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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: hammertoe

By Clark Podiatry Center
February 07, 2018
Tags: corns   calluses   hammertoe  

Can’t you just get out the root?” is a regular question patients ask when they return for a 2nd, 3rd, 4 visit (or more) over time to relieve their painful corns and calluses. Unfortunately, corns and calluses don’t work that way and there’s a reason for that.  Let’s get to the “root” of the matter.

First, there is no difference between a corn and a callus.  They are more descriptive terms for thickening of the outer layer of the skin in spots due to an excessive amount of pressure and friction on a given spot.  Corns are typically on the toes, calluses elsewhere on the foot. They often become painful due to their bulk, much like if you had a pebble stuck in your shoe.

The underlying cause is a bony deformity—a hammertoe deformity for corns or an imbalance of the metatarsals in the ball of the foot for calluses.  These issues are largely determined by how your feet were built by your parents and how they developed as a result.  The corns and calluses are the results of these deformities, not independent growths, as would be the case if there was a wart present. Occasionally, the corn or callus will have a deep spot in the center which some people think is a root, but is actually just the focus point of the pressure and is thicker than the rest of the lesion.

Initial symptomatic treatment involves carefully paring down the corn or callus, which relieves pain and that is enough for many people. Padding or cushioning help even more. Wearing well-fitting comfortable shoes is also advisable.  Although shoes don’t really cause corns and calluses--they will make the best (or worst) out of the given situation.

Often we’ll recommend orthotics to go in your shoes with accommodations to relieve pressure from calluses. In the more severe cases, symptomatic treatment just isn’t enough and the only way to deal with it is to address the underlying foot deformity by correcting it surgically.

The takeaway point is this:  corns and calluses are symptoms of foot deformities. Treating the symptoms alone will get you temporary relief, which can be OK.  But if you want to prevent them from returning, you need to address the deformity. That is the only way to get at the REAL root of the problem.

For more information or an appointment, contact us at 732-382-3470 or visit our website at www.clarkpodiatry.com.  At Clark Podiatry Center, we want to keep you walking!

#ClarkPodiatryCenter #Calluses #Corns #Footpain



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Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470