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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: hammertoe

By Clark Podiatry Center
October 03, 2019
Category: Exercise

Walking is a basic human activity and has been for centuries. As we make our way to and from destinations, it is estimated that an average person takes 7,500 steps in a day, and if you live to the age of 80, you will likely take close to 216,000,000 steps. Considering this, keeping an eye on your foot health is very important.

Some of the benefits of walking include:

  • Burning calories – every mile walked you burn off 100 calories
  • Heart rate – walking increases the heart rate strengthening the heart muscle pumping blood to necessary parts of the body
  • Blood sugar – helps keep your blood sugar level stable
  • Cholesterol levels – works to reduce cholesterol levels
  • Improve circulation – pumping of blood increases the size of blood vessels
  • Mood – walking is also said to improve mood and may relieve some aspects of depression

Overall, walking is a very good activity, but if you haven’t done a lot, you need to see your doctor or podiatrist before you take up a regimen. Sudden physical exertion can also be a stressor if done too intensely depending on your overall physical condition.

Another thing a podiatrist can do is help you find the right shoe. Depending on your feet, you may need to have an orthotic to help you walk properly as some people have different ways of walking. Two different ways of walking include:

  • Pronator – have flat feet and roll their ankles inward. Pronators need a sturdier shoe
  • Supinator - have high arches and need shoes that provide cushioning for shock absorption

Not all shoes or footwear provide the same support, so choosing the right shoe or sneaker is very important for your foot health. Most running shoes provide good support but must be fit carefully to your feet. Measuring your feet at the end of the day is best because your foot is slightly swollen from walking all day and will allow you room for a comfortable fit.

Your podiatrist will also check for any issues that you have that need to be compensated for such as corns and calluses, bunions, hammertoe, heel spurs, or other.

If you have any questions about walking or have any other concerns about your feet, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
July 01, 2019
Category: foot deformities

If one or more of the joints in your toes look like an inverted ‘v’, you may have something called a hammertoe.  What is a hammertoe? A hammertoe is when one or more of the joints in your second, third, or fourth toe is abnormally bent to one side. Hammertoes can be both painful and uncomfortable and, if not treated properly, lead to surgery. There are two types of hammertoes. One is a flexible hammertoe where the toe can still bend. The other is a rigid hammertoe where the toe is stiff. This type will, most likely, require surgery to resolve. 

Risk factors for a hammertoe include:

  • Age - the older a person is, the more likely they are to develop a hammertoe
  • Sex – women are more apt to develop a hammertoe due to poorly fitting shoes
  • Toe length – the longer the toes, the more it is likely to be bent as ligaments and muscles may not be as strong as on shorter toes
  • Diseases – diabetes and arthritis can cause hammertoes
  • Genetics – a hammertoe can be passed on from relatives through bone structures

It is very important to always have proper fitting shoes. Poor fitting shoes with little room for toes is one cause as are high heel shoes which push toes together. An injury can also contribute to a hammertoe, especially one that damages the toes ligaments and/or muscles.

Treating a hammertoe includes:

  • Change shoes to shoes that fit better and have more room for your toes
  • Orthotics – certain types of footwear pads may be available to help
  • Wear lower heels – will shift the foot weight back away from the toes
  • Toe exercises – some podiatrists recommend trying to pick up marbles with your toes to strengthen muscles and ligaments
  • Surgery – a podiatrist may need to operate and either loosen the tight ligament and/or muscles or cut away bone

The good news about hammertoes is that it is a treatable condition. If you believe you either have or are developing a hammertoe, or have any other concerns about your feet, schedule an appointment with Clark Podiatry Center to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon A. Macy. He can assess your feet to ensure that you keep your feet healthy. Visit us at our Clark, New Jersey office today!

By Clark Podiatry Center
February 07, 2018
Tags: corns   calluses   hammertoe  

Can’t you just get out the root?” is a regular question patients ask when they return for a 2nd, 3rd, 4 visit (or more) over time to relieve their painful corns and calluses. Unfortunately, corns and calluses don’t work that way and there’s a reason for that.  Let’s get to the “root” of the matter.

First, there is no difference between a corn and a callus.  They are more descriptive terms for thickening of the outer layer of the skin in spots due to an excessive amount of pressure and friction on a given spot.  Corns are typically on the toes, calluses elsewhere on the foot. They often become painful due to their bulk, much like if you had a pebble stuck in your shoe.

The underlying cause is a bony deformity—a hammertoe deformity for corns or an imbalance of the metatarsals in the ball of the foot for calluses.  These issues are largely determined by how your feet were built by your parents and how they developed as a result.  The corns and calluses are the results of these deformities, not independent growths, as would be the case if there was a wart present. Occasionally, the corn or callus will have a deep spot in the center which some people think is a root, but is actually just the focus point of the pressure and is thicker than the rest of the lesion.

Initial symptomatic treatment involves carefully paring down the corn or callus, which relieves pain and that is enough for many people. Padding or cushioning help even more. Wearing well-fitting comfortable shoes is also advisable.  Although shoes don’t really cause corns and calluses--they will make the best (or worst) out of the given situation.

Often we’ll recommend orthotics to go in your shoes with accommodations to relieve pressure from calluses. In the more severe cases, symptomatic treatment just isn’t enough and the only way to deal with it is to address the underlying foot deformity by correcting it surgically.

The takeaway point is this:  corns and calluses are symptoms of foot deformities. Treating the symptoms alone will get you temporary relief, which can be OK.  But if you want to prevent them from returning, you need to address the deformity. That is the only way to get at the REAL root of the problem.

For more information or an appointment, contact us at 732-382-3470 or visit our website at www.clarkpodiatry.com.  At Clark Podiatry Center, we want to keep you walking!

#ClarkPodiatryCenter #Calluses #Corns #Footpain



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1114 Raritan Road
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Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470