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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: corn

By Clark Podiatry Center
June 05, 2019
Tags: blisters   fungus   ingrown toenails   Bunions   Hammertoes   stretch   callus   corn   podiatrist   ballet   black nails  

Dancing is one of man’s oldest activities. Either as a celebration or entertainment, dance has been around for many years. Some historical records show dance as an active part of a human culture dating as far back as 3300 B.C. in India and Egypt. Just where and when it began is unknown, but it would not be unusual to imagine ancient man celebrating a successful hunt with a ‘dance’ around the communal campfire millions of years ago.

One type of modern dance that is still popular today is ballet. Ballet dancing includes, music, costumes and stage scenery and is usually done on the dancer’s toes. Because of this, ballet dancing can take a heavy toll on a dancer’s feet.

Some of the foot problems ballet dancers experience include:

  • Blisters – a sore on your foot filled liquid. Some can be popped while others should be left to heal on their own
  • Bunions – a deformity at the base of the big toe
  • Hammertoes – where the toe is buckled up at a joint
  • Callus – the development of a thick and hard layer of skin often over the ball of the foot, heel or outer edge of the big toe
  • Corn – smaller thickening layer of skin with a soft core
  • Black nails – bruising or bleeding under the nail
  • Ingrown toenails – where the sides of the nail grow into the nail groove

Basic Footcare for Ballet:

  • Alternate shoes – changing the shoes you perform in will allow them to dry and help prevent the growth of foot disease causing fungus
  • Moisturize your feet
  • Wear padding to help support your toes
  • Proper fitting ballet shoes – see a ballet store to determine if your ballet shoes fit properly
  • Stretch your feet when not dancing
  • See your podiatrist – regular visits to your podiatrist will help maintain foot health especially with all the stress and potential for foot problems that can come with ballet

Like any sport or activity, ballet requires dedication and hard work. Keeping in shape is very important to be your best when it comes to ballet. This applies especially to your feet.

If you or your children are considering ballet or have any foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
May 15, 2019
Category: Bunions
Tags: Orthotics   Proper Footwear   arthritis   bunion   callus   corn   podiatrist  

One of the many problems that a person can have is developing a bunion. What is a bunion? A bunion is a painful bone deformity, or bump, at the base of the big toe.

Symptoms of a bunion can include:

  • A large or growing bump on the inside of your big toe’s joint.
  • Pain and swelling
  • A callus or corn on the bump
  • A hardening of the skin on the big toe
  • Difficulty walking on the inflamed foot

There are several causes of a bunion which can include:

  • Poor fitting shoes – shoes that are too narrow. Proper footwear is crucial to healthy feet.
  • Heredity – genetic traits passed down from previous relatives.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis – an inflammatory condition in your joints which helps distort the toe.
  • Polio – Rare but possible condition that weakens muscles.

Bunions can be treated surgically and non-surgically.

Non-surgical treatments include:

  • Good fitting footwear – choosing footwear that allow greater space near the toes will allow them to stretch and move in a more natural position.
  • Orthotics – using a type of specific padding. While you can purchase an orthotic at your local drug store, seeing your podiatrist to determine which type of orthotic is your best choice.
  • Ice – applying ice to the swollen area will usually reduce pain and swelling.
  • Medications – using non-steroid, anti-inflammatory medicine can reduce the pain and swelling.

If the above treatments do not help or help enough, surgery may be needed. Surgery is not recommended for children, however, as their feet are still growing. Less invasive treatments will probably be best. During surgery your podiatrist will realign the bones and ligaments to return the foot to a more natural and comfortable position. This should relieve the pain and swelling and reduce the bump. While usually very effective, taking the proper time to recover is very important.  Surgery is usually completed in one day.

 If you believe you have or are developing a bunion or have any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
December 26, 2018
Category: Foot Health Tips
Tags: Bunions   Orthotics   Athlete's Foot   fungal   toe exercises   wart   corn  

The holidays are coming to a close, and now it’s time to ring in the New Year! Whether you’re staying home with family or celebrating with friends at a party, remember to stay safe and keep your feet comfortable. After all, they’ve worked hard for you all year in 2018!

So how will you keep them healthy and in tip-top shape in the New Year? Here are some ways you can help your feet to be healthier and stronger so that they can keep you walking:

  • Daily foot hygiene is key to keeping your feet free from bacterial or fungal infection. Don’t start your year off with Athlete’s foot! Use flip flops in communal showers and wash your feet daily with soap and warm water! Why wait for infection symptoms when you can prevent them?
  • Incorporate foot exercises into your regular physical activity. Remember, we recommend moderate to vigorous activity, at least 3 times a week. Try doing exercises like calf stretches, heel-ups (tip toes), and toe exercises like curls with a small gym towel. You can even do some while sitting at your office desk, like foot circles, as well as pointing and flexing them.
  • Step it up! Got a new phone, smartwatch, or other activity trackers as a holiday gift? Put it to good use! Start tracking the number of steps you’re getting each day. It’s a great motivator to keep active instead of leading a sedentary lifestyle. You might be surprised just how much or how little steps you get in per day!
  • Start wearing the right shoes. We’re not necessarily saying that you are wearing the wrong shoes, but rather that there are shoes that may better suit your feet. Since they are working hard for us every day, why not get comfortable and supportive shoes for our feet? If you need orthotics, get them! That way they won’t be tired or sore at the end of a long day.
  • Stop ignoring your foot problems and finally get around to treating them. Had a pesky wart that doesn’t hurt but won’t go away? How about a new corn that’s been developing? Many women develop mild bunions and when left untreated, can become very large and disfigured. In the New Year, we urge you to come to see your podiatrist so that he can help you get the foot care that you need. Why wait for it to become a bigger problem?
  • Hydrate and Eat well. Most people want to start the year healthy. Eating a nutritious diet and remembering to stay hydrated is a great start. Not only will your whole body benefit, but you’ll also be reducing the risk of potential foot problems as well. Additionally, if you do have some foot problems, foods full of nutrients can help them heal more quickly.

Maybe you’ll incorporate these into your New Year’s Resolutions. It is, indeed the time to make important new healthy habits and break bad unhealthy ones.

Need some more help and encouragement for healthier feet in the New Year? Schedule your annual podiatry checkup by making an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet to ensure that there are no issues and recommend some great ways to keep you walking. Come see us at our Clark, NJ office today!

 

 



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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470