble non-cancerous skin tumors or benign ulcers. 

Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common form of cancer on the skin of the feet. Most types of early squamous cell carcinoma are confined to the skin and do not spread. However, when advanced, some can become more aggressive and spread throughout the body. This form of cancer often begins as a small scaly bump or plaque, which may appear inflamed. Sometimes there is a history of recurrent cracking or bleeding. Occasionally it begins as a hard projecting callus-like lesion. Though squamous cell cancer is painless, it may be itchy. Squamous cell cancer may resemble a plantar wart, a fungal infection, eczema, an ulcer, or other common skin conditions of the foot.

Malignant Melanoma: Malignant melanoma is one of the deadliest skin cancers known. Non-surgical treatments are rarely effective, and many remain experimental. This type of skin cancer must be detected very early to ensure patient survival. Melanomas may occur on the skin of the feet and on occasion beneath a toenail. They are found both on the soles and on the top of the feet. As a melanoma grows and extends deeper into the skin, it becomes more serious and may spread through the body through the lymphatics and blood vessels.

A condition called actinic keratosis is another cancer-causing lesion that can occur on the feet. It is most commonly found in sun-exposed areas, such as the top of the foot. Treatment consists of freezing the lesions with liquid nitrogen or sharp excision.

Kaposi's Sarcoma is another cancerous lesion that may appear on the soles of the feet of people with HIV infection or AIDS. Kaposi's Sarcoma lesions are irregular in shape and have a purplish, reddish, or bluish-black appearance. They tend to spread and form large plaques or become nodular. The nodular lesions have a firm, rubbery appearance.

For more information aboutskin cancers of the feet, and to learn about the "ABCDs" of melanoma, click on this link, courtesy of the American Podiatric Medical Association.

Just because a lesion has been there for "a long time" or hasn't changed doesn't guarantee that it is benign.  The only way to know for certain is via a biopsy.  Biopsies take just a few minutes, cause very little discomfort and the results can be obtained quickly.  If you are uncertain about the cause of any rash or skin lesion, contact us through the link on our website or call the office at 732-382-3470 to schedule an appointment.  The peace of mind the results can provide is priceless. 

Melanoma of the foot   Basal Cell Carcinoma

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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470