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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: blisters

By Clark Podiatry Center
November 11, 2019

Are you sitting at the office? How about in the locker room before the game?

Go ahead. Wiggle your toes and answer the questions below. At Clark Podiatry Center, we want to keep you walking — with support and comfort. When footwear no longer meets those requirements, you are at risk for corns, calluses, bunions, and blisters. If you can no longer wiggle your toes in your shoes, it’s time for a trip to the podiatrist and to the shoe store.

Are your toes rubbing against your shoes or socks?

Friction is not your friend when it comes to your shoes. With each step that you take, increased friction and pressure on your feet and toes can only lead to pain and discomfort. Some of the results include corns, calluses, bunions, or blisters. If you have diabetes and a condition known as neuropathy, this is even more dangerous and can further irritate cuts and bruises. Neuropathy is nerve damage; many times patients don’t feel that their shoes are too tight or that corns or wounds are becoming irritated.

Are you relieved to free your feet from your shoes?

Whether it’s for a specific event, or for your 9-to-5 commitments, you shouldn’t be counting down the hours until you can remove your shoes. Your feet should not hurt. If you’re in pain, it’s time to visit a podiatrist. You may need to rethink your footwear or there may be other conditions that are causing discomfort.
 

Do your shoes leave marks on your socks or skin?

Seeing is believing for this question. If you have marks on your skin, stop wearing those shoes immediately.

Are you concerned about leaving enough wiggle room in your shoes? Make an appointment with Clark Podiatry Center by calling 732-382-3470. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon A. Macy, can provide guidance on next steps to help you walk without pain and discomfort. Don’t forget that New Jersey’s Children’s Foot Health Institute is a part of the Clark Podiatry Center. Visit us at our Clark, New Jersey office.

By Clark Podiatry Center
September 18, 2019
Category: proper foot care
Tags: blisters   diabetes   toenails   Athlete's Foot   podiatrist  

One of the most common and taken for granted parts of the body is our feet. Maybe it’s because we use them every day without thinking that we just don’t always put a lot of emphasis on them. The truth of the matter, though, is that our feet are one of the most important parts of our body. Without them we’d be stationary, a condition not usually confronted by most people. It is because of their importance, realized or not that taking care of them is very important and should be of concern to everyone.

So how much importance do we put on them, and how do we make sure they are taken care of? Good questions. First, we need to ensure they are in good condition, and the best way to do this is to make an appointment with your podiatrist. Your podiatrist is trained to ensure that your feet are healthy and, if a condition arises, treated properly. While many of us believe we can do this ourselves, this is not always true or best for us.

Reasons to contact your podiatrist include:

  • Introductory appointment – if you haven’t seen your podiatrist, make an appointment now and have them diagnose your feet for any unknown issues
  • Regular visits – checkups can keep your feet in the best condition
  • Continued pain in your feet – pain is abnormal and an indicator there is a problem
  • Blisters on your feet – shows an infection or irregular wear may be associated with your footwear or part of a developing problem
  • Cracking or peeling of the skin on your feet – can be the sign of a fungus or athlete’s foot
  • Changes in the toenails – can be a sign of a fungal infection which can spread or develop into more serious complications
  • Diabetes – a very serious condition your podiatrist needs to know about
  • When home or over the counter treatments do not work – an obvious sign that more serious medical attention is needed

In any case, seeing your podiatrist is just good common sense. As we get older, we seem to get to know more and more doctors. Why not add your podiatrist to the mix and cover all the bases?

Need some more help and encouragement in caring for your feet or even choosing the right shoes? Schedule an appointment with Clark Podiatry Center to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon A. Macy. He can assess your feet to ensure that there are no issues, making sure that you not only choose the right shoes but also keep your feet healthy. See us at our Clark, New Jersey office today!

By Clark Podiatry Center
July 31, 2019
Category: Running

As the weather gets warmer, more and more people will go outside to participate in a popular and healthy activity; running. With this can come some foot health issues. They include:

  • Corns and Calluses – hardened areas of skin where there is friction between the toes, feet, and shoe
  • Blisters – open sores due to poor footwear support
  • Ingrown toenails – toenails that have been pushed inward and cut into the toe causing pain
  • Bunions – bony protrusions on your big toes due to poorly shoes or genetics
  • Athlete’s foot – a fungal infection often caused when people go barefoot in public pools and showers
  • Strains and sprains – overuse of the foot or ankle muscles especially if you haven’t stretched
  • Shin splints – a painful inflammation of the shin caused by repeated pounding on a hard surface

Runners can avoid these problems by taking the necessary precautions. Ways to avoid these foot issues include:

  • Making sure you have well-fitted shoes – this will cut down on corns, calluses, bunions, ingrown toenails and blisters
  • Dry socks - make sure you have replacement socks as moist socks will breed bacteria which will lead to athlete’s feet
  • Never share shoes or socks – prevents the sharing of the athlete’s foot fungus
  • Never walk barefoot in a public shower or pool – prevents athlete’s foot fungus from spreading
  • Stretch your foot and leg muscles – will help avoid strains and sprains
  • Avoid hard surfaces when running – seek out softer surfaces like artificial track surfaces or the good old earth. Dirt is better than pavement and gives more on contact  

Taking these precautions will help you keep running and getting into the best shape you can. Taking care of your feet is the same as taking care of the special tires used for NASCAR and other types of racing. Without them, racers could not successfully compete.

