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Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: orthotic

By Clark Podiatry Center
August 29, 2018
Category: Shoes

An important aspect of foot care is to make sure that you have good shoe habits. That includes long-term shoe maintenance and wearing them properly so that they provide maximum support to your feet.

Here are some habits you should adopt, as well as some habits you should drop!

DOs:

  • Keep your shoes clean, which includes keeping your feet clean. This will help prevent the growth of microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi that could rot your shoes and make them smell! You might use a shoe spray or an activated charcoal bag to absorb moisture if your feet tend to sweat a lot. Additionally, keeping them clean of dirt (and in the winter, of rock salt) can reduce the rate at which they degrade.
  • Wear socks with shoes, especially closed-toe shoes. You are more likely to have bacterial or fungal growth/infection without socks to absorb some of the moisture from your feet. Got hyperhidrosis? You may want to bring an extra pair of socks with you to change into midday.
  • Unlace your shoes before taking them off to reduce wear and tear on the materials that make up the structure of your shoe. Overstretching the material can reduce the supportiveness of the shoes and prevent your shoes from fitting with the proper snugness for your feet.

DO NOTs:

  • DON’T wear one pair of shoes every single day.  Not only are you wearing them down quicker, they can also become smelly and harbor bacteria and fungi, as these microorganisms thrive in damp, dark, warm surfaces. Try to rotate between at least two pairs of shoes to allow them to dry out completely. Additionally, do not put shoes in an enclosed space right away. Instead, allow them to air out overnight and then put them away if need be.
  • DON’T fold shoe backs. Some shoes have flexible backs that can forcibly be folded down if you’re in a hurry to get out the door. After a few instances of folding the back, you will notice that they stay folded down. This means that the structure of the shoe becomes compromised and your feet may have to strain more to remain stable. You might suffer from chronic overuse injuries like plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis.
  • DON’T drag your feet. Dragging the feet will wear down the outer soles of your shoes and can also make you more prone to tripping over your own feet or a curb. You can sustain an injury like an ankle sprain or broken toe if you’re not careful!
  • DON’T continue to wear shoes that hurt. If shoes hurt your feet, you can either donate them or try adding cushioning with orthotic inserts to better support your feet.

Have your shoes turned on you and started causing you pain? Let us help you find a solution to your foot or ankle woes. Make an appointment today at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your feet to find the best treatments or solutions for your feet. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
August 22, 2018
Category: Foot Pain
Tags: Bunions   Flat Feet   Hammertoes   Neuroma   Shoes   injury   orthotic   dancing  

A neuroma is a condition in which the tissue around a nerve becomes thickened.

You might have a neuroma in your foot if you:

  • feel like you want to remove a small stone that you keep stepping on, but when you take your shoes off, it’s never there.
  • feel like you have a pinched nerve in the ball of your foot.
  • have burning pain, numbness, or tingling between the third and fourth toes.

A neuroma in your foot is called Morton’s Neuroma and it’s usually caused by inflammation, irritation or injury. Repetitive motions with high pressure on the balls of the feet can cause chronic inflammation on the soft tissues near the nerve. This can include wearing shoes with high heels and/or narrow toe boxes for long periods of time. Participating in activities like dancing or sports that involve running, sprinting, or jumping are also likely culprits. Additionally, if you injure the foot by dropping something on it or stepping hard on a pointed object, it can cause a prolonged inflammation in that nerve.

Some foot deformities can also put you at higher risk of developing symptoms of Morton’s Neuroma. Hammertoes, bunions, flat feet, or very high arches can all shift your body weight so that the ball of the foot has to unevenly bear more weight. 

Once symptoms set in, it’s important to rest the foot and reduce inflammation and pain to prevent worsening and ongoing symptoms. Using orthotic inserts, applying ice, massaging the foot, and/or anti-inflammatory drugs may help you feel better. You may also consider how your shoes might be affecting the way your feet feel on a day-to-day basis. If they are too tight, your toes might need more room to relax throughout the day. If you don’t have enough arch support or cushioning, the balls of your feet might have to strain more.

