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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: blisters

By Clark Podiatry Center
November 13, 2018
Category: skin conditions
Tags: blisters   corns   calluses   warts   Athlete's Foot   Shoes   diabetic   ulcer  

Your skin is one tough organ. It literally holds you together! But it’s also your first defense, making it more prone to attack from the outside world (and maybe some from inside your body). Your skin might not have 99 problems, but they surely are at risk of a lot!

Bacteria, Viruses, and Fungi, Oh My!

  • These microorganisms usually live on and around us, but when we have a break in the skin and they get inside, that’s when an infection can occur. In most cases, cleaning and treating any cuts and scrapes can help to stop infections. However, other infections like Athlete’s foot (caused by the fungus tinea) might need more special care. Viral infections, like warts, can be more difficult and stubborn, ultimately needing podiatric intervention. Hygiene is the first defense and prevention tactic against these little troublemakers.

The attack of the shoes

  • You chose them and bought them – how could they be out to get you? Well, all of us have encountered uncomfortable shoes at one point or another. They can cause blisters, corns, and calluses if they are uncomfortable or cause excessive pressure on certain parts of the feet.
  • Don’t forget that bacteria and fungus can thrive in the moist and warm environment of your shoes, especially if you wear the same shoes every day.

Oops! and Ouch!

  • Oops, you dropped a heavy object on your foot! Ouch! That can really cause swelling, bruising, and turn your toenail black.
  • Oops, you forgot to wear sunblock with your sandals on a hot summer day! Ouch, sunburn got you good. Yes, even your feet are prone to sunburn!

Attack from within

  • Your own body can be your skin’s worst enemy. How? When you have neuropathy (such as diabetic neuropathy), your feet lose feeling. The nerves stop communicating and you can have poor circulation. Your skin can begin to break down and become an ulcer. When left untreated, that ulcer can lead to a really bad infection, gangrene, or even amputation!

Have we made our case for you to take care of your feet, including the skin? Be sure to wash your feet with soap and warm water each day. This is especially important if you go to communal locker rooms where you can easily pick up microorganisms while barefoot.

Noticed a skin problem on your foot? We can help assess your skin. Make an appointment today for a consultation at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your children’s feet to find the best solution for stinky feet! We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
October 11, 2018
Tags: blisters   Shoes   foot problems   toe walking   in-toeing   out-toeing   ingrown  

She loves to take walks but recently seems to want to stop earlier than before. She doesn’t seem to want to put shoes on and fights you when you try to convince her that she needs them.

He is usually running around and forcing you to play “catch the toddler” but lately, he doesn’t even want to walk. Instead, he wants you to carry him everywhere.

What might be going on?

Your toddler might not be able to properly express that he or she is feeling foot discomfort. Instead, you might hear whining or frustration.

The foot problems can be congenital (from birth), developmental, or even due to ill-fitting shoes. Check the following for signs that point to foot problems as the source of unexplained crankiness:

  • Resisting putting shoes on: This could mean that the shoes are uncomfortable. Make sure they are wearing the right size and make sure they have socks on with closed-toed shoes. After wearing shoes, do their feet have redness or blisters?
  • Toe and Toenail problems: Are the toenail beds inflamed? Are the toenails cracked? You might be cutting their toenails too short (making them ingrown), or you may not be cutting them often enough.
  • Walking abnormalities: If they seem to be walking abnormally, such as in-toeing or out-toeing, tripping often, or toe-walking, they may have foot problems. They can be traits that are inherited or developmental problems.
  • Limping or uneven stance: After an injury, your child might walk with a limp for a bit. However, if it seems to be a severe limp or a limp that lasts more than a few days, it’s important to have it checked out.

If your child is complaining of foot pain, come in for an assessment with our friendly board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy. Make an appointment today at the New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute at the Clark Podiatry Center. Your children will get the best treatments and foot care tips at our Clark, NJ office, which serves the surrounding Union County areas. We keep you walking!

By Clark Podiatry Center
December 18, 2017

When it comes to women’s foot problems, both genetics and fashion play major roles. It also accounts for why women seem to have more foot and ankles issues than men do. One such problem that affects women more than men is Haglund’s Deformity, also known as retrocalcaneal bursitis.

Commonly called “pump bump”, it is a condition characterized by a painful enlargement of the back of the heel bone. The irritation caused on the back of the heel bone results in a bony growth, which in turn can also cause inflammation of the bursa (fluid-filled sac meant to cushion against friction bones or joints). It can cause redness, pain, and swelling at the back of the heel.

Those with high arches, tight Achilles tendons, and/or a tendency to walk on the outside of the heel are more likely to develop this deformity. Shoes with a rigid back, like those in pumps (high heels, no strap, and cupped heels) can cause further irritation on the back of the heel. It’s often accompanied by blisters from where the shoe repeatedly rubs on the back of the heel.

