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Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: arthritis

By Clark Podiatry Center
December 05, 2018
Tags: diabetes   arthritis   gout   ulcer   supportive shoes  

If you have recently begun to live with older loved ones or if they plan to move in with you soon, there are a few things to consider for their foot care. Seniors need a little bit more care because of the many problems they can experience in their feet. From arthritis and gout to osteoporosis and hip problems, the risk of injury or pain is higher.

Here are some ways you can make their feet (and their overall person) more comfortable as they live with you:

Around the Home

  • Mats: Anywhere your older loved one might spend time standing for a while, you should install some standing mats. It will reduce the impact on their feet and bones as they walk and stand. Think about locations such as in front of sinks!
  • Rugs/Carpeting: If your older loved one needs cushioning due to bone or joint issues, consider installing carpet in areas they will spend time (i.e., their bedroom). You may want some plush carpeting for the living room if they spend time with you there.
  • Safety bars: If they need some help using the bathroom, you may want to install safety bars along the wall near the toilet, as well as for getting in and out of the shower. They will help reduce the risk of falls that could be potentially life-threatening!
  • Grippy material on stairs: Do your older loved ones have to use the stairs? Reduce the risk of slipping and falling on hardwood stairs by adding grip tape to each step.
  • Trip hazards: Always keep trip hazards out of the way. Seniors using walkers or canes will need a clear path to the rooms they walk in and out of the most.

On their feet

  • Supportive shoes – Make sure when they are wearing shoes, the feet are well supported.  Cushioning, arch support, and heel cups will help them keep their feet stable and healthy.
  • Indoor/Outdoor Shoes/Slippers – Depending on the floors you have in the house, you might want to alter their footwear indoors. If you have hardwood floors, and your loved one is diabetic, you may want to make sure that they wear protective shoes with grippy rubber soles while indoors. However, if you have carpet, the grippy shoes would not work because they can trip on the piles. The same goes for the types of soles on any slippers they might wear indoors.

Daily foot care

  • Wash and inspect the feet every day. It is especially crucial for those who have neuropathy, such as diabetes. Because wounds can go unnoticed when they have loss of sensation, there is a chance that it can become an ulcer.

These tips can help your older loved one be more comfortable as they stay with you. If you have a concern about their foot health, come to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy. He can assess your feet, and find a solution to treat your pain. Come to see him at Clark Podiatry Center. Make an appointment at our Clark, NJ office so we can keep you and your family walking

By Clark Podiatry Center
September 26, 2018
Category: arthritis

Your feet and ankles each have 33 joints that allow you to move about freely. Curling and pointing your toes, standing on your tip toes, as well as walking or running in different directions are all doable thanks to those joints. But a diagnosis of arthritis can change all that. Once arthritis sets in, your joints can become stiff and painful. You can have days of severe inflammation, where you can barely move around, even in your own home.

That’s why we’ve come up with some tips to make it easier to live with arthritis in the feet:

  • Physical therapy and Foot Exercises: It may seem counterintuitive to exercise the feet, but it’s actually very helpful to perform low-impact exercises. Especially for those with gouty arthritis, exercise can help prevent uric acid buildup, which can cause a painful gout attack. Flexibility and mobility exercises like stretching and swimming can reduce the risk of painful inflammation on tendons and ligaments in the joints.
  • Wear supportive shoes. A lot of cushioning can help reduce the impact on the joints. Additionally, you can use orthotic inserts to add padding to joints that are particularly painful (e.g. big toe joint or back of the heel).
  • Orthotics. During your podiatry assessment, Dr. Macy might recommend custom orthotics for your feet, depending on how arthritis is affecting you.
  • Reduce or eliminate high-impact activities. The more high-impact activities (e.g. basketball, football, running) that you participate in, the more likely you are to experience inflammation around your joints (which absorb that impact). This can worsen symptoms, so look to alternative exercises and activities to stay physically active.
  • Schedule in periods of rest. Sometimes, life seems to be about “go, go, go”. However, schedule in periods of rest so that your joints can recover in between periods of walking or standing to reduce the risk of arthritis flare-ups.
  • Make your home more comfortable. Use cushioned mats around the house, wherever you’ll be standing around. For examples, in front of sinks, the oven, and counters where you might prepare food.
  • Eat nutritiously and maintain a healthy weight. Anti-inflammatory foods are a must and the less weight that your joints have to support, the better for preventing inflammation.
  • Reduce stress. Stress tends to make inflammation worse in your body. Find ways to reduce stress, such as meditation and getting foot massages.

Take good care of your arthritic feet! If you’ve been experiencing joint pain in the feet, come in for an assessment! We can help you determine how you can best treat your condition. Make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all of Union County! We keep you walking!

Also known as Adult-Acquired Flat Foot or Tibialis Posterior Tendonitis, this condition results in a flattened arch in the foot. Those affected might experience symptoms such as pain along the inside of the ankle and foot, as well as a foot deformity with a shifted heel bone. Left untreated, it can cause chronic pain and severe deformity, making it hard to find shoes that fit comfortably.

What causes it?

  • Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD) – This is one of the most common causes of painful progressive flat foot. When there is inflammation of the posterior tibial tendon, or if it is damaged or torn, it can no longer properly hold up the arches of the feet.
  • Health issuesObesity (excess weight that the feet have to bear), Diabetes (reduced sensation can lead to weakened foot structures and eventually lead to Charcot Foot), and Hypertension (reduced blood supply to the tendon).
  • Arthritis: When joints and bones are affected by arthritis, they can become weakened and allow for a collapsed arch.
  • Injury: Blunt trauma can cause the issues that lead to a fallen arch, including inflamed or torn tendon, or structural deformity in the feet.
  • Flat foot since childhood – Some folks are born with flat feet, and they may not always cause problems until later in life when the arch collapses.

What can be done to treat it?

  • Orthotics, including custom supportive inserts, specially made shoes, immobilizing casts, or supportive braces. These assistive devices can help to correct your gait and posture. They can prevent your feet from rolling inward from having flat feet, as well as relieve pressure on the arches as you walk and stand.  
  • Physical therapy can be helpful to strengthen the soft tissue in the feet to correct gait.
  • Icing and NSAIDs can help relieve pain, swelling, and inflammation.
  • Treat health conditions like obesity (weight loss), diabetes, hypertension, and arthritis.
  • In rare cases, surgery might be an option to treat any posterior tibial tendon issues, or if there are any structural bone issues.

If you suspect that your arches have fallen and if you have pain along the inside of your feet or ankles, make an appointment today at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your feet to find the best treatments or solutions for your feet. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!

By Clark Podiatry Center
July 18, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: arthritis   swelling   RICE method   gout   healthy diet  

If you or a loved one suffers from gout, you know that it can be a crippling condition. This intense form of arthritis can suddenly cause pain, swelling, and redness in a joint – most commonly in the big toe joint. It can cause pain to most of the forefoot and even in the ankles and/or knees as well.

NOTE: If you feel that you might have gout, make sure that you have made an appointment with your doctor and received a proper diagnosis.

After some time, gout patients may get really good at recognizing symptoms of an oncoming attack. You may feel sensations of burning or tingling, stiff or sore joints, and eventually, redness, swelling, and pain. For some, the pain can come suddenly in the middle of the night, causing you to wake up.

Gout attacks generally occur after drinking more than usual, eating foods that are high in purine (like liver or mussels), being dehydrated, ingesting a lot of sugar, or as a side effect of taking certain medications.

When you feel an attack coming on, try the following:

  • RICE method: Rest, Ice, Compression*, Elevation to reduce symptoms. *If even the littlest bit of contact with the gout joint causes you pain, you may not want to use compression.
  • Drink a LOT of water. Hydration will help you flush out the buildup of uric acid in your joints.
  • Take NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) to alleviate pain and reduce inflammation.
  • If possible, get moving. Low-impact exercise can help to get blood and fluids circulating to reduce the uric acid build up. Even doing some exercises while resting the affected foot/feet in bed can help your symptoms.

When a gout attack is in full swing, you may be in too much pain to do much. You’ll want to have friends or family members help you with daily tasks and take it easy in general. Eat a nutritious and healthy diet and drink lots of water. Additionally, use cushiony, soft slippers when you do need to walk around (like going to the bathroom) to alleviate pain.

If you experience more than 2 or 3 attacks per year, you’ll probably want to take prescription gout medications. Make an appointment today at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your feet to find the best treatments or solutions for your feet. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!

By Clark Podiatry Center
March 20, 2018
Category: Bunions
Tags: Bunions   Hammertoes   Shoes   arthritis   bony spur   bunion surgery  

You may have noticed a bony growth coming from your big toe joint. You weren’t sure if your bunions were getting larger, but made some changes anyway. You’ve changed your shoes to have a roomier toe box, used bunion pads, and even tried some splints to help keep your big toes facing forward.

Lately, however, your big toe joint seems to become irritated more frequently and more easily. The bony spur has been getting larger, and your foot looks a bit more deformed than you remember. How are you going to feel comfortable with wearing open-toed shoes or sandals now, without embarrassment?

Whatever the cause of your bunion, whether it’s genetics, arthritis, or the types of shoes you wear, the earlier you treat it, the easier the treatment. The longer you leave it untreated, the more likely it is that it will cause further issues on other parts of the feet, like your big toe joint, smaller toes (like with hammertoes), and even the balls of your feet.

In most cases, we encourage non-surgical treatment of bunions, especially because it’s not an easy road to recovery after the invasive surgery. While non-surgical treatment will not be a cure for the bunions, they can be helpful in preventing worsening symptoms and providing pain relief.

When the bunion problem becomes very severe, causing chronic pain and discomfort, the only solution is to turn to bunion surgery. Depending on how your bunion affects you, you can remove the bunion growth, realign the big toe joint, or if it’s due to arthritis, replace the joint with screws and plates. The procedure may be a short outpatient treatment, but the recovery could take 6 weeks to 4 months as the bones heal and adapt.

Bunion surgery is a last resort treatment option. To see if your bunion problem can be solved with surgery, make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Brandon Macy, DPM at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet and give you options to make your travel plans possible. Come see him at our Clark, NJ office, which serves the surrounding Union County areas.

 



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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470