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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: stretch

By Clark Podiatry Center
June 05, 2019
Tags: blisters   fungus   ingrown toenails   Bunions   Hammertoes   stretch   callus   corn   podiatrist   ballet   black nails  

Dancing is one of man’s oldest activities. Either as a celebration or entertainment, dance has been around for many years. Some historical records show dance as an active part of a human culture dating as far back as 3300 B.C. in India and Egypt. Just where and when it began is unknown, but it would not be unusual to imagine ancient man celebrating a successful hunt with a ‘dance’ around the communal campfire millions of years ago.

One type of modern dance that is still popular today is ballet. Ballet dancing includes, music, costumes and stage scenery and is usually done on the dancer’s toes. Because of this, ballet dancing can take a heavy toll on a dancer’s feet.

Some of the foot problems ballet dancers experience include:

  • Blisters – a sore on your foot filled liquid. Some can be popped while others should be left to heal on their own
  • Bunions – a deformity at the base of the big toe
  • Hammertoes – where the toe is buckled up at a joint
  • Callus – the development of a thick and hard layer of skin often over the ball of the foot, heel or outer edge of the big toe
  • Corn – smaller thickening layer of skin with a soft core
  • Black nails – bruising or bleeding under the nail
  • Ingrown toenails – where the sides of the nail grow into the nail groove

Basic Footcare for Ballet:

  • Alternate shoes – changing the shoes you perform in will allow them to dry and help prevent the growth of foot disease causing fungus
  • Moisturize your feet
  • Wear padding to help support your toes
  • Proper fitting ballet shoes – see a ballet store to determine if your ballet shoes fit properly
  • Stretch your feet when not dancing
  • See your podiatrist – regular visits to your podiatrist will help maintain foot health especially with all the stress and potential for foot problems that can come with ballet

Like any sport or activity, ballet requires dedication and hard work. Keeping in shape is very important to be your best when it comes to ballet. This applies especially to your feet.

If you or your children are considering ballet or have any foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

If your child’s heel hurts, they may be suffering from something called Sever’s Disease. Severs Disease, or Calcaneal apophysitis, is a condition that includes the painful swelling of their foot’s growth plate. Sever’s Disease is something more apt to be found in children. The pain will most likely emanate from the soft cartilage that lays next to the heel bone where much of the child’s foot growth occurs. Damage to this part of the foot can develop into something much more pronounced and painful over time if not corrected. The best person to diagnose Sever’s Disease is your podiatrist who should be consulted if your child is suffering from any type of heel pain.

Signs of Sever’s Disease include:

  • Pain and Redness in the heel
  • Foot Stiffness upon waking
  • Limping or walking on tiptoes to avoid pressure on the heel
  • Swelling

Often developed during puberty, Sever’s Disease can be caused by the rapid and uneven growth of foot bones, ligaments, tendons and muscles resulting in the distortion of the growth plate.

Candidates for Sever’s Disease include:

  • Athletes whose feet often hit a hard surface like in basketball, tennis, running and gymnastics
  • Anyone ages 9 to 16
  • Anyone who does a lot of standing

Treating Sever’s Disease includes:

  • Ice – Apply ice every 1 to 2 hours for 15 minutes at a time
  • Pain medicine – use Tylenol and only as directed on the bottle. If you are unsure of the dose, speak to your podiatrist
  • Orthotics - Wear specially designed foot supports to take stress off heel
  • Well-fitting shoes – choose footwear that is well cushioned and/or is open in the back to alleviate pressure on the heel
  • Physical therapy – see a physical therapist to strengthen your feet especially near the heel
  • Foot cast – as determined by your podiatrist
  • Activity change – change or reduce the amount of activity that led to the condition
  • Stretch – stretch your foot muscles before any activity
  • Lose weight – obesity can also contribute to Sever’s Disease

With appropriate treatment, most patients will resume activities in 2 weeks to 2 months.

Do you suspect your child may has Sever’s Disease or any other foot concerns schedule an appointment with Clark Podiatry Center to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon A. Macy who is  associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute . Come see us at our Clark, New Jersey office today!

By Clark Podiatry Center
March 05, 2019
Category: Heel pain
Tags: x-ray   Flat Feet   Plantar Fasciitis   Orthotics   Shoes   stretch   MRI  

The foot is one of the most complicated parts of the human body. With 19 separate muscles, 26 bones, 33 joints, and at least 107 ligaments and tendons, it is easy to see why taking care of your feet is very important. One of the common ailments many people experience is called Plantar fasciitis, a painful inflammation of connective tissue that runs across the bottom of the foot connecting the heel bone to the rest of the foot.  Plantar Fasciitis is commonly experienced by people whose feet constantly pound hard, flat surfaces and are often caused by Heel Spurs or bony protrusions of calcium on the heel.

Risk Factors for Plantar Fasciitis

  • Age - Between the ages of 40 and 60.
  • Diabetes
  • Exercise -  Activities that put a lot of stress on your heel - long-distance running, jumping activities, basketball, ballet, and aerobic dance.
  • Foot mechanics - Having flat feet, a high arch or an abnormal pattern of walking that distributes weight unevenly on the foot.
  • Obesity - Being overweight.
  • Occupation - Factory workers, teachers, construction workers, athletes, nurses and others who walk or stand a lot on hard surfaces.

Some of the ways to avoid Plantar Fasciitis

  • Lose weight.
  • Always wear appropriate athletic shoes.
  • Wear shoes that are supportive, have good arch support and absorb shock well.
  • Stretch and warm up before exercising.
  • See your doctor if you suspect you have Plantar Fasciitis.