Treatment options:

  • Heel pads, whether it be over-the-counter or custom orthotics, can help to reduce irritation to the back of the heel. Other inserts can also help to correct your gait or add support for high arches or a tight Achilles tendon.
  • Our podiatrist may also suggest topical or oral anti-inflammatory medications for relief as you get the symptoms under control.
  • Physical therapy might also be helpful to loosen tight heel cords.
  • If the symptoms are severe, our podiatrist might recommend immobilization in a brace or cast until symptoms subside.

If after you have tried non-surgical treatments and you are still suffering, or if an X-ray shows significant bony growth, our podiatrist may suggest surgery. However, this requires extensive recovery efforts, so it would be a last resort. Come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy to receive an assessment of your heel pain. Make an appointment today at Clark Podiatry Center to see us at our Clark, NJ office. We keep you walking.

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
December 06, 2017

Some of you may be happy that winter is here because of the start of the skiing or snowboarding season! It’s a great workout and if you push yourself, the thrill can be more than enough to sustain you for the rest of the year! Of course, we want you to have the safe and enjoyable time, so we’ve got some tips as to how you can prevent some foot and ankle injuries when you hit the slopes!

  • Use safety gear. This doesn’t just go for skiing or snowboarding boots. Even the most seasoned skier and snowboarders can end up in an accident that can lead to severe injuries. Helmets, goggles, gloves, ski poles, and other padding (for beginners) are essential to preventing major injuries, like broken bones.
  • Know your level. Pay attention to signs and be sure to go down trails that suit your level. When you or another skier gets out of control, the collision and resulting rolling can cause major injuries. If you accidentally end up on a more difficult slope, take it slow, or carry your skis/snowboard and walk down until you get to a more manageable point.
  • Make sure your boots and skis/snowboard fit you properly. Footwear should be snug so that it feels like it is part of your leg. If you feel like it is tightened to the point of losing circulation, loosen it a little bit. Repetitive use of boots that are too tight could lead to bruises and irritation or inflammation of nerves or tissues.  If they are loose or don’t move with you, you risk twisting your ankle, which could lead to a sprain
  • Keep toenails trimmed. Your shoes will be snug in the boots, and with the downward motion, your toes may become crammed into each other. Especially if you have curly toes or other toe deformities, you’ll want to keep your toenails trimmed so that they do not cut into the other toes. Cuts can become painful and infected if not cleaned and treated properly.
  • Wear warm socks. It’s important to wear warm, dry socks to prevent blisters and frostbite. You may want to bring multiple pairs with you to change into throughout your day of skiing or snowboarding. When socks become wet, either from snow or sweat, the cold can lead to frostbite, especially if you don’t come out of the boots for a while. Wet socks can also cause more friction between your skin, socks, and boots.

Are your feet beat up from shredding through the snow? Need some more support in your shoes? Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy can assess your feet and give them the treatment or orthotic support they need. Come see him at Clark Podiatry Center. Make an appointment to see us today at our Clark, NJ office

By Clark Podiatry Center
July 25, 2017
Tags: blisters   Orthotics   arch supports  

Not all shoes are created equal. The structure, material quality, and features of comfort and support vary from one shoe to the other. With all the heat and humidity lately, it’s tempting for you and your children to wear the most open-toed shoes (or even go barefoot) to keep cool. While sandals are usually better than flip-flops, not all are supportive for your children’s growing feet. Wearing sandals that do not have proper foot support can cause developmental problems as their bones and tissues continue to grow.

The following are some tips for caring for your children’s feet, and what shoes they should wear instead of flip-flops:

  • Beware of going barefoot outside – Going barefoot is good for children when walking around indoors. It encourages strong muscle development and you can more easily notice problems if any exist. However, children should wear shoes whenever they are outside as there is an increased risk of injury and contracting disease.
  • Stay away from flip-flops – Flip-flops in general are not very supportive or even necessarily safe to be walking around so much. The lack of support can leave you unstable and more prone to injury. Additionally, walking around in them for more than a distance of home to pool or pool to locker room can make your feet work harder and leave you with pain. Because children’s feet are still developing they need all the proper support before the bones fully set.
  • Look for these properties in sandals – Key components of supportive shoes for children are: arch supports, heel cupping, and shock absorption. As they continue to grow, arch and heel support will help their feet to grow normally, especially if they are flatfooted or pronating. Also, since children like to run around, shock absorption will help reduce risk of repetitive injury pain (or even stress fracture). Sandals that do no fit well can cause them blisters and make them trip, so make sure that they try the sandals on in store.
  • Sneakers are best – In most cases, supportive sneakers are the best shoes to wear. Find ones that have good support, but have breathable materials like mesh and cotton canvas. Don’t forget to have them wear socks with their sneakers – if sweating is an issue, you can carry around a spare pair of socks. Plus, the closed-toed nature of sneakers makes them less prone to sunburn! (The same goes for water shoes at the water park!)

Have a question about appropriate shoes for your children’s foot development? Or maybe they need some orthoses. Whatever the case, come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy. Make an appointment today at The New Jersey Children's Foot Heath Institute at Clark Podiatry Center to have your children’s feet assessed and treated with care. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns! We keep you walking!

 



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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470