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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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By Clark Podiatry Center
May 08, 2019
Category: Foot Pain

When it comes to having healthy feet, besides regularly seeing your podiatrist, you may want to take a few minutes to give them a good massage. This would be especially rewarding after a long day at work or athletic activity. You don’t have to be a professional masseuse to make your feet feel better. This you can do on your own and in your home.

You can break foot massages down into two categories:

  • Wet Massage – massaging your feet after you’ve soaked your feet in a combination of warm water and Epsom salt for about 20 minutes.
  • Dry Massage – Massaging your feet without soaking in warm water.

While you can massage your feet without a good soak, soaking will loosen up the muscles and help alleviate any pain you may be suffering. Make sure you dry your feet well before massaging though.

How to Give a good foot massage:

  • Start by rubbing the soles of your feet.
  • Focus on anything that feels tight or feels good when you rub.
  • Rub from your heel to the ball of the foot.
  • Stretch out your toes and ankles but wiggling them back and forth.
  • Rub the tops, sides and bottom of your toes to get the blood flowing.
  • Squeeze your heel and top side of your foot. Work to loosen the muscle and improve blood flow.
  • Also remember to rub the muscles in your arch.  
  • Focus on the bones of the foot by rubbing between them with a firm circular motion.
  • Repeat the above for any areas that felt especially good.

This is also a good time for a ‘foot checkup’ checking for corns, calluses, bunions, areas of soreness, trimming of nails or other concerns etc.  When finished, feel free to rub in skin lotion or powdered corn silk.

If you have foot concerns or just want to ask questions about your feet, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
May 01, 2019

Choosing the right Orthotics for a child can be much more important than for an adult. A child’s orthotic will guide the proper growth of their feet for the rest of their lives and help with the proper alignment of the ankle, knees, hips and lower back, hopefully eliminating the need for one when they are older.

Of course, not all children’s feet will need an orthotic because their feet are growing. By age 5 or 6, if a child has not developed an arch or is having other problems, call your podiatrist. They will diagnose the problem and, if needed, make sure their feet are appropriately matched with the correct orthotic.

Common reasons for an orthotic include:

  • Over pronation – when your feet tilt inward. Can lead to shin splints, stress fractures and a collapsed arch.
  • Supination – when your feet tilt toward the outside. Can lead to stress fractures.
  • Flat feet – No arch.
  • High arch – Is not usually not supported in a regular shoe.

Each of the above conditions requires a different type of orthotic. The 3 main types are:

  • Rigid – controls the motion of the foot with some arch support
  • Semi-rigid – a less stiff orthotic that will provide more cushioning than a rigid orthotic yet provides good arch support
  • Soft or cushioned – an orthotic that provides cushioning and shock absorption

With supination and pronation usually comes some type of pain that will indicate a problem, but not all pain of course will be eliminated with an orthotic. Other unseen issues may be contributing to your child’s foot pain making it all the more important to make an appointment to see your podiatrist. 

If you believe your child may need an orthotic, or you have any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to make sure your child’s feet are corrected and back on track to a healthy, active and productive life. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
April 24, 2019
Category: Orthotics

There are many reasons to wear an orthotic, depending on the type of foot problem you may have.

Reasons to wear an orthotic include:

  • Flat feet – low arches
  • Supination – an outward roll of the foot when stepping
  • Overpronation – inward roll of the foot when taking a step
  • Diabetes – lack of insulin in your bloodstream
  • Shin splints – painful swelling of the shin from repeated pounding on hard surfaces
  • Morton’s neuroma – tingling in your forefoot caused by damaged nerve
  • Metatarsalgia – pain in the ball of your foot
  • Heel spurs – painful swelling of the heel usually caused by a buildup of calcium
  • Morton’s toe – where your second toe is longer than your big toe
  • Plantar Fasciitis – the inflammation of the bottom of your foot

In each of the above cases, a specific orthotic can be of great help. Many orthotics provide much needed extra cushioning for such conditions as diabetes, shin splints or flat feet, yet each provides cushioning different from the other. Those suffering from diabetes need a softer orthotic, whereas shin splints need cushioning that will absorb the shock of pounding feet. Flat feet, however, need greater support in the arch. Each condition requires knowledge about your specific foot problem. While there are many orthotics or insoles on the market, the best resource for this is your podiatrist who will diagnose your exact condition and determine just what orthotic is best for you.

