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Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: Footwear

By Clark Podiatry Center
March 24, 2020
Category: Foot Health Tips

We’re all spending much more time at home these days as we seek to limit the spread of the coronavirus. While we work from home, keep up with our children, or step outside for a moment, it’s still important to protect our feet. Clark Podiatry Center has a few safety tips that you and your family can practice during this time. Healthy feet and ankles are an important part of your overall health, too.

Stepping outside? Wear shoes.

Whether it’s a quick trip to the mailbox or a phone call in the backyard, always wear shoes. If you have diabetes, it is even more important to avoid walking barefoot. A small cut or bruise can have dangerous consequences and may also lead to a foot ulcer. Keep a pair of shoes by the door as a reminder.

Keep up with your foot hygiene

Don’t skip foot hygiene maintenance. It includes daily check-ups and keeping your feet clean and dry. Healthy foot care routines are a great way to prevent foot issues or detect them earlier. If you’re wearing socks or shoes in the house, be sure to let your shoes air out each night to prevent a fungal toenail infection. Also, don’t wear the same pair of socks to avoid smelly feet.

Fall proof your house

There are simple things that you can do to reduce your chances of falling or tripping in your house. It includes switching out slippery rugs with non-slip options or rearranging furniture that might be a hazard. Fall-proofing your home may also include choosing footwear wisely. Avoid wearing slippers without non-slip soles. Also, if you choose socks, look for those to be non-slip, as well.

While you enjoy the comforts of home, be sure to keep up the great work of monitoring and caring for your feet. If you have any questions or concerns, make an appointment with Dr. Brandon A. Macy, a board-certified podiatrist. He is located at our Clark, New Jersey office. Call (732) 382-3470. For concerns about your children, the New Jersey’s Children’s Foot Health Institute is also part of Clark Podiatry Center.

By Clark Podiatry Center
October 03, 2019
Category: Exercise

Walking is a basic human activity and has been for centuries. As we make our way to and from destinations, it is estimated that an average person takes 7,500 steps in a day, and if you live to the age of 80, you will likely take close to 216,000,000 steps. Considering this, keeping an eye on your foot health is very important.

Some of the benefits of walking include:

  • Burning calories – every mile walked you burn off 100 calories
  • Heart rate – walking increases the heart rate strengthening the heart muscle pumping blood to necessary parts of the body
  • Blood sugar – helps keep your blood sugar level stable
  • Cholesterol levels – works to reduce cholesterol levels
  • Improve circulation – pumping of blood increases the size of blood vessels
  • Mood – walking is also said to improve mood and may relieve some aspects of depression

Overall, walking is a very good activity, but if you haven’t done a lot, you need to see your doctor or podiatrist before you take up a regimen. Sudden physical exertion can also be a stressor if done too intensely depending on your overall physical condition.

Another thing a podiatrist can do is help you find the right shoe. Depending on your feet, you may need to have an orthotic to help you walk properly as some people have different ways of walking. Two different ways of walking include:

  • Pronator – have flat feet and roll their ankles inward. Pronators need a sturdier shoe
  • Supinator - have high arches and need shoes that provide cushioning for shock absorption

Not all shoes or footwear provide the same support, so choosing the right shoe or sneaker is very important for your foot health. Most running shoes provide good support but must be fit carefully to your feet. Measuring your feet at the end of the day is best because your foot is slightly swollen from walking all day and will allow you room for a comfortable fit.

Your podiatrist will also check for any issues that you have that need to be compensated for such as corns and calluses, bunions, hammertoe, heel spurs, or other.

If you have any questions about walking or have any other concerns about your feet, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
October 02, 2018
Category: Pregnancy

During pregnancy, many things change. Your body reacts to the internal and external environment differently. And as the body begins to prepare for the last few months of pregnancy and giving birth, it retains more fluids and even allows for bones to shift. It’s amazing what the body is capable of doing!

Here’s what to look for during pregnancy, for baby and mama’s feet.

Baby’s Feet:

  • Feet will begin to form with separated toes at about 10 weeks
  • They will use the feet to help them move and explore the amniotic sac
  • Closer to the end of the pregnancy, toe or foot deformities can be detected, such as clubfoot, overlapping toes, amniotic band syndrome, or polydactyly. Don’t worry though, as these are not common occurrences.

Speak to our podiatrist at Clark Podiatry Center if you have concerns about your baby’s foot development in the womb.

Mother’s Feet:

  • Water retention and natural weight gain will cause edema. The swelling can cause discomfort in the feet and even change sensation.
  • The extra weight that the mother carries can flatten the arches and cause the ankles to roll inward, as with overpronation. Over time, this can cause chronic issues like plantar fasciitis and/or Achilles tendonitis.
  • Cramping can occur in the feet and/or legs as part of pregnancy. The exact cause is unknown but stretching, walking, hydration, and comfortable footwear can help prevent cramps.
  • As the feet change, pressure points can change as well. Pain can occur in the heel, arch, or balls of feet as a consequence of problems like edema and overpronation.