If you are you a concerned runner or athlete or are just generally concerned about the health of your feet, schedule an appointment with Clark Podiatry Center to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon A. Macy. He can assess your feet to ensure that there are no issues making sure that you not only choose the right shoes but also keep your feet healthy. See us at our Clark, New Jersey office today!

By Clark Podiatry Center
June 19, 2019
Category: skin conditions
Tags: blisters   corns   calluses   salicylic acid   pumice stone  

People often get calluses, and corns mixed up as both are the hardened area of the skin. Corns are smaller, painful, and usually have a hard center. Calluses typically develop on the bottom of your feet, where corns can be found in non-weight bearing parts of the foot like between toes.

Traits of a Callus include:

  • Hardened, thick area of skin – usually found on the sole or bottom of your feet
  • Yellow skin – discolored skin
  • Caused by friction, pressure or irritation
  • Can also be found on elbows and knees
  • Will likely cover a bony area of the foot

If there is a lot of pressure exerted on the foot over a short period of time, blisters may also occur.

It is not recommended that over the counter callus removers be used because of the strong acid, which if not applied correctly, can burn the skin. Some people use medicated pads which may reduce pain, but it is best to consult with your podiatrist if you believe you are developing a callus.

Home treatment can include:

  • Soaking your feet in warm water to loosen skin
  • Use a pumice stone to file away the callus gently
  • Good fitting shoes and socks
  • Use a moisturizer to soften the callus

If home treatments do not help, then a podiatrist can do several of the following to relieve your feet of a painful callus:

  • Cutting and trimming the callus
  • Using salicylic acid to burn away the skin (should only be done by a podiatrist to prevent against burns)
  • X-ray – a doctor may take an x-ray to determine if there is a problem with your bones which may require surgery
  • Surgery – may be needed to relieve pressure on a specific part of your foot

Need some more help and encouragement in caring for your feet or choosing the right shoe?  Schedule an appointment with Clark Podiatry Center to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon A. Macy. He can assess your feet to ensure that there are no issues and making sure that you not only choose the right shoe, but also keep your feet healthy. Call us at 732-382-3470 and see us at our Clark, New Jersey office today!

By Clark Podiatry Center
June 05, 2019
Tags: blisters   fungus   ingrown toenails   Bunions   Hammertoes   stretch   callus   corn   podiatrist   ballet   black nails  

Dancing is one of man’s oldest activities. Either as a celebration or entertainment, dance has been around for many years. Some historical records show dance as an active part of a human culture dating as far back as 3300 B.C. in India and Egypt. Just where and when it began is unknown, but it would not be unusual to imagine ancient man celebrating a successful hunt with a ‘dance’ around the communal campfire millions of years ago.

One type of modern dance that is still popular today is ballet. Ballet dancing includes, music, costumes and stage scenery and is usually done on the dancer’s toes. Because of this, ballet dancing can take a heavy toll on a dancer’s feet.

Some of the foot problems ballet dancers experience include:

  • Blisters – a sore on your foot filled liquid. Some can be popped while others should be left to heal on their own
  • Bunions – a deformity at the base of the big toe
  • Hammertoes – where the toe is buckled up at a joint
  • Callus – the development of a thick and hard layer of skin often over the ball of the foot, heel or outer edge of the big toe
  • Corn – smaller thickening layer of skin with a soft core
  • Black nails – bruising or bleeding under the nail
  • Ingrown toenails – where the sides of the nail grow into the nail groove

Basic Footcare for Ballet:

  • Alternate shoes – changing the shoes you perform in will allow them to dry and help prevent the growth of foot disease causing fungus
  • Moisturize your feet
  • Wear padding to help support your toes
  • Proper fitting ballet shoes – see a ballet store to determine if your ballet shoes fit properly
  • Stretch your feet when not dancing
  • See your podiatrist – regular visits to your podiatrist will help maintain foot health especially with all the stress and potential for foot problems that can come with ballet

Like any sport or activity, ballet requires dedication and hard work. Keeping in shape is very important to be your best when it comes to ballet. This applies especially to your feet.

If you or your children are considering ballet or have any foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.



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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470