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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: calluses

By Clark Podiatry Center
November 13, 2018
Category: skin conditions
Tags: blisters   corns   calluses   warts   Athlete's Foot   Shoes   diabetic   ulcer  

Your skin is one tough organ. It literally holds you together! But it’s also your first defense, making it more prone to attack from the outside world (and maybe some from inside your body). Your skin might not have 99 problems, but they surely are at risk of a lot!

Bacteria, Viruses, and Fungi, Oh My!

  • These microorganisms usually live on and around us, but when we have a break in the skin and they get inside, that’s when an infection can occur. In most cases, cleaning and treating any cuts and scrapes can help to stop infections. However, other infections like Athlete’s foot (caused by the fungus tinea) might need more special care. Viral infections, like warts, can be more difficult and stubborn, ultimately needing podiatric intervention. Hygiene is the first defense and prevention tactic against these little troublemakers.

The attack of the shoes

  • You chose them and bought them – how could they be out to get you? Well, all of us have encountered uncomfortable shoes at one point or another. They can cause blisters, corns, and calluses if they are uncomfortable or cause excessive pressure on certain parts of the feet.
  • Don’t forget that bacteria and fungus can thrive in the moist and warm environment of your shoes, especially if you wear the same shoes every day.

Oops! and Ouch!

  • Oops, you dropped a heavy object on your foot! Ouch! That can really cause swelling, bruising, and turn your toenail black.
  • Oops, you forgot to wear sunblock with your sandals on a hot summer day! Ouch, sunburn got you good. Yes, even your feet are prone to sunburn!

Attack from within

  • Your own body can be your skin’s worst enemy. How? When you have neuropathy (such as diabetic neuropathy), your feet lose feeling. The nerves stop communicating and you can have poor circulation. Your skin can begin to break down and become an ulcer. When left untreated, that ulcer can lead to a really bad infection, gangrene, or even amputation!

Have we made our case for you to take care of your feet, including the skin? Be sure to wash your feet with soap and warm water each day. This is especially important if you go to communal locker rooms where you can easily pick up microorganisms while barefoot.

Noticed a skin problem on your foot? We can help assess your skin. Make an appointment today for a consultation at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your children’s feet to find the best solution for stinky feet! We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
April 18, 2018
Category: Common Treatments
Tags: corns   calluses   Bunions   Hammertoes   High Heels   Shoes   orthotic   deformities   gaits  

Do you have hardened bumps on your toes or patches of thickened skin on the bottom of your feet? Because of the various surfaces on which your feet walk, they have a way to protect themselves from harm. Skin begins to thicken in spots where they experience a lot of pressure or friction.

Who is likely to get corns and calluses?

Corns: Those with foot deformities like hammertoes, curly toes, claw toes, or bunions are more likely to experience corns. This is especially the case if you wear shoes that are too tight or too short. Additionally, those who stand or walk for long periods of time can experience constant friction. Corns are usually localized to a small, specific location, such as the toes.

Calluses: Those who wear high heels, have lost fat padding on the balls of the feet, or have abnormal gaits can experience constant pressure on certain wider parts of the feet, like at the base of the balls of the feet.

Should you treat corns and calluses at home? Or go see a podiatrist?

You may have noticed some over-the-counter corn and/or callus medications. Before applying any type of medications, try some of these following adjustments before corns or calluses become painful or to relieve painful symptoms:

  • Try wearing shoes that are snug, but not too tight. You shouldn’t buy shoes expecting that they will stretch out. Make sure you always wear socks with shoes to reduce friction on the skin of the feet.
  • There are pads you can apply to the areas of the shoes that seem to cause friction against the skin of the feet.

When the abovementioned tips don’t do trick, you may need to have corns or calluses filed down or removed by a podiatrist.  They may use one or more of the following:

  • Trim down or cut away thickened skin with a scalpel. Trying it at home can lead to an infection, so it’s best not to try this at home.
  • Use salicylic acid in patches or gels to remove corns or calluses.
  • Prescribe or custom-make orthotic inserts to cushion problems that develop from deformities or bony protrusions.

If your corns or calluses are painful and you need help treating them, make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Brandon Macy, DPM at Clark Podiatry Center. He can find the best treatment options to get you feeling better. Come see him at our Clark, NJ office, which serves the surrounding Union County areas.

By Clark Podiatry Center
February 07, 2018
Tags: corns   calluses   hammertoe  

Can’t you just get out the root?” is a regular question patients ask when they return for a 2nd, 3rd, 4 visit (or more) over time to relieve their painful corns and calluses. Unfortunately, corns and calluses don’t work that way and there’s a reason for that.  Let’s get to the “root” of the matter.

First, there is no difference between a corn and a callus.  They are more descriptive terms for thickening of the outer layer of the skin in spots due to an excessive amount of pressure and friction on a given spot.  Corns are typically on the toes, calluses elsewhere on the foot. They often become painful due to their bulk, much like if you had a pebble stuck in your shoe.