If you do see your doctor, there are several ways to treat the ailment depending on the severity of the inflammation. They include:

  • Examination- Physical examination of the inflamed site.
  • X-Ray or MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) to see if there is a damaged nerve or fracture.
  • Ultrasound
  • Medicine - Doctor prescribed mostly over the counter pain meds.
  • Stretching - ligaments, tendons, and muscles before exercise especially.  
  • Therapy -  Physical Therapy, Night Splints and the use of Orthotics.
  • Surgery - At times this may be necessary if other methods are not successful.

If you have any questions or would like to see a podiatrist, please make an appointment with our friendly staff. Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470. If you have concerns with your children’s feet, Dr. Macy specializes in pediatrics and can assess your children’s feet at New Jersey Children’s Foot Health Institute.

By Clark Podiatry Center
January 23, 2019
Category: Exercise
Tags: stretch   workout   walk   comfortable shoes  

Have you been keeping up with your New Year’s Resolutions to be healthier this year? One way you can do that is to stay active and eat nutritious foods!

You might argue that:

  • You don’t have enough time to fit in a gym workout every day.
  • You’re too tired to exercise after a long day and commute home.
  • You lack the motivation to keep up an exercise routine.

Well, we are here to help you remedy that! We’ve got many ideas on how you can increase your physical activity where you spend many hours in your day. That’s right, you can add to your step count right at work!

Here are some sneaky ways to increase your energy output, where you might normally feel like you’re at an idle desk job:

  • Park at the other end of the parking lot, or get off the bus or subway one or two stops earlier.
  • Schedule water breaks. Set an alarm every hour (or more often if you plan to drink smaller amounts) to get a cup of water. Not only will you be sitting less all day, but you’ll also increase your step count AND meet your daily hydration goals. As an added bonus, the increased water intake will also prompt you to take more bathroom breaks as well! (Hint: take the long way to the kitchen or bathroom!)
  • Walk during your lunch. Pick up food at a restaurant down the street, make some phone calls as you walk, run an errand, or just take a walk at a nearby park during your lunch break. If you plan well enough, you may be able to eat while you work, so that your lunch break can be better utilized. (Hint: form a walking group and bring comfortable walking shoes to wear during your longer walks).
  • Carry your “instant” message to your coworker instead of sending a chat or ping. That may sound so foreign and inefficient, but that’s not the goal here. Our goal is to add steps, remember? Bonus points if your coworker is not on the same floor with you and you take the stairs rather than the elevator.
  • Stand up, stretch, and walk in place every 30 minutes to an hour. This will help increase your circulation and encourage an energy spike. Your posture will probably benefit too!

All of these little tricks can help you increase your activity and help you stay focused and alert! It’s a win-win situation at work!

If getting up so often is not appealing or might be distracting to co-workers or your boss, get some exercise by doing some toe exercises under the desk. If nothing else, it will help you strengthen your feet, ankles, and toes, as well as increase circulation. It’s especially important if you’re prone to swollen feet if you stay sitting for a long time. (We’re hinting at you, pregnant ladies!)

By Clark Podiatry Center
November 27, 2018
Category: Exercise
Tags: swelling   stretch   compression socks  

Got a long flight coming up? Got kids going with you? You might prepare for it by testing out neck pillows, noise-canceling headphones, and maybe some eye masks. But what will you do to make the flight more comfortable for the feet?

Here are some foot-related items you could test out:

  • Compression socks - to promote circulation and reduce swelling.
  • Disposable slippers or flip-flops – Unless you’re used to it, you might not want to be seated with your shoes on the whole flight, which could be 10+ hours. (Hint: ask your airline if they will give you disposable slippers!).
  • Footrest or hammock – there are a few products out there for people who want to rest their feet higher than the floor. Many folks with short legs (like your children) might be more comfortable if they can prop their feet up.

More importantly, however, you and your children should try to keep your feet active as much as possible throughout the flight. Why? That’s because the long period of inactivity (in an upright position) can cause your feet to be uncomfortable due to low circulation. When you do get up, your feet might not fit as comfortably into your shoes, and you might even feel some numbness or tingling. In rare cases, it can also lead to blood clots, especially if you are prone to them.

Here are some of the foot-related activities you can do on a long haul flight.

  • Drink a lot of water and go to the bathroom. Hydration is helpful for circulation. It also makes you want to go to the bathroom more, which gets you up and out of your seat more. Make sure you have your children drink water every time you do.
  • Gone to the bathroom? Great! Use it as an excuse to spread and stretch. Walk up and down the aisle and get moving!
  • Draw circles with your toes. Rotate at the ankle and make them larger or smaller as you go. It will also help you with some stretching, pointing and flexing your feet.
  • Scrunch your toes, hold, and then spread them wide, hold. This exercise will wake up many tendons and ligaments in your feet and engage the whole foot!
  • Try some toeholds if you have space. While sitting, trying bringing your knees up (engaging your abs) so that you can reach your feet. Gently pull your toes back and stretch the plantar fascia and your Achilles tendon.
  • Finally, conduct an orchestra with your feet. It’s a great movement for your feet and ankles.

Which of these exercises were you and your children able to do? If you noticed any pain or problems with your feet while doing these movements on board, come to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy. He can assess your feet, and find a solution to treat your pain. Come to see him at Clark Podiatry Center. Make an appointment at our Clark, NJ office so we can keep you walking



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Call Today 732-382-3470

1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470