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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: achilles tendonitis

By Clark Podiatry Center
October 02, 2018
Category: Pregnancy

During pregnancy, many things change. Your body reacts to the internal and external environment differently. And as the body begins to prepare for the last few months of pregnancy and giving birth, it retains more fluids and even allows for bones to shift. It’s amazing what the body is capable of doing!

Here’s what to look for during pregnancy, for baby and mama’s feet.

Baby’s Feet:

  • Feet will begin to form with separated toes at about 10 weeks
  • They will use the feet to help them move and explore the amniotic sac
  • Closer to the end of the pregnancy, toe or foot deformities can be detected, such as clubfoot, overlapping toes, amniotic band syndrome, or polydactyly. Don’t worry though, as these are not common occurrences.

Speak to our podiatrist at Clark Podiatry Center if you have concerns about your baby’s foot development in the womb.

Mother’s Feet:

  • Water retention and natural weight gain will cause edema. The swelling can cause discomfort in the feet and even change sensation.
  • The extra weight that the mother carries can flatten the arches and cause the ankles to roll inward, as with overpronation. Over time, this can cause chronic issues like plantar fasciitis and/or Achilles tendonitis.
  • Cramping can occur in the feet and/or legs as part of pregnancy. The exact cause is unknown but stretching, walking, hydration, and comfortable footwear can help prevent cramps.
  • As the feet change, pressure points can change as well. Pain can occur in the heel, arch, or balls of feet as a consequence of problems like edema and overpronation.

To find relief from these symptoms and changes, try some of the following:

  • Rest often so that your feet do not have to overwork. Schedule in times to rest.
  • Use compression socks and elevate your feet to reduce swelling.
  • Wear comfortable shoes with good supportive features and cushioning.
  • Stay active to increase circulation of fluids back up from your feet and ankles, and to prevent cramping.

If you notice that your feet are swelling unevenly or excessively, you might have a clot. Get medical care immediately. With other mild concerns, come to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy for an assessment throughout your pregnancy. Make an appointment today to have your feet treated with care. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all of Union County! We keep you walking!

By Clark Podiatry Center
August 29, 2018
Category: Shoes

An important aspect of foot care is to make sure that you have good shoe habits. That includes long-term shoe maintenance and wearing them properly so that they provide maximum support to your feet.

Here are some habits you should adopt, as well as some habits you should drop!

DOs:

  • Keep your shoes clean, which includes keeping your feet clean. This will help prevent the growth of microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi that could rot your shoes and make them smell! You might use a shoe spray or an activated charcoal bag to absorb moisture if your feet tend to sweat a lot. Additionally, keeping them clean of dirt (and in the winter, of rock salt) can reduce the rate at which they degrade.
  • Wear socks with shoes, especially closed-toe shoes. You are more likely to have bacterial or fungal growth/infection without socks to absorb some of the moisture from your feet. Got hyperhidrosis? You may want to bring an extra pair of socks with you to change into midday.
  • Unlace your shoes before taking them off to reduce wear and tear on the materials that make up the structure of your shoe. Overstretching the material can reduce the supportiveness of the shoes and prevent your shoes from fitting with the proper snugness for your feet.

DO NOTs:

  • DON’T wear one pair of shoes every single day.  Not only are you wearing them down quicker, they can also become smelly and harbor bacteria and fungi, as these microorganisms thrive in damp, dark, warm surfaces. Try to rotate between at least two pairs of shoes to allow them to dry out completely. Additionally, do not put shoes in an enclosed space right away. Instead, allow them to air out overnight and then put them away if need be.
  • DON’T fold shoe backs. Some shoes have flexible backs that can forcibly be folded down if you’re in a hurry to get out the door. After a few instances of folding the back, you will notice that they stay folded down. This means that the structure of the shoe becomes compromised and your feet may have to strain more to remain stable. You might suffer from chronic overuse injuries like plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis.
  • DON’T drag your feet. Dragging the feet will wear down the outer soles of your shoes and can also make you more prone to tripping over your own feet or a curb. You can sustain an injury like an ankle sprain or broken toe if you’re not careful!
  • DON’T continue to wear shoes that hurt. If shoes hurt your feet, you can either donate them or try adding cushioning with orthotic inserts to better support your feet.

Have your shoes turned on you and started causing you pain? Let us help you find a solution to your foot or ankle woes. Make an appointment today at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your feet to find the best treatments or solutions for your feet. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
May 30, 2018
Category: Foot safety

It’s summertime! You might be going (or at least thinking of going) to the gym more often now to get your body beach-ready. But before you go too crazy exercising, consider the following tips for keeping your feet and ankles (and the rest of your body) safe at the gym:

Wear appropriate gym shoes. One of the most important ways you can protect your feet and ankles is to wear shoes that are right for the type of workout you are doing.

  • If you are primarily doing cardio, you’ll want to wear running shoes that have extra cushioning to reduce the impact on your joints.
  • If you are weight-lifting, you want stable shoes with a raised heel.
  • If you will be doing a variety of different exercises, including plyometrics, calisthenics, weight-training, etc., cross-training shoes will be best.

Use gym equipment safely and be wary of hidden dangers. Whether you will be working out at your home gym or fitness club, you can prevent injury if you use equipment safely.