If conservative at-home treatments and adjusting your shoes do not help, our podiatrist might use cortisone injections or sclerosing alcohol injections to relieve pain. At worst case scenario, the nerve may need to be surgically removed.

Don’t suffer from Morton’s Neuroma! We can help you feel better! Make an appointment today at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your feet to find the best treatments or solutions for your feet. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!

By Clark Podiatry Center
April 18, 2018
Category: Common Treatments
Tags: corns   calluses   Bunions   Hammertoes   High Heels   Shoes   orthotic   deformities   gaits  

Do you have hardened bumps on your toes or patches of thickened skin on the bottom of your feet? Because of the various surfaces on which your feet walk, they have a way to protect themselves from harm. Skin begins to thicken in spots where they experience a lot of pressure or friction.

Who is likely to get corns and calluses?

Corns: Those with foot deformities like hammertoes, curly toes, claw toes, or bunions are more likely to experience corns. This is especially the case if you wear shoes that are too tight or too short. Additionally, those who stand or walk for long periods of time can experience constant friction. Corns are usually localized to a small, specific location, such as the toes.

Calluses: Those who wear high heels, have lost fat padding on the balls of the feet, or have abnormal gaits can experience constant pressure on certain wider parts of the feet, like at the base of the balls of the feet.

Should you treat corns and calluses at home? Or go see a podiatrist?

You may have noticed some over-the-counter corn and/or callus medications. Before applying any type of medications, try some of these following adjustments before corns or calluses become painful or to relieve painful symptoms:

  • Try wearing shoes that are snug, but not too tight. You shouldn’t buy shoes expecting that they will stretch out. Make sure you always wear socks with shoes to reduce friction on the skin of the feet.
  • There are pads you can apply to the areas of the shoes that seem to cause friction against the skin of the feet.

When the abovementioned tips don’t do trick, you may need to have corns or calluses filed down or removed by a podiatrist.  They may use one or more of the following:

  • Trim down or cut away thickened skin with a scalpel. Trying it at home can lead to an infection, so it’s best not to try this at home.
  • Use salicylic acid in patches or gels to remove corns or calluses.
  • Prescribe or custom-make orthotic inserts to cushion problems that develop from deformities or bony protrusions.

If your corns or calluses are painful and you need help treating them, make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Brandon Macy, DPM at Clark Podiatry Center. He can find the best treatment options to get you feeling better. Come see him at our Clark, NJ office, which serves the surrounding Union County areas.

By Clark Podiatry Center
April 04, 2018
Category: Plantar fasciitis

One of the most common causes of pain along the bottom of the feet is plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a thick band of tissue (ligament) that connects the toes to the heel bone. When it is strained or injured, the body responds with inflammation, sending us signals that something is wrong. Painful and/or tingly sensations can be felt after a long period of rest (i.e. sleeping), as well as after intense exercise.

Arch Pain

Those who have high arches, overpronate (walk with arches flat on the ground and ankles rolling inward), wear high heels, or play sports with repetitive impact motions are more likely to experience arch pain with plantar fasciitis. These risk factors cause more strain on the plantar fascia.

Heel Pain

Over time, the ligament can pull on the bone enough to cause a bone spur to develop on the bottom/front of the heel bone. This can cause pain with each step since a bony growth begins to protrude. Like with arch pain due to plantar fasciitis, those who play sports including running, jumping or sudden twisting movements (i.e. golf) can feel heel pain.

If you suspect that you have symptoms of plantar fasciitis, you will want to take measures to prevent it from getting worse. You can try stretching the feet and calves when you wake up in the morning, massaging the plantar fascia ligament with a small ball, enjoying a warm foot soak, as well as using additional orthotic inserts or padding. For those with high arches or fallen arches, orthotics can help support the irregular shape of the foot so that the ligament does not have to strain so much to stabilize.

Have you tried some of these techniques and still found that your plantar fasciitis is getting worse? Come see us for podiatrist-prescribed treatment, such as physical therapy or laser therapy at our office. Make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Brandon Macy, DPM at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet and the best treatment options to get you back on track.  Come see him at our Clark, NJ office, which serves the surrounding Union County areas.



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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470