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Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: Shoes

By Clark Podiatry Center
April 09, 2019

It probably won’t be a surprise to you that much of a child’s foot health is inherited. High or no arches, tendencies to walk bow legged or the development of calluses are just some of what a child can expect if their parents suffered from the same. One common malady, however, is something called Severs Disease. Also known as Calcaneal apophysitis, Severs Disease is the inflammation of the growth plate in the heel of growing and active children. Severs disease causes pain and a slight swelling around the heel making it difficult to walk or run.

Treating Severs disease includes the following:

  • Reduce activities – Have your child immediately refrain from any activity that causes heel pain.
  • Ice – apply ice to the heel for 20 minutes 3 times a day.
  • Orthotics – children with high arches, no arch, or bowlegs an orthotic may be needed to alleviate the stress on the heel. See your podiatrist for this.
  • Short leg casts – in more dramatic cases children may need to have a short leg cast to temporarily rest the Achilles heel.
  • Shoes – wearing more elevated and cushioning shoes.
  • Stretching – stretching the Achilles tendon can loosen the affected area.
  • Pain meds – using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain medications like ibuprofen and naproxen can help. Male sure to only use as directed and see your podiatrist if you have any questions.

As long as the treatment works, your child can go back to their active self. It is not uncommon, though, for the malady to return unless long term care such as the above is taken. Some of the sports which would be prone to this are running, basketball, tennis and gymnastics, but any activity that requires pounding their feet on a hard surface can induce Severs.

If you or your child has heel pain or any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
April 01, 2019

If you’ve just become a new parent, life has suddenly become full of wonderful surprises. Making sure your child grows up happy and healthy will be one of your priorities and keeping track of your child’s foot health is important. So, what can you expect?

Unlike an adult’s, a newborn’s feet will be much more padded and flexible allowing for the growth of bones and muscles. A baby’s feet are often blue, wrinkled and peeling having been inside the mother’s womb covered in amniotic fluid. Do not fret, though. They will naturally begin to pinken as they get warm.

Things to look for:

  • Proper Hip structure – making sure the hips are not dislocated.
  • Neurological response – the pediatrician will tickle the soles to see if the infant responds.
  • Clubfoot – abnormally small feet with toes pointed inward.
  • Metatarsus adductus or ‘C’ foot – a condition where the big toe points toward the other foot.
  • Extra toes – a common occurrence that is easily remedied with surgery.
  • Web feet – also a common occurrence remedied with surgery.

While all the above are possible, they are not automatic, so don’t be alarmed. Your podiatrist is specifically trained to assess and treat where needed.

While it is fine to look forward to seeing your child take their first step, don’t be too anxious. Each child will develop on their own and rushing them could set back their efforts.  Most children don’t start walking until they are 8 to 18 months old. Until then, it is important for them to be able to stretch their legs and move their toes. It is perfectly fine for toddlers to go barefoot as they refine their balance, posture, and coordination. Very important is the transfer of information from the soles of the child’s feet to their brain.

When it comes to shoes, a child’s feet should be professionally measured for length and width. It is not uncommon for shoe sizes to change every few months as feet will grow rapidly in the first few years. This is the beginning of a new chapter in your life. Enjoy it.

If you have any concerns with your child’s feet or their development or any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us.  Our podiatrist, Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
March 27, 2019

There is no better time to begin taking care of our feet than when we are a child. From the very beginning it is crucial our children maintain good foot health and knowing which problems are most likely to occur early on can help greatly. So, what are some of the more prevalent issues with our children’s feet? Good question.

As an infant, it is very important for children to be able to move and stretch their feet as their bones are growing. Undue pressure can damage this and can lead to much more serious problems later on. Also make sure that socks and shoes are not too tight. Don’t rush a child into walking. He or she will develop on their own according to their individual needs, but do keep an eye on their gait so if some type of intervention is needed, it can be addressed immediately.

It is not uncommon for children to inherit many of the same problems their parents have. These include:

  • Flat feet - Poor arch support can often be passed on to a child but can also be treated.
  • Heel problems – problems with the Achilles tendon can cause discomfort.
  • Pigeon toes – walking with your feet and toes pointed inward.
  • Knock knees – knees that touch each other as you walk can and often is treated with braces.
  • Bowlegs - a curvature of the legs which can be indicative of other more complex issues like Rickets caused by a lack of vitamin D and Blount’s disease or abnormal growth on the top of the tibia.

Indications your children may have foot issues can include:

  • Tired legs – this may indicate flat feet.
  • Difficulty in sports – not being able to compete may indicate issues with their feet and gait.
  • Tripping and falling – the inability to keep their balance.
  • Foot shyness – when a child doesn’t want anyone to see their feet for the fear of embarrassment.
  • Pain - pain is never a good sign and can indicate poor fitting shoes, bad bone development or other more serious conditions.