  • If you don’t know how to use a machine, ask a staff member or look at a manual.
  • Do not alter equipment unless it is made to do so. For example, do not add or remove weights from the weight stack.
  • Make sure that your workout area is not wet from spilled water, pooled sweat, or recent mopping. If the floor seems to be a bit slippery, use a rubber mat or change your shoes to ones with more traction.

Use a spotter. If you will be lifting heavy weights, it’s best to have a spotter. You may accidentally misstep and tweak your foot or ankle.

Increase speed/intensity slowly. Whether you are sprinting, squatting, or spinning, make sure you increase the intensity of your workout slowly. Dramatic increases in speed or intensity can cause excessive strain on your soft tissues. It can aggravate overuse problems like sesamoiditis or Achilles tendonitis.

Wash feet and use flip-flops. It’s best to shower after a sweaty workout, but this is especially true for your feet if you did your work out barefoot. Additionally, if you are walking around barefoot in communal locker rooms, you should wash your feet as well to prevent contagious disease like Athlete’s Foot. In fact, it’s best to wear non-slip flip-flops when in the communal shower.

If you sustain an injury while working out, be sure to use the RICE method to find pain relief until you can make an appointment to see us at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your feet and ankles to find the best treatment. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!

By Clark Podiatry Center
May 23, 2018
Category: Shoes

You traded in your high heels for flats, because it’s probably the better decision. Or is it?

While it’s true that most high heels are not supportive enough for the feet and can cause ongoing foot problems, it’s not necessarily true that flats are the antidote. In most cases, flats are probably less problematic, but that depends on whether or not they have supportive features.

Because both high heels and flats are usually worn with fashion in mind, they tend to lack supportive features that are necessary to keep feet healthy and pain-free. High heels can cause pain in the balls of the feet and the toes, but flats can cause pain along the bottom of the feet. So if you have foot pain even when you thought you remedied the problems caused by high heels, it’s probably due to the flatness of flats.

Flats can be your arch nemesis if they lack the following supportive features:

Arch support - Most flats have flat inner soles. This can cause excessive straining for the plantar fascia, which aggravates any problems that folks with fallen arches or flat feet might have, like plantar fasciitis.

Supportive heel cups and solid heel contours - When heels are not supported with specific heel grooves, they may be prone to sliding around, which can result in blisters and calluses, or Achilles tendonitis as feet can under- or over-pronate.

Cushioning in the soles - Most inner soles tend to have a very thin lining and lack cushioning. This can increase the impact felt by the feet, ankles, knees, hips, and back.

Roomy toe boxes - Many flats tend to become narrow in the front and are tight around the feet because they do not have straps or laces to keep them secured on the feet. Tight toe boxes can cause problems like hammertoes or worsen pre-existing problems like bunions.

This doesn’t mean that you should never buy flats. Instead of swearing off all flats, you can find flats with built-in support. Alternatively, you can use over-the-counter orthotic inserts. However, if you need custom-made orthotics, we can help! Make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet and give them the treatment or orthotic support they need. Come see him at our Clark, NJ office.

By Clark Podiatry Center
April 25, 2018
Category: Laser therapy

Some of the worst villains in movie history use “lasers” in their plan to destroy the world. In the podiatry world, however, we use lasers for good, not for evil. When the terrible, horrible symptoms of pain and inflammation wreak havoc on your feet and ankles, you look to lasers for help.

Laser therapy is typically an option after conservative treatments prove to be unsuccessful. It uses a focused light beam to stimulate healing by encouraging cell metabolism. The treatment is easy and healing time is reduced. What would normally take months to properly heal now takes only a few treatments (about 10-12) of about 10 minutes per session.

For foot pain, a laser is commonly used to treat:

  • Plantar fasciitis – arch or heel pain due to strained plantar fascia ligaments; usually affects people with flat feet or high arches.
  • Achilles tendonitis – heel pain in the back of the heel bone (Achilles) due to a strained foot or ankle sprain; often due to over or under pronation.
  • Neuromas – numbness or pain due to thickened nerve tissue in a specific area; typically experienced if you wear shoes that put excessive force on a specific part of your feet, such as the balls of the feet.

If you’ve been suffering from foot pain, well why wouldn’t you want fast, easy, painless treatment?

But did you know that a laser can also be used to fight the battle against fungal toenails! While the fungal infection might not be causing terrible, horrible pain, they could be the cause of your ugly, brittle, discolored toenails. Unfortunately, you probably picked it up from a family member or from walking barefoot in the gym locker room.

If left untreated, the fungal infection can spread to the surrounding skin on the feet and cause a rash or scaly dry skin. It can spread from one part of the foot to the other because fungal toenails and Athlete’s foot are caused by the same fungus. Laser therapy can be used to treat the toenails so that new toenails do not grow back with a fungal infection!

So if you’ve got a persistent heel pain or fungal infection that won’t respond to conservative treatments, come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy for an assessment. If laser therapy is right for you, we can get started on treatments right away. Using orthotics in conjunction with laser therapy might be a treatment option too! Make an appointment today to have your feet treated with care. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all of Union County! We keep you walking!



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Call Today 732-382-3470

1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470