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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: High Heels

By Clark Podiatry Center
September 12, 2018
Category: Shoes

Did you know that the shoes you wear might be the reason that your bunions are getting worse? Without the proper supportive features, your footwear can be causing your feet to work harder to grip the shoes for stability.

Shoe features to avoid:

  • Pointy shoes – When footwear forces the front of your feet into an unnatural shape, a bony growth (spur) can appear at the side of your big toe joint to support your foot. The big toe begins to turn more toward the smaller toes, instead of pointing straight ahead.
  • Narrow/Tight shoes – When shoes are too tight in the front, and there’s no room to wiggle the toes, they can become very cramped. This also forces the big toe into unnatural positions and can cause irritation to the big toe joint.
  • Thong sandals or flip-flops – When the toes are not encased, they become unstable and can slide around. As the feet work harder to maintain stability and grip harder in flip-flops, bunions can become aggravated. The inflammation and positioning can cause the deformity to worsen over time.
  • High heels – Shoes with high heels can put excessive pressure on the forefoot, especially on the big toe joint. A bony spur can push out to help support that pressure.
  • Flat shoes with no arch support – Those with flat feet or low arches are more likely to put pressure on the big toe joint. If you will be wearing flat shoes, make sure they have arch support or at least an orthotic insert to help with flat feet.

After an assessment by our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy, he might suggest custom orthotics for your shoes. He’ll also recommend shoes with a roomy toe box and good arch and heel support. Read our guidelines about what to look for when purchasing shoes that are healthy for the feet.

Make an appointment with Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He will assess your feet to keep you walking. Our office in Clark, NJ serves the Westfield area and surrounding Union County. 

By Clark Podiatry Center
April 18, 2018
Category: Common Treatments
Tags: corns   calluses   Bunions   Hammertoes   High Heels   Shoes   orthotic   deformities   gaits  

Do you have hardened bumps on your toes or patches of thickened skin on the bottom of your feet? Because of the various surfaces on which your feet walk, they have a way to protect themselves from harm. Skin begins to thicken in spots where they experience a lot of pressure or friction.

Who is likely to get corns and calluses?

Corns: Those with foot deformities like hammertoes, curly toes, claw toes, or bunions are more likely to experience corns. This is especially the case if you wear shoes that are too tight or too short. Additionally, those who stand or walk for long periods of time can experience constant friction. Corns are usually localized to a small, specific location, such as the toes.

Calluses: Those who wear high heels, have lost fat padding on the balls of the feet, or have abnormal gaits can experience constant pressure on certain wider parts of the feet, like at the base of the balls of the feet.

Should you treat corns and calluses at home? Or go see a podiatrist?

You may have noticed some over-the-counter corn and/or callus medications. Before applying any type of medications, try some of these following adjustments before corns or calluses become painful or to relieve painful symptoms:

  • Try wearing shoes that are snug, but not too tight. You shouldn’t buy shoes expecting that they will stretch out. Make sure you always wear socks with shoes to reduce friction on the skin of the feet.
  • There are pads you can apply to the areas of the shoes that seem to cause friction against the skin of the feet.

When the abovementioned tips don’t do trick, you may need to have corns or calluses filed down or removed by a podiatrist.  They may use one or more of the following:

  • Trim down or cut away thickened skin with a scalpel. Trying it at home can lead to an infection, so it’s best not to try this at home.
  • Use salicylic acid in patches or gels to remove corns or calluses.
  • Prescribe or custom-make orthotic inserts to cushion problems that develop from deformities or bony protrusions.

If your corns or calluses are painful and you need help treating them, make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Brandon Macy, DPM at Clark Podiatry Center. He can find the best treatment options to get you feeling better. Come see him at our Clark, NJ office, which serves the surrounding Union County areas.

By Brandon Macy, D.P.M
November 18, 2013
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Footwear   High Heels   Shoes   Proper Footwear  

HeelsWhile high heel shoes may look stylish or complement your favorite outfit, they are rarely the best option for a woman's feet. According to a study by the American Podiatric Medical Association, 39 percent of women wear high heels every day; of the women who wear heels daily, three out of four reported foot problems. Despite the numbers, many women continue to underestimate the health risks associated with high heels.

High heel shoes disrupt the body's alignment, crowd the toes and force the body's weight onto the ball of the foot. Wearing heels can contribute to a variety of foot and ankle problems, including:

  • Achilles tendonitis. The Achilles tendon and calf muscles tighten and shorten as the front of the foot moves down in relation to the heel. This causes stress and painful inflammation of the Achilles tendon.
  • Bunions. Narrow-toed shoes can cause a bony growth on the joint at the base of the big toe. The bunion forces the big toe to slant in toward the other toes, resulting in discomfort, blisters, corns and calluses.
  • Hammertoes. A narrow toe box crowds the smaller toes into a bent, claw-like position at the middle joint.
  • Metatarsalgia. Continued high heel wear can lead to joint pain in the ball of the foot as a result of heels forcing the body's weight to be redistributed.
  • Ankle injuries. Because heels impair balance and increase the risk of falling, ankle sprains and fractures are common.
  • Pump Bump. The rigid back of a pump-style shoe can cause pressure that irritates the heel bone, creating a bony enlargement known as Haglund's deformity.
  • Neuromas. A narrow toe box and high heel can compress and create a thickening of tissue around a nerve between the third and fourth toes, leading to pain and numbness in the toes.

Still not willing to ditch the heels? There are ways to relieve some of the damaging effects of high heels.

  • Avoid heels taller than 2 inches
  • Choose thicker, more stable heels. Thicker heels are still stylish, plus they lessen the stress on your feet and provide better shock absorption.
  • If you must wear heels, wear your gym shoes or flats for commuting and change into your heels once you arrive to your destination.
  • Stretch and massage your calf, heel, and foot muscles. This helps relax the muscles and tendons and prevents them from tightening and shortening.
  • Avoid shoes with pointed toes

High heel shoes can cause pain and foot deformities that can last a lifetime. So the next time you go to slip on your heels for a long day at work or a night out, consider the consequences and rethink your options. If foot pain persists, visit Clark Podiatry Center for treatment.



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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470