Basic types of orthotics:

  • Semi-rigid – more flexible orthotic providing cushioning without a lot of arch support
  • Rigid – a stiffer orthotic that is considered aggressive support often used for arches.

Other types of orthotics may include athletic, gel, heat moldable, high heel, children’s and memory foam. Each treat different types of problems so just getting a basic insole is not enough. Your foot has a specific need and must have a specific type of orthotic. The best person to determine what your foot requires is your podiatrist.

If you believe you need an orthotic or have any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
April 17, 2019
Category: bone health

With Spring here, physical activity will be on the rise especially for your children. With this comes the possibility of strains and injuries especially to a child’s feet. Much of this will depend on just how strong their bones are, a critical issue for foot health, but how do we ensure their bones are in the best shape?

One of the most important factors in good bone health is maintaining proper levels of Vitamin D which is created by the skin when exposed to the sun, one more reason to put down those smart phones and video game controllers and get outside.

Factors that Interfere with bone health include:

  • Testosterone or estrogen deficiency – Both help in the development of strong bones. A blood test can help determine this.
  • Proper nutrition – eating the right foods rich in Vitamin D and calcium.
  • Obesity – excessive weight will weaken and stress bones.
  • Genetics – tendencies passed on from parents or grandparents.
  • Continued exercise especially with women – this can stop the menstrual cycle and the production of much needed estrogen.
  • Some medications – see your podiatrist for this.

It is in childhood and adolescence where bones growth wider, longer and denser. Making sure your child has enough Vitamin D and calcium in their diet is very important. Maintaining good eating habits early on will also be of great help. Keeping foods rich with Vitamin D and calcium around the house will help. Most milk, infant formula and many cereals are fortified with Vitamin D while such foods as nuts, leafy greens and fish are rich in calcium, a mineral the body cannot produce but is crucial for bone growth. 

It is recommended that infants receive 400 IU or international units of Vitamin D each day and 600 IU for children and adolescents. Children with darker skin, are obese, have little exposure to sun or suffer from specific medical conditions are prone to Vitamin D deficiencies. Children low in Vitamin D and calcium may have decreased bone mass which can be determined by your podiatrist with an x-ray called a DXA scan.

If you are concerned about your child’s bone health or have any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
April 09, 2019

It probably won’t be a surprise to you that much of a child’s foot health is inherited. High or no arches, tendencies to walk bow legged or the development of calluses are just some of what a child can expect if their parents suffered from the same. One common malady, however, is something called Severs Disease. Also known as Calcaneal apophysitis, Severs Disease is the inflammation of the growth plate in the heel of growing and active children. Severs disease causes pain and a slight swelling around the heel making it difficult to walk or run.

Treating Severs disease includes the following:

  • Reduce activities – Have your child immediately refrain from any activity that causes heel pain.
  • Ice – apply ice to the heel for 20 minutes 3 times a day.
  • Orthotics – children with high arches, no arch, or bowlegs an orthotic may be needed to alleviate the stress on the heel. See your podiatrist for this.
  • Short leg casts – in more dramatic cases children may need to have a short leg cast to temporarily rest the Achilles heel.
  • Shoes – wearing more elevated and cushioning shoes.
  • Stretching – stretching the Achilles tendon can loosen the affected area.
  • Pain meds – using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain medications like ibuprofen and naproxen can help. Male sure to only use as directed and see your podiatrist if you have any questions.

As long as the treatment works, your child can go back to their active self. It is not uncommon, though, for the malady to return unless long term care such as the above is taken. Some of the sports which would be prone to this are running, basketball, tennis and gymnastics, but any activity that requires pounding their feet on a hard surface can induce Severs.

If you or your child has heel pain or any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.





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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470