The underlying cause is a bony deformity—a hammertoe deformity for corns or an imbalance of the metatarsals in the ball of the foot for calluses.  These issues are largely determined by how your feet were built by your parents and how they developed as a result.  The corns and calluses are the results of these deformities, not independent growths, as would be the case if there was a wart present. Occasionally, the corn or callus will have a deep spot in the center which some people think is a root, but is actually just the focus point of the pressure and is thicker than the rest of the lesion.

Initial symptomatic treatment involves carefully paring down the corn or callus, which relieves pain and that is enough for many people. Padding or cushioning help even more. Wearing well-fitting comfortable shoes is also advisable.  Although shoes don’t really cause corns and calluses--they will make the best (or worst) out of the given situation.

Often we’ll recommend orthotics to go in your shoes with accommodations to relieve pressure from calluses. In the more severe cases, symptomatic treatment just isn’t enough and the only way to deal with it is to address the underlying foot deformity by correcting it surgically.

The takeaway point is this:  corns and calluses are symptoms of foot deformities. Treating the symptoms alone will get you temporary relief, which can be OK.  But if you want to prevent them from returning, you need to address the deformity. That is the only way to get at the REAL root of the problem.

For more information or an appointment, contact us at 732-382-3470 or visit our website at www.clarkpodiatry.com.  At Clark Podiatry Center, we want to keep you walking!

#ClarkPodiatryCenter #Calluses #Corns #Footpain

By Clark Podiatry Center
June 22, 2017
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: corns   calluses   Hammertoes  

Hammertoes can be a pain. Literally. Typically, the deformity affects your second toe (closest to the big toe), but can happen to your other small toes as well. A weakened toe muscle begins to put pressure on the toe’s joints and tendons, making the toe’s second toe joint stick up. It makes a tented shape with the toe. Related conditions include mallet toe and claw toe, in which the end joint or both end and middle joints are bent upward. 

When you’ve got hammertoes, it can be uncomfortable at the least. Shoes may not fit properly and you may become unhappy with the shape of your feet. Worse, hammertoes can cause you pain because the shape of the toes can cause you to have corns or calluses on the bent joint. The friction from wearing tight shoes makes it worse.

Why you get Hammertoes: Genetics plays a major part in why you may develop hammertoes. The foot type you are born with can make you prone to certain conditions like hammertoes. Shoes that do not fit well can make things worse. If they tend to make you put more pressure on the front of the foot (like with high heels), hammertoes can become aggravated. Additionally, if you’ve got an injury, arthritis, or even diabetes, you may be at higher risk of developing hammertoes. 

 

Prevention and Treatment:

If your family is prone to hammertoes or if you sense that your toes are starting to show signs of hammertoes, there are some steps you can take to prevent them from getting worse.

  • It’s best for you to wear comfortable and supportive shoes. Arch supports can help slow progression of hammertoes. Also, shoes that have high heels and/or a narrow toebox will cramp your toes and make it much more likely for you to develop hammertoes. 
  • Some foot exercises can help to keep up strength in your toes so that the deformity does not become worse. Exercises involving extending and curling the toes, as well as picking up small objects to move them can help strengthen toes. 

 

For hammertoes that have progressed, the following treatments are available:

  • If the hammertoes are still flexible, it’s possible to slow the progress of the deformity by using some strips and splints. Additionally, you can use pads to cushion the bent portion of your toes, especially if you have corns or calluses. You can also do a warm foot soak and use a pumice stone to file down corns. 
  • For severe cases where hammertoes that have become rigid and painful, surgery is probably the best option. It can be performed in an outpatient setting with a short recovery period. 

If you suspect development of hammertoes, it’s best that you come to see us sooner than later so that the problem does not get much worse. Make an appointment today at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your toes to find the best treatment. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!

 
By Clark Podiatry Center
June 02, 2017

Our children’s health is always of top concern. With the myriad of information out there about things that can go wrong, it can be hard for parents to determine when something is actually a problem for our growing children. The older they get, their bodies go through many changes, and sometimes it can be difficult to decipher what’s normal and what isn’t.

At least with regards to their feet, we at the New Jersey Foot Health Institute of Clark Podiatry Center have some tips as to when you should pay close attention to possible children’s foot problems. Look out for the following symptoms or issues:

  • Pain, swelling, redness, and/or heat that does not subside after using the RICE method (rest, ice, compression, elevation). Remember that growing pains or NOT normal in the feet.
  • Blisters, corns, or calluses on one part of the feet.
  • Chronic ingrown toenails.
  • Walking issues – Look for problems in the gait, such as in-toeing, out-toeing, or toe walking. Look for shape the shape of legs when they stand or walk, focusing on whether or not the legs are bowed out or caving inward.
  • Deformities in the way their feet look – e.g. clubfoot, curly toes, hammertoes, flat feet.
  • Ankles that seem to easily roll or twist often.

Inspect your regularly for changes in the skin of the feet as well, especially after your child has been playing barefoot or in socks. Check for cuts, bruises, color change, rashes, or odor, and treat accordingly. Children are also prone to fungal or viral infections, so foot hygiene is very important. Many older children may ignore foot pain or try to shake it off, so it’s best to be vigilant about any changes in walking or behavior.

If you suspect that your child might have a foot problem, or if your child is complaining of foot pain, make an appointment today at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your children’s feet to find the best treatments or solutions for their developing feet. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!



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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470