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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: ingrown toenails

By Clark Podiatry Center
October 28, 2019
Category: Toenail problems

At Clark Podiatry Center, we know it’s the time of year for ghoulish costumes and horror movies, but ghastly toe troubles are definitely something patients do not enjoy. We often take our toes for granted until something goes wrong. Below are some common toe problems and their sometimes gruesome symptoms.

Ingrown Toenails—this insidious condition can develop slowly, almost without you realizing it, until you start to experience pain and notice that your toenail appears to be blowing up with swelling. When a toenail grows downward and back into the skin, it’s called an ingrown nail. When the nail actually punctures the skin, it causes redness and swelling, and the area becomes incredibly tender and painful. It can also become infected, and if this happens, you may notice pus or other discharge as well.

Black Toenails—looking down and noticing your toenail is black can be frightening, but it is most often the sign of repetitive trauma or stress to the toe. If you are a runner, for example, the constant pounding of the toe up against the front of the shoe can cause bleeding under the nail, which pools and causes the black appearance. It’s still a good idea to have the foot doctor examine the toe to rule out any more serious conditions.

Fungal Toenails—a nail that has a fungal infection can appear discolored, and the edges may be brittle and crumbly. In some cases, the nail may even separate from the bed, and there can be a foul odor as well. The foot doctor has several treatment options available, including laser therapy, to restore your nail to health.

If you notice any unusual or concerning symptoms about your toes, nails, or any other part of your foot, make an appointment with Clark Podiatry Center by calling 732-382-3470. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon A. Macy will examine your feet and provide a prompt diagnosis of your disorder and the best course of treatment. We are proud to say that New Jersey’s Children’s Foot Health Institute is a part of the Clark Podiatry Center.

We look forward to serving you at our Clark, New Jersey office.

By Clark Podiatry Center
July 31, 2019
Category: Running

As the weather gets warmer, more and more people will go outside to participate in a popular and healthy activity; running. With this can come some foot health issues. They include:

  • Corns and Calluses – hardened areas of skin where there is friction between the toes, feet, and shoe
  • Blisters – open sores due to poor footwear support
  • Ingrown toenails – toenails that have been pushed inward and cut into the toe causing pain
  • Bunions – bony protrusions on your big toes due to poorly shoes or genetics
  • Athlete’s foot – a fungal infection often caused when people go barefoot in public pools and showers
  • Strains and sprains – overuse of the foot or ankle muscles especially if you haven’t stretched
  • Shin splints – a painful inflammation of the shin caused by repeated pounding on a hard surface

Runners can avoid these problems by taking the necessary precautions. Ways to avoid these foot issues include:

  • Making sure you have well-fitted shoes – this will cut down on corns, calluses, bunions, ingrown toenails and blisters
  • Dry socks - make sure you have replacement socks as moist socks will breed bacteria which will lead to athlete’s feet
  • Never share shoes or socks – prevents the sharing of the athlete’s foot fungus
  • Never walk barefoot in a public shower or pool – prevents athlete’s foot fungus from spreading
  • Stretch your foot and leg muscles – will help avoid strains and sprains
  • Avoid hard surfaces when running – seek out softer surfaces like artificial track surfaces or the good old earth. Dirt is better than pavement and gives more on contact  

Taking these precautions will help you keep running and getting into the best shape you can. Taking care of your feet is the same as taking care of the special tires used for NASCAR and other types of racing. Without them, racers could not successfully compete.

If you are you a concerned runner or athlete or are just generally concerned about the health of your feet, schedule an appointment with Clark Podiatry Center to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon A. Macy. He can assess your feet to ensure that there are no issues making sure that you not only choose the right shoes but also keep your feet healthy. See us at our Clark, New Jersey office today!

By Clark Podiatry Center
June 05, 2019
Tags: blisters   fungus   ingrown toenails   Bunions   Hammertoes   stretch   callus   corn   podiatrist   ballet   black nails  

Dancing is one of man’s oldest activities. Either as a celebration or entertainment, dance has been around for many years. Some historical records show dance as an active part of a human culture dating as far back as 3300 B.C. in India and Egypt. Just where and when it began is unknown, but it would not be unusual to imagine ancient man celebrating a successful hunt with a ‘dance’ around the communal campfire millions of years ago.

One type of modern dance that is still popular today is ballet. Ballet dancing includes, music, costumes and stage scenery and is usually done on the dancer’s toes. Because of this, ballet dancing can take a heavy toll on a dancer’s feet.

