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Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: surgery

By Clark Podiatry Center
September 25, 2019
Category: fungal toenails
Tags: diabetes   Toenail Fungus   surgery   podiatrist  

Of the many conditions a person can have regarding their feet, one often ignored is toenail fungus. Maybe because it is such a basic problem that it is often considered normal. But having toenail fungus is certainly not a normal, or at least, a healthy condition as it can easily lead to athlete’s foot. So, what is toenail fungus and what does it look like?  Called onychomycosis, toenail fungus is a fungal infection of your toenails and nail bed. If it spreads to your toes, it becomes athlete’s foot or tinea pedis.

Symptoms of toenail fungus include:

  • Thickened nails – unusual thickness
  • Crumbly nails – toward the edges of the nails
  • Distorted shape – can grow to one side or the other
  • Bad smell – due to fungus
  • Dark color under the nail – from the buildup of the fungus

Causes of toenail fungus include:

  • Sweaty feet – moisture breeds fungus
  • Age – the older a person is, the more likely they are to have poor circulation and the buildup of fungus
  • Walking barefoot in public places – must wear sandals or flipflops to avoid infection
  • Sharing towels, socks and footwear – can spread disease
  • Diabetes – loss of sensation can help nurture fungus
  • Skin conditions like psoriasis – can contribute to fungus

If you have any of the above symptoms, you need to see your podiatrist who will test your feet for a fungus and treat appropriately. Some fungal infections are very stubborn and take time to be completely removed.

Treatments include:

  • Oral anti-fungal – such as Sporanox – can take 12 weeks to work
  • Anti-fungal nail polish or lacquer – applied to the nail. May have to be used for a year.
  • Anti-fungal nail cream – must be used on the nail and skin surrounding it
  • Oral anti-fungal – can be taken in pill form
  • Surgery – in the most severe cases, the entire nail may need to be removed and medication applied after

Need some more help and encouragement in caring for your feet or choosing the right shoes schedule an appointment with Clark Podiatry Center to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon A. Macy. He can assess your feet to ensure that there are no issues making sure that you not only choose the right shoes, but also keep your feet healthy. Come see us at our Clark, New Jersey office today!

By Clark Podiatry Center
January 07, 2019
Category: foot deformities

If you have toe deformities, chances are, your parents or their parents had them too. Many foot issues are inherited, and that includes digital deformities like bunions, hammertoes, mallet toes, claw toes, as well as overlapping and underlapping toes.

So, should you be worried about passing toe deformities on to your children?

While there’s a good chance that you might pass on your toe problems through your genes, the good news is that there are ways to treat them.

  • Bunion – A bunion is characterized by a bony growth from the side of the big toe joint, which, in turn, causes the big toe to point toward the other smaller toes. The bony spur can also develop on the outside of the pinky toe.  
  • Claw Toe – When you’ve got nerve damage in your toes, it can cause the joints in your toes to become weak. The joint at the base of the toe bends upward, while the rest of the toe slumps downward. It makes the toes look like it’s clawing the ground.
  • Hammertoes – When the middle toe joint bends upward, making the toe’s shape look like an upside-down “V” that is called a hammertoe. It occurs because there is an imbalance in the muscles, tendons, or the ligaments of the feet.
  • Mallet Toes – An additional deformity due to an imbalance of the muscles, tendons, or the ligaments of the feet is characterized by the toe joint closest to the toenail bending upward called mallet toes.
  • Overlapping or underlapping toes – In some cases, the conditions exist from birth. The smaller toes are usually the ones affected. The muscles, tendons, ligaments, or bones are misaligned.

In most cases, these toe deformities are treatable, especially when detected early. Some treatment options include:

  • Toe Exercises – For some mild cases of toe deformity issues, strengthening the soft tissues around toes can help the toes regain their form.
  • Taping – In the cases where the soft tissues just need a little help, taping the toes can help straighten them out.
  • Splinting – If the toes are in bad form, they may be interfering with certain activities. Splinting them can help them become stronger while keeping them in good shape.
  • Surgery – When non-invasive remedies don’t work, and the toe deformities are severe, it may be necessary to set the bones and/or loosen the tendons or ligaments that might be causing the toe deformity.

So if you’ve got toe deformities, don’t fret! Come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet, and find the best treatment for your toe problems. Make an appointment at our Clark, NJ office so we can keep you walking.

 

Our last blog post was about how problems regarding inflammation of the Achilles tendon, called Achilles Tendonitis, come about. For those who experience symptoms of pain from Achilles tendonitis, we’ve got your back (of the heel)!  Read on for options for treatment, as well as means of prevention.

Ways to treat symptoms of pain and inflammation:

  • A foot and ankle massage can relieve tightness and painful symptoms. You can use a bottle or foam roller for massaging the lower calf.
  • Apply a cold compress or ice to the area for very painful moments.
  • NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), such as Ibuprofen or naproxen can mitigate pain and swelling.
  • Physical Therapy, including stretching and strengthening exercises, can help to prevent worsening issues, such as small tears or ruptures.
  • Over-the-counter or custom orthotics can provide support to weakened ankles. It can also prevent worsening symptoms due to excessive strain.
  • Wear a boot to restrict further movement and therefore, irritation to the tendon.
  • Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) is a non-invasive therapy for Achilles tendonitis.