To find relief from these symptoms and changes, try some of the following:

  • Rest often so that your feet do not have to overwork. Schedule in times to rest.
  • Use compression socks and elevate your feet to reduce swelling.
  • Wear comfortable shoes with good supportive features and cushioning.
  • Stay active to increase circulation of fluids back up from your feet and ankles, and to prevent cramping.

If you notice that your feet are swelling unevenly or excessively, you might have a clot. Get medical care immediately. With other mild concerns, come to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy for an assessment throughout your pregnancy. Make an appointment today to have your feet treated with care. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all of Union County! We keep you walking!

Did you know that the Achilles tendon (strong fibrous tissue that attaches the calf muscle to the back of the heel bone) is the largest tendon in the body? Without proper functioning Achilles tendons, we wouldn’t be able to walk or run! And because it is so involved in our daily lives as well as in the movements that playing sports entails, it’s also one of the most likely tendons to be inflamed or injured/ruptured.

Inflammation of the Achilles tendon is called Achilles Tendonitis. Depending on the location of the inflammation, middle or lower part of the tendon, it is classified as noninsertional or insertional Achilles tendonitis; the “insertional” part describes whether or not it’s affected at the part that inserts into the heel bone). Noninsertional Achilles tendonitis tends to occur in younger active people, while Insertional Achilles tendonitis can occur to non-active people as well, and is often accompanied by a bony spur.

Symptoms include:

  • Tenderness and/or stiffness of the Achilles tendon, especially when you wake up.
  • Thickened portions of the tendon (a bump), where tissues may be tearing.
  • Swelling or pain that gets worse with activity or after activity.
  • Pain the day after exercising.
  • Bone spur where the Achilles tendon meets the heel bone.

Causes of Achilles Tendonitis:

  • Not warming up before vigorous exercises, such as sprints or hill climbs.
  • Sudden changes in the intensity of exercise.
  • Wearing the wrong footwear, such as worn down or unsupportive shoes, while exercising.
  • Constantly running on hard pavement (increasing impact on the Achilles tendon) or uneven surfaces (straining the tendon and forcing it to flex more normal).
  • Flat feet, over-pronation, and/or fallen arches can put more strain on the Achilles tendon as it stretches and flexes at an angle.
  • Bone spurs can rub against the tendon, causing tears and inflammation.

Risk Factors:

  • It’s more likely to affect men than women.
  • The Achilles tendon weakens with age, so you’re more likely to experience it as you get older.
  • Those with flat feet or fallen arches are more likely to be affected.
  • Those with psoriasis or high blood pressure are at higher risk.
  • Side effects of certain medications, such as fluoroquinolone, include increased the risk of being affected by Achilles tendonitis, even after they stop the medication.

If you think you or your family member is being affected by pain from Achilles tendonitis, make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet and give them the treatment or orthotic support they need. Come see him at our Clark, NJ office.

By Clark Podiatry Center
September 28, 2016
Category: proper foot care
Tags: Footwear   Fall sports  

For kids and adults alike, autumn weather signals another opportunity to engage in sports. The daytime provides the warmth for outdoor time, and in the evening, the cooler weather prevents folks from overheating as they train. Footwear choices are changing from flip-flops and sandals to walking shoes, flats, and boots. With all the changes (including the colors of the leaves), it gives an opportunity to get new shoes!

Children and Fall Sports

At this time of year, school or town leagues are in full swing. Soccer, football, cross-country, and tennis are in competition mode and children are trying to rack up points for their team. This is a good time to inspect equipment and especially footwear to make sure that your children are protected from possibly injury.

Footwear - Each sport usually has a specific type of footwear suited for the movements of the sport. Soccer and football usually require cleats to allow for traction on grassy fields. For those who are prone to ankle injury, there are some cleats with high tops to support the ankle. Cross-country and tennis will require supportive, cushiony sneakers for caring for the feet and ankles during impact and lateral movements. The wrong shoes can leave your child at higher risk for injury or even with an accident that takes them out of the sport for the season.

Equipment – Some sports have protective equipment as part of their uniforms. Football players have shoulder pads and helmets and some other sports have shin guards for impact situations. Inspect equipment to make sure that they are in shape to protect against those impacts that could lead to broken or fractured bones.

Adults and Fall Sports

There are also many adult leagues outside of the professional groups like the NFL and MLS. For recreational sports, adults should also make sure that you have protective gear and footwear. In addition to the common fall sports, hiking and marathons are also popular fall activities. As adults, we are not less at risk for injury, so make sure to wear any protective gear. We at Clark Podiatry Center want to encourage you to train with supportive and properly cushioned sneakers for running. Hikers should use boots that are “broken-in” before the first hike and make sure to stretch and warm up feet, ankles, and legs.

For those who have injuries or foot/ankle issue, but want to participate in fall sports, we recommend that you make an appointment to see Dr. Brandon Macy before you engage in anything that might worsen your problems. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Macy, serves the Clark, NJ area, as well as the town of Westfield and surrounding Union County to keep you walking.



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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470