Some of the foot problems ballet dancers experience include:

  • Blisters – a sore on your foot filled liquid. Some can be popped while others should be left to heal on their own
  • Bunions – a deformity at the base of the big toe
  • Hammertoes – where the toe is buckled up at a joint
  • Callus – the development of a thick and hard layer of skin often over the ball of the foot, heel or outer edge of the big toe
  • Corn – smaller thickening layer of skin with a soft core
  • Black nails – bruising or bleeding under the nail
  • Ingrown toenails – where the sides of the nail grow into the nail groove

Basic Footcare for Ballet:

  • Alternate shoes – changing the shoes you perform in will allow them to dry and help prevent the growth of foot disease causing fungus
  • Moisturize your feet
  • Wear padding to help support your toes
  • Proper fitting ballet shoes – see a ballet store to determine if your ballet shoes fit properly
  • Stretch your feet when not dancing
  • See your podiatrist – regular visits to your podiatrist will help maintain foot health especially with all the stress and potential for foot problems that can come with ballet

Like any sport or activity, ballet requires dedication and hard work. Keeping in shape is very important to be your best when it comes to ballet. This applies especially to your feet.

If you or your children are considering ballet or have any foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

Patients are always asking why their ingrown nails keep coming back and why can't they be cut "properly" -- whatever that means--so that the problem never comes back.

Unfortunately, the shape of a toenail can't be changed by cutting it different—straight across, back on an angle or the anachronistic V-shaped notch in the middle of the nail (which has never worked going back to cave-man days). Nails grow straight out toward the tip of the toe.  Ingrown nails are nails which have curled so that the edges can't grow past the skin of the nail groove on the side and poke into the skin. A sharp edge or a poorly trimmed nail can break through the skin in which case an infection can ensue.

In these circumstances, cutting the nail better in the corners can help, but temporarily at best. And if frequent infections are the norm, even small ones, then the best way to deal with the problem is to fix it on a lasting basis by performing an in-office procedure called a matrixectomy. Simply put, this is done by making the nail more narrow on the affected side and then cauterizing the so-called "root" of the nail so that the removed portion does not return at all.

If you'd like to see a video of such a procedure, click on video below.  A word of warning: this is an actual surgical procedure and the contents are graphic in nature.

 

 

This particular patient had a problem with a border of both great toenails. The amount of nail removed is determined by how much the nail curls under. We remove as little as possible, but just the right amount to correct the problem

The process of cauterization takes about 60-90 seconds per nail border. Once again, what we're trying to do is to destroy the nail matrix or "root" of the nail in the area in order to prevent that part of the nail from ever growing back. Numbness from the local anesthetic lasts for a few hours and typically there is little or no need for pain medication afterwards, nothing more than ibuprofen or Tylenol.

We provide a wound care kit to use for postoperative care beginning the next day. The old bandages are removed, the toe is rinsed, dried and a small amount of medication is put into the nail groove and the area covered with a band aid. This is done once or twice per day until healing is complete.

Overall healing time is 2-3 weeks with little or no disability. The procedure is quick, simple and VERY successful at relieving the pain of an ingrown toenail once and for all.

For more information or an appointment, contact us at 732-382-3470 or visit our website at www.clarkpodiatry.com.  

At Clark Podiatry Center, we want to keep you walking! 

 
By Clark Podiatry Center
February 13, 2019
Category: Shoes
Tags: blisters   calluses   ingrown toenails   overpronation   Running   injury   fit  

Gearing up to participate in a running event is no simple task. If you want to do your best, you’ll want to start training months in advance, especially if you are running a long race. Additionally, you’ll want the best gear to support you and keep you safe from injury.

What gear could we mean? Your running shoes, of course! To keep your feet supported and as comfortable as possible during your training and the actual race, look for the following features when choosing your running shoes:

  • Shoes designed for running – While cross-trainers and other athletic shoes could work, running shoes are designed with running in mind.
  • Fit – Make sure that the shoes fit the feet well. They shouldn’t be too big or too small as that can also cause problems.
  • Lots of cushion – The repetitive impact you encounter while running can impact your feet, ankles, knees, and hips. This can cause pain while you run, which can limit your performance.
  • Arch and heel support – The arches will be working hard to keep your entire foot engaged. If the arches become tired, they may flatten out, which can cause you pain toward the end of your race and for days after. Additionally, the heels need to be planted in heel cups so that they don’t slide about in the shoes, causing instability.
  • Firm heel counter – A firm heel counter will increase support in the shoes. It will help prevent overpronation (straining the arches) and keep the feet stabilized in the shoes.
  • Good outer sole grip – You’ll most likely be running outdoors during these events, so you’ll want shoes that have a good grip on the outer soles. At any point, if there are slippery or slick surfaces, it can create instability for your feet while you run if you don’t have good or enough tread.
  • Breathable material that supports and flexes at appropriate points – When you check the shoes and take it for a test run, make sure that your feet are not overheating. This is a sign that your shoes are not breathable and can cause you to excessively sweat. That will make perfect conditions to cause foot issues like foot odor, blisters, and calluses.

As you prepare, make sure you keep good hygiene, trim your toenails properly (to prevent ingrown toenails), and stretch your feet and ankles before and after each run. If you experience an injury, it’s important to rest and recover, rather than continuing to train on it.

If you experience foot pain while you are training, see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet and find the best treatment for any concern you may have. Make an appointment at our Clark, NJ office so we can keep you walking (or running!).



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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470