Early recognition is very important for our children’s foot health. If you believe your child may suffer from any of the above conditions or if you have any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
March 05, 2019
Category: Heel pain
Tags: x-ray   Flat Feet   Plantar Fasciitis   Orthotics   Shoes   stretch   MRI  

The foot is one of the most complicated parts of the human body. With 19 separate muscles, 26 bones, 33 joints, and at least 107 ligaments and tendons, it is easy to see why taking care of your feet is very important. One of the common ailments many people experience is called Plantar fasciitis, a painful inflammation of connective tissue that runs across the bottom of the foot connecting the heel bone to the rest of the foot.  Plantar Fasciitis is commonly experienced by people whose feet constantly pound hard, flat surfaces and are often caused by Heel Spurs or bony protrusions of calcium on the heel.

Risk Factors for Plantar Fasciitis

  • Age - Between the ages of 40 and 60.
  • Diabetes
  • Exercise -  Activities that put a lot of stress on your heel - long-distance running, jumping activities, basketball, ballet, and aerobic dance.
  • Foot mechanics - Having flat feet, a high arch or an abnormal pattern of walking that distributes weight unevenly on the foot.
  • Obesity - Being overweight.
  • Occupation - Factory workers, teachers, construction workers, athletes, nurses and others who walk or stand a lot on hard surfaces.

Some of the ways to avoid Plantar Fasciitis

  • Lose weight.
  • Always wear appropriate athletic shoes.
  • Wear shoes that are supportive, have good arch support and absorb shock well.
  • Stretch and warm up before exercising.
  • See your doctor if you suspect you have Plantar Fasciitis.

If you do see your doctor, there are several ways to treat the ailment depending on the severity of the inflammation. They include:

  • Examination- Physical examination of the inflamed site.
  • X-Ray or MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) to see if there is a damaged nerve or fracture.
  • Ultrasound
  • Medicine - Doctor prescribed mostly over the counter pain meds.
  • Stretching - ligaments, tendons, and muscles before exercise especially.  
  • Therapy -  Physical Therapy, Night Splints and the use of Orthotics.
  • Surgery - At times this may be necessary if other methods are not successful.

If you have any questions or would like to see a podiatrist, please make an appointment with our friendly staff. Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470. If you have concerns with your children’s feet, Dr. Macy specializes in pediatrics and can assess your children’s feet at New Jersey Children’s Foot Health Institute.

By Clark Podiatry Center
February 06, 2019

Your children grow up in what seems like a blink of the eye. They start to crawl, take their first steps, are running, and jumping, and before you know it, tying their own shoelaces! Then it’s off to college!

Okay, so it’s not quite that quick, but time sure can fly by. That’s why we want to encourage you to start teaching your children to take care of their feet early. Children are pretty perceptive and can learn by example starting from a young age. Take advantage of the years when they are soaking up knowledge and teach them some of the following ways to take care of their own feet:

  • Washing feet – This is a skill they can learn as they learn to wash their bodies during bath time. Have them reach their toes while they are sitting, and gently rub, rub, rub. Remind them to clean the tops and bottoms of their feet, as well as in between the toes and under the toenails. Teach them to properly dry their feet and moisturize if their skin is dry.
  • Wearing socks with shoes – Other than with sandals, teach them that they need to always wear socks before they put on their shoes. Children’s feet can get just as sweaty and stinky as our feet, so it’s important that they wear socks. That way, their shoes will not become stinky! Additionally, wearing shoes without socks can lead to blisters, corns, and calluses, which can be painful for your little one.
  • Understanding how their feet fit into shoes – As your children’s feet grow, observe their feet when they seem to either not put their shoes on, or want to take them off quickly. Look for any redness or swelling as these signs can indicate that shoes are too small. When you buy new shoes, have them try the shoes on and ask them if their toes have room to wiggle. Are the feet sliding around in the shoes? Do they feel snug or are they clunky? As they get older, they will recognize whether or not shoes fit them correctly.
  • Feeling out when they need to have their toenails trimmed – It’s not always easy to be on top of when your children need to have their toenails trimmed. When they are old enough, you can teach them to trim their own toenails, but before then, you’ll need to teach them an approximate length in which they should come to you for a trim. When the whites reach the edge of their toes, or when they feel the nails hit the top or front of their shoes (which can cause ingrown toenails) are both good times to trim toenails.
  • Foot exercises – Children generally get a lot of foot exercise from their general playtime. However, it doesn’t hurt to teach them some exercises by example. When watching TV together, you can help them with motor skills by doing foot circles or testing their ABCs in a silly way – draw them with your feet!

If you need tips on how to help your child with foot care, come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your child’s feet at New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute and find the best treatment for any concern you may have for your child’s feet. Make an appointment at our Clark, NJ office so we can keep your child walking.



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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470