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Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: corns

By Clark Podiatry Center
June 19, 2019
Category: skin conditions
Tags: blisters   corns   calluses   salicylic acid   pumice stone  

People often get calluses, and corns mixed up as both are the hardened area of the skin. Corns are smaller, painful, and usually have a hard center. Calluses typically develop on the bottom of your feet, where corns can be found in non-weight bearing parts of the foot like between toes.

Traits of a Callus include:

  • Hardened, thick area of skin – usually found on the sole or bottom of your feet
  • Yellow skin – discolored skin
  • Caused by friction, pressure or irritation
  • Can also be found on elbows and knees
  • Will likely cover a bony area of the foot

If there is a lot of pressure exerted on the foot over a short period of time, blisters may also occur.

It is not recommended that over the counter callus removers be used because of the strong acid, which if not applied correctly, can burn the skin. Some people use medicated pads which may reduce pain, but it is best to consult with your podiatrist if you believe you are developing a callus.

Home treatment can include:

  • Soaking your feet in warm water to loosen skin
  • Use a pumice stone to file away the callus gently
  • Good fitting shoes and socks
  • Use a moisturizer to soften the callus

If home treatments do not help, then a podiatrist can do several of the following to relieve your feet of a painful callus:

  • Cutting and trimming the callus
  • Using salicylic acid to burn away the skin (should only be done by a podiatrist to prevent against burns)
  • X-ray – a doctor may take an x-ray to determine if there is a problem with your bones which may require surgery
  • Surgery – may be needed to relieve pressure on a specific part of your foot

Need some more help and encouragement in caring for your feet or choosing the right shoe?  Schedule an appointment with Clark Podiatry Center to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon A. Macy. He can assess your feet to ensure that there are no issues and making sure that you not only choose the right shoe, but also keep your feet healthy. Call us at 732-382-3470 and see us at our Clark, New Jersey office today!

By Clark Podiatry Center
June 11, 2019
Category: warts

Sometimes foot problems can be misidentified causing the wrong treatment to be applied. Plantar warts are one such issue. Often taken for corns or calluses, a plantar wart is a small growth that appears on the heel or other weight-bearing surfaces of your feet.  Plantar warts are caused by the HPV virus or human papillomavirus that enters through cracks in your feet.

Signs of a plantar wart include:

  • Small fleshy growth – occurs on the bottom of your feet
  • Black pinpoints – actually small blood vessels
  • Pain – tenderness in the ball of your foot or another weight-bearing areas
  • Hardened area of the skin – may indicate where the wart has grown inward in your foot

Risk Factors for a plantar wart include:

  • Children and teenagers
  • People that walk barefoot in public places like locker rooms or pools
  • Men and women with weakened immune systems
  • If you’ve had a plantar wart before

Ways to avoid developing a plantar wart include:

  • Wearing sandals in locker rooms or pools
  • Avoid touching a wart, if you do, wash your hands thoroughly
  • Keep your feet clean and dry
  • Alternate shoes and socks

Plantar warts can go away on their own but can take quite a while. You may want to treat the wart yourself or see your podiatrist.

Treating a plantar wart includes:

  • Using an over the counter medicine
  • Salicylic acid – applied by your podiatrist, it will help peel away the wart
  • Cryotherapy – Your podiatrist will freeze it off
  • Surgery – Cutting the wart by an electric needle. Requires a pain medicine
  • Immune therapy – Strengthening your immune system to fight the plantar wart itself
  • Laser therapy – treating the wart with a laser. Must repeated several times to be effective

If you believe you have a plantar wart or any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
March 20, 2019
Category: skin conditions

A Dry foot is a common ailment for many people. Besides looking unhealthy, having dry feet could lead to other more serious conditions, so keeping an eye on the health of your feet is important. Some of the causes of dry feet include:

  • Athlete’s foot – a skin disease caused by a fungus which usually occurs between the toes
  • Eczema - also called dermatitis. Most types cause dry, itchy skin and rashes on the feet
  • Psoriasis – inflammatory skin disease that causes flaking
  • Thyroid disease – over or underactive thyroid can cause an unhealthy thickening of the skin
  • Diabetes – (Associated with feet) loss of feeling due to high levels of sugar in the body

If you have dry feet, try soaking your feet in warm water for 10 to 20 minutes. This will loosen the skin and make it easier to remove. You can also soak pumice stone in warm water and gently rub the foot in a circular motion which will slowly take off the dry skin. Follow this up with a good skin oil or lotion which includes Coconut and olive oil. Make sure you inspect your feet after showers or baths. This is an especially good time to use the pumice stone as your feet will have just come out of the water.