However, the best way to deal with Achilles tendonitis is to prevent symptoms in the first place. Here are some ways to prevent symptoms:

  • Stretch the calf muscles in the morning and evening, and before and after a workout.
  • Strengthen the calf muscles to reduce strain on the back of the heels.
  • Use cushioned shoes when participating in high impact sports and activities. When weightlifting, use shoes with a small raised heel and heel cups to stabilize the feet.
  • Take it easy when increasing your intensity or volume of your workout because going too fast too hard can cause an Achilles injury.

If home treatments have not helped and there are no other options, surgery may be required. To figure out your best treatment option is to make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet and give them the treatment or orthotic support they need. Come see him at our Clark, NJ office.

By Clark Podiatry Center
January 10, 2018

As children’s bodies continue to grow, they may also develop issues that cause them pain. However, keep in mind that growing pains are not normal when it comes to feet. Any foot or ankle issues that they may experience indicate a foot problem that must be addressed to prevent further complications.

For the most part, children may grow out of certain conditions such as bow legs, flat feet, and in-toeing. Still, it’s important to come see our podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy, at The New Jersey Children’s Foot Health Institute as soon as they complain or seem to show signs of foot pain. Treating a problem early and using prevention methods are easier than trying to solve problems later, as they can become more complex and even require more invasive treatments, such as surgery.

A commonly prescribed treatment for children with foot problems is custom orthotics. They come in all shapes and sizes, and for mild symptoms, even over-the-counter inserts can be helpful. Dr. Macy can help you determine the best type of orthotics for your child’s needs.

In general, orthotics can be useful to relieve symptoms associated with:

  • Flat Feet: When the arches in the feet do not develop after learning to walk, children can experience pain along the bottom of the feet as the tendons and muscles around the arches strain to support the feet. Some children can “grow out of it” and develop arches later, but they should get supportive orthotics to relieve pain.
  • Overpronation: Often associated with flat feet, this is a condition in which the ankle bones tend to lean inward. This can cause strain on the ankle joints and heels as they grow out of alignment. Orthotics can help to support the feet and prevent the ankles from rolling inward.
  • Sever’s Disease (heel pain): This disease affects the growth plate at the base of the heel bone. It can be caused by repetitive stress or injury to the bottom of the foot, and is usually more common in active children. Orthotics can help displace the pressure placed on the growth plate to reduce inflammation and irritation.
  • Osgood Schlatters (knee pain): A painful bump below the kneecap can indicate inflammation to the knee, especially in children who run and jump and are experiencing growth spurts. Orthotics can be used to reduce the impact on the knees and relieve pain.

Is your child overpronating or complaining of foot or ankle pain? It’s important that their needs are addressed to prevent complications as they grow. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy can assess your children’s feet and give them the treatment or orthotic support they need. Come see him at Clark Podiatry Center. Make an appointment to see us today at our Clark, NJ office.

By Clark Podiatry Center
December 18, 2017

When it comes to women’s foot problems, both genetics and fashion play major roles. It also accounts for why women seem to have more foot and ankles issues than men do. One such problem that affects women more than men is Haglund’s Deformity, also known as retrocalcaneal bursitis.

Commonly called “pump bump”, it is a condition characterized by a painful enlargement of the back of the heel bone. The irritation caused on the back of the heel bone results in a bony growth, which in turn can also cause inflammation of the bursa (fluid-filled sac meant to cushion against friction bones or joints). It can cause redness, pain, and swelling at the back of the heel.

Those with high arches, tight Achilles tendons, and/or a tendency to walk on the outside of the heel are more likely to develop this deformity. Shoes with a rigid back, like those in pumps (high heels, no strap, and cupped heels) can cause further irritation on the back of the heel. It’s often accompanied by blisters from where the shoe repeatedly rubs on the back of the heel.

Treatment options:

  • Heel pads, whether it be over-the-counter or custom orthotics, can help to reduce irritation to the back of the heel. Other inserts can also help to correct your gait or add support for high arches or a tight Achilles tendon.
  • Our podiatrist may also suggest topical or oral anti-inflammatory medications for relief as you get the symptoms under control.
  • Physical therapy might also be helpful to loosen tight heel cords.
  • If the symptoms are severe, our podiatrist might recommend immobilization in a brace or cast until symptoms subside.

If after you have tried non-surgical treatments and you are still suffering, or if an X-ray shows significant bony growth, our podiatrist may suggest surgery. However, this requires extensive recovery efforts, so it would be a last resort. Come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy to receive an assessment of your heel pain. Make an appointment today at Clark Podiatry Center to see us at our Clark, NJ office. We keep you walking.

 



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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470