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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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By Clark Podiatry Center
March 12, 2019
Category: Athletic Foot Care

If you’re an athlete, you know from experience that your feet are very important to your performance. Agility and coordination are crucial and making sure your feet continue delivering their best depends on how you treat them. Different activities place different stress on your feet.  Martial arts require quick repetitive movements that strike hard trauma inducing objects, whereas aerobic exercises like gymnastics demand strong cushioning and balance. Team orientated sports like football, baseball, and basketball can strain ankles and knees making stretching very important.

Some of the most common problems athletes experience include:

  • Ankle sprains. With most of a person’s weight placed on each leg, the ankle suffers if it isn’t supported and strengthened.
  • Heel issues. Constant pounding on hard surfaces can cause problems with an athlete’s heel making walking or running very difficult and painful.
  • Stress fractures. Insufficient cushioning can steadily lead to small fissures in a person’s bones.
  • Achilles tendon. The irritation and possible separating of the main tendon at the back of the foot. This is very painful and can end an athletic career.
  • Morton’s neuroma. A hardening of the skin at the ball of an athlete’s foot.

All the above problems can be treated with a little care and attention. First, making sure your feet are well rested and stretched before any performance is important. Stretching will include not just your feet, but other parts of your body as well. Slowly increasing your range of motion is your goal, as is strengthening muscles in and around your feet. Doing so will help absorb the shock and stress often associated with athletic competition keeping you ‘on your toes.’

It is not uncommon to see an athlete bob up and down as he or she pushes his muscles and tendons during a pregame stretch, however this can be very dangerous if they are not careful. Too much bouncing can pull a muscle, just the opposite of what you want. A slow, steady, yet tolerable stretch is best as it extends the muscle but does not strain it.

Stretching is a good habit to get into whether you’re an athlete or not. Doing so when you wake in the morning will get your blood flowing and allow you to start the day more physically and mentally prepared.

If you have any questions about these posts or would like to see the doctor, please make an appointment with us.  Our podiatrist, Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children’s Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.  

Patients are always asking why their ingrown nails keep coming back and why can't they be cut "properly" -- whatever that means--so that the problem never comes back.

Unfortunately, the shape of a toenail can't be changed by cutting it different—straight across, back on an angle or the anachronistic V-shaped notch in the middle of the nail (which has never worked going back to cave-man days). Nails grow straight out toward the tip of the toe.  Ingrown nails are nails which have curled so that the edges can't grow past the skin of the nail groove on the side and poke into the skin. A sharp edge or a poorly trimmed nail can break through the skin in which case an infection can ensue.

In these circumstances, cutting the nail better in the corners can help, but temporarily at best. And if frequent infections are the norm, even small ones, then the best way to deal with the problem is to fix it on a lasting basis by performing an in-office procedure called a matrixectomy. Simply put, this is done by making the nail more narrow on the affected side and then cauterizing the so-called "root" of the nail so that the removed portion does not return at all.

If you'd like to see a video of such a procedure, click on video below.  A word of warning: this is an actual surgical procedure and the contents are graphic in nature.

 

 

This particular patient had a problem with a border of both great toenails. The amount of nail removed is determined by how much the nail curls under. We remove as little as possible, but just the right amount to correct the problem

The process of cauterization takes about 60-90 seconds per nail border. Once again, what we're trying to do is to destroy the nail matrix or "root" of the nail in the area in order to prevent that part of the nail from ever growing back. Numbness from the local anesthetic lasts for a few hours and typically there is little or no need for pain medication afterwards, nothing more than ibuprofen or Tylenol.

We provide a wound care kit to use for postoperative care beginning the next day. The old bandages are removed, the toe is rinsed, dried and a small amount of medication is put into the nail groove and the area covered with a band aid. This is done once or twice per day until healing is complete.

Overall healing time is 2-3 weeks with little or no disability. The procedure is quick, simple and VERY successful at relieving the pain of an ingrown toenail once and for all.

For more information or an appointment, contact us at 732-382-3470 or visit our website at www.clarkpodiatry.com.  

At Clark Podiatry Center, we want to keep you walking! 

 
By Clark Podiatry Center
March 05, 2019
Category: Heel pain
Tags: x-ray   Flat Feet   Plantar Fasciitis   Orthotics   Shoes   stretch   MRI  

The foot is one of the most complicated parts of the human body. With 19 separate muscles, 26 bones, 33 joints, and at least 107 ligaments and tendons, it is easy to see why taking care of your feet is very important. One of the common ailments many people experience is called Plantar fasciitis, a painful inflammation of connective tissue that runs across the bottom of the foot connecting the heel bone to the rest of the foot.  Plantar Fasciitis is commonly experienced by people whose feet constantly pound hard, flat surfaces and are often caused by Heel Spurs or bony protrusions of calcium on the heel.