Curing and Preventing Dry Feet

Some of the ways dry skin can be prevented include:

  • Wearing soft, cushiony socks
  • Use wide and comfortable shoes with low heels
  • Use soft insoles that allow the feet to breathe
  • Soak any corns or callouses in warm water
  • Regularly use pumice stones
  • Frequently apply oil or lotion

If you believe you have dry skin or any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
November 13, 2018
Category: skin conditions
Tags: blisters   corns   calluses   warts   Athlete's Foot   Shoes   diabetic   ulcer  

Your skin is one tough organ. It literally holds you together! But it’s also your first defense, making it more prone to attack from the outside world (and maybe some from inside your body). Your skin might not have 99 problems, but they surely are at risk of a lot!

Bacteria, Viruses, and Fungi, Oh My!

  • These microorganisms usually live on and around us, but when we have a break in the skin and they get inside, that’s when an infection can occur. In most cases, cleaning and treating any cuts and scrapes can help to stop infections. However, other infections like Athlete’s foot (caused by the fungus tinea) might need more special care. Viral infections, like warts, can be more difficult and stubborn, ultimately needing podiatric intervention. Hygiene is the first defense and prevention tactic against these little troublemakers.

The attack of the shoes

  • You chose them and bought them – how could they be out to get you? Well, all of us have encountered uncomfortable shoes at one point or another. They can cause blisters, corns, and calluses if they are uncomfortable or cause excessive pressure on certain parts of the feet.
  • Don’t forget that bacteria and fungus can thrive in the moist and warm environment of your shoes, especially if you wear the same shoes every day.

Oops! and Ouch!

  • Oops, you dropped a heavy object on your foot! Ouch! That can really cause swelling, bruising, and turn your toenail black.
  • Oops, you forgot to wear sunblock with your sandals on a hot summer day! Ouch, sunburn got you good. Yes, even your feet are prone to sunburn!

Attack from within

  • Your own body can be your skin’s worst enemy. How? When you have neuropathy (such as diabetic neuropathy), your feet lose feeling. The nerves stop communicating and you can have poor circulation. Your skin can begin to break down and become an ulcer. When left untreated, that ulcer can lead to a really bad infection, gangrene, or even amputation!

Have we made our case for you to take care of your feet, including the skin? Be sure to wash your feet with soap and warm water each day. This is especially important if you go to communal locker rooms where you can easily pick up microorganisms while barefoot.

Noticed a skin problem on your foot? We can help assess your skin. Make an appointment today for a consultation at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your children’s feet to find the best solution for stinky feet! We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
April 18, 2018
Category: Common Treatments
Tags: corns   calluses   Bunions   Hammertoes   High Heels   Shoes   orthotic   deformities   gaits  

Do you have hardened bumps on your toes or patches of thickened skin on the bottom of your feet? Because of the various surfaces on which your feet walk, they have a way to protect themselves from harm. Skin begins to thicken in spots where they experience a lot of pressure or friction.

Who is likely to get corns and calluses?

Corns: Those with foot deformities like hammertoes, curly toes, claw toes, or bunions are more likely to experience corns. This is especially the case if you wear shoes that are too tight or too short. Additionally, those who stand or walk for long periods of time can experience constant friction. Corns are usually localized to a small, specific location, such as the toes.

Calluses: Those who wear high heels, have lost fat padding on the balls of the feet, or have abnormal gaits can experience constant pressure on certain wider parts of the feet, like at the base of the balls of the feet.

Should you treat corns and calluses at home? Or go see a podiatrist?

You may have noticed some over-the-counter corn and/or callus medications. Before applying any type of medications, try some of these following adjustments before corns or calluses become painful or to relieve painful symptoms:

  • Try wearing shoes that are snug, but not too tight. You shouldn’t buy shoes expecting that they will stretch out. Make sure you always wear socks with shoes to reduce friction on the skin of the feet.
  • There are pads you can apply to the areas of the shoes that seem to cause friction against the skin of the feet.

When the abovementioned tips don’t do trick, you may need to have corns or calluses filed down or removed by a podiatrist.  They may use one or more of the following:

  • Trim down or cut away thickened skin with a scalpel. Trying it at home can lead to an infection, so it’s best not to try this at home.
  • Use salicylic acid in patches or gels to remove corns or calluses.
  • Prescribe or custom-make orthotic inserts to cushion problems that develop from deformities or bony protrusions.

If your corns or calluses are painful and you need help treating them, make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Brandon Macy, DPM at Clark Podiatry Center. He can find the best treatment options to get you feeling better. Come see him at our Clark, NJ office, which serves the surrounding Union County areas.



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Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470