Risk Factors for Plantar Fasciitis

  • Age - Between the ages of 40 and 60.
  • Diabetes
  • Exercise -  Activities that put a lot of stress on your heel - long-distance running, jumping activities, basketball, ballet, and aerobic dance.
  • Foot mechanics - Having flat feet, a high arch or an abnormal pattern of walking that distributes weight unevenly on the foot.
  • Obesity - Being overweight.
  • Occupation - Factory workers, teachers, construction workers, athletes, nurses and others who walk or stand a lot on hard surfaces.

Some of the ways to avoid Plantar Fasciitis

  • Lose weight.
  • Always wear appropriate athletic shoes.
  • Wear shoes that are supportive, have good arch support and absorb shock well.
  • Stretch and warm up before exercising.
  • See your doctor if you suspect you have Plantar Fasciitis.

If you do see your doctor, there are several ways to treat the ailment depending on the severity of the inflammation. They include:

  • Examination- Physical examination of the inflamed site.
  • X-Ray or MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) to see if there is a damaged nerve or fracture.
  • Ultrasound
  • Medicine - Doctor prescribed mostly over the counter pain meds.
  • Stretching - ligaments, tendons, and muscles before exercise especially.  
  • Therapy -  Physical Therapy, Night Splints and the use of Orthotics.
  • Surgery - At times this may be necessary if other methods are not successful.

If you have any questions or would like to see a podiatrist, please make an appointment with our friendly staff. Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470. If you have concerns with your children’s feet, Dr. Macy specializes in pediatrics and can assess your children’s feet at New Jersey Children’s Foot Health Institute.

By Clark Podiatry Center
February 26, 2019
Category: Heel pain

Sore soles at the end of a long day of standing or walking; burning or tingling pain when you get out of bed in the morning; pain at the base of your heel. These are all symptoms associated with plantar fasciitis foot pain. While it might not be completely debilitating, it can definitely cause extreme discomfort and cause your whole body to feel tired.

Those who suffer from chronic plantar fasciitis pain know the uncomfortable feeling. The soreness of the feet can ruin plans for the evening or prevent you from wanting to be active. That’s why they might also know that prevention is the key to reduce the risk of experiencing pain each day (and night).

Here are a few ways to prevent or treat mild foot pain before it gets worse:

  • Cushioned shoes with arch and heel support.
  • RICE method – Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation after a long day. This will help prevent symptoms from developing when you take your shoes off and relax. Tip: freeze some water bottles and use them to apply ice and massage your feet.
  • Foot massagers: there are several different types you can use, such as a golf ball, lacrosse ball, foot rollers, an automatic foot massager, or a foot soak with massagers built in. Finally, there’s the tried and true partner foot massage, if available.
  • Exercises to prevent plantar fasciitis pain: 1. Calf stretches like pulling your toes toward you when you have your feet stretched in front of you. 2. Low squat with the heels down to stretch the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia. 3. Point and flex the feet whenever you’re sitting at your desk or watching TV.

If you know that you’ve worked your feet harder than usual, perhaps during a hike or a difficult workout, try some of the above tips to prevent painful symptoms from settling in. If you’re familiar with chronic plantar fasciitis pain, you may also need to use NSAIDs to prevent inflammation of the ligament.

Need help with chronic severe plantar fasciitis pain? See our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet and find the best treatment for any concern you may have. Make an appointment at our Clark, NJ office so we can keep you walking.

By Clark Podiatry Center
February 18, 2019
Category: warts
Tags: Plantar Warts   warts   basic foot care  

As children learn to share with their siblings and friends, they can get good at sharing a lot of things – including germs. This includes everything from the common cold to fungal and viral skin infections, like – you guessed it – warts.

The virus that causes warts only needs is a small opening in the skin, such as a scratch or cut. Then, warts spread easily from one area of the skin to another, and also from person to person, just by skin contact with the wart. The virus causes rapid skin growth in the infected area, which causes the bumpy growth.

Warts are usually harmless and painless but can be embarrassing and bothersome, especially when they are on the feet. Plantar warts can become hard and make it feel like you are walking with a pebble in your shoe.

If your child has one or more plantar warts, you can treat them with:

  • A Salicylic Acid wart treatment (over the counter)
  • Cryotherapy (over the counter options are available, or with a stronger solution at your doctor’s office)
  • Surgical removal (by your doctor)

You can reduce the risk of infection and spreading warts with the following tips:

  • Basic foot care – Help your children wash their feet each night. This can help reduce the germs that might cause infection. You should also check for cuts and scrapes since that’s the way that viruses can infect the skin.
  • Try not to let your children be barefoot in public areas – if they will be barefoot, make sure to wash and dry feet shortly after.
  • Do not allow children to share shoes, socks, or towels.
  • Keep your child from picking at warts, as they can spread to other parts of the body.
  • If someone in the home has warts, treat them right away.

If your child has persistent plantar warts that just won’t go away even with treatment, see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your child’s feet at New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute and find the best treatment for your child’s feet. Make an appointment at our Clark, NJ office so we can keep your child walking.





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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470