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Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: Flat Feet

By Clark Podiatry Center
August 22, 2018
Category: Foot Pain
Tags: Bunions   Flat Feet   Hammertoes   Neuroma   Shoes   injury   orthotic   dancing  

A neuroma is a condition in which the tissue around a nerve becomes thickened.

You might have a neuroma in your foot if you:

  • feel like you want to remove a small stone that you keep stepping on, but when you take your shoes off, it’s never there.
  • feel like you have a pinched nerve in the ball of your foot.
  • have burning pain, numbness, or tingling between the third and fourth toes.

A neuroma in your foot is called Morton’s Neuroma and it’s usually caused by inflammation, irritation or injury. Repetitive motions with high pressure on the balls of the feet can cause chronic inflammation on the soft tissues near the nerve. This can include wearing shoes with high heels and/or narrow toe boxes for long periods of time. Participating in activities like dancing or sports that involve running, sprinting, or jumping are also likely culprits. Additionally, if you injure the foot by dropping something on it or stepping hard on a pointed object, it can cause a prolonged inflammation in that nerve.

Some foot deformities can also put you at higher risk of developing symptoms of Morton’s Neuroma. Hammertoes, bunions, flat feet, or very high arches can all shift your body weight so that the ball of the foot has to unevenly bear more weight. 

Once symptoms set in, it’s important to rest the foot and reduce inflammation and pain to prevent worsening and ongoing symptoms. Using orthotic inserts, applying ice, massaging the foot, and/or anti-inflammatory drugs may help you feel better. You may also consider how your shoes might be affecting the way your feet feel on a day-to-day basis. If they are too tight, your toes might need more room to relax throughout the day. If you don’t have enough arch support or cushioning, the balls of your feet might have to strain more.

If conservative at-home treatments and adjusting your shoes do not help, our podiatrist might use cortisone injections or sclerosing alcohol injections to relieve pain. At worst case scenario, the nerve may need to be surgically removed.

Don’t suffer from Morton’s Neuroma! We can help you feel better! Make an appointment today at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your feet to find the best treatments or solutions for your feet. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!

As your child continues to grow taller and stronger, they may experience what we commonly call “growing pains”. But did you know that there is no evidence that growth causes pain? So what’s going on when your child complains of aches and pains in the legs and is sometimes even woken up by it?

Well, it’s most likely the body’s way of telling your child that he or she has overused muscles throughout the day. As your child learns the limits of what the body can do, (s)he might play (run, jump, or climb) to the point of overexertion. The thighs, knees, or calves may feel stiff or sore and the pain may not go away until morning (with adequate rest).

But what if the pain continues to bother them? Or what if the pain is in the feet or ankles? These symptoms may indicate more of a problem.

Ongoing or chronic pain can indicate that there are misalignment issues in the feet, ankles, or legs, causing repetitive strain on certain muscles, tendons, or ligaments. Children who are pigeon-toed or are in-toeing can experience ongoing pain in different parts of the feet, ankles, or calves.

If the pain is localized to a specific part of the foot or ankle, there’s a good chance that there is a foot problem, such as:

Actually, pain in the feet and ankles are never “growing pains”. So if your child complains of pain in the areas of the leg with muscles, they may find relief with some massage or a warm bath with Epsom salt. However, if the pain is in the joint itself, or the feet or ankles, make an appointment to see us at The New Jersey Children’s Foot Health Institute at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your child’s feet and ankles to find the best treatment. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!

Did you know that the Achilles tendon (strong fibrous tissue that attaches the calf muscle to the back of the heel bone) is the largest tendon in the body? Without proper functioning Achilles tendons, we wouldn’t be able to walk or run! And because it is so involved in our daily lives as well as in the movements that playing sports entails, it’s also one of the most likely tendons to be inflamed or injured/ruptured.

Inflammation of the Achilles tendon is called Achilles Tendonitis. Depending on the location of the inflammation, middle or lower part of the tendon, it is classified as noninsertional or insertional Achilles tendonitis; the “insertional” part describes whether or not it’s affected at the part that inserts into the heel bone). Noninsertional Achilles tendonitis tends to occur in younger active people, while Insertional Achilles tendonitis can occur to non-active people as well, and is often accompanied by a bony spur.

Symptoms include:

  • Tenderness and/or stiffness of the Achilles tendon, especially when you wake up.
  • Thickened portions of the tendon (a bump), where tissues may be tearing.
  • Swelling or pain that gets worse with activity or after activity.
  • Pain the day after exercising.
  • Bone spur where the Achilles tendon meets the heel bone.

Causes of Achilles Tendonitis:

  • Not warming up before vigorous exercises, such as sprints or hill climbs.
  • Sudden changes in the intensity of exercise.
  • Wearing the wrong footwear, such as worn down or unsupportive shoes, while exercising.
  • Constantly running on hard pavement (increasing impact on the Achilles tendon) or uneven surfaces (straining the tendon and forcing it to flex more normal).
  • Flat feet, over-pronation, and/or fallen arches can put more strain on the Achilles tendon as it stretches and flexes at an angle.
  • Bone spurs can rub against the tendon, causing tears and inflammation.

Risk Factors:

  • It’s more likely to affect men than women.
  • The Achilles tendon weakens with age, so you’re more likely to experience it as you get older.
  • Those with flat feet or fallen arches are more likely to be affected.
  • Those with psoriasis or high blood pressure are at higher risk.
  • Side effects of certain medications, such as fluoroquinolone, include increased the risk of being affected by Achilles tendonitis, even after they stop the medication.

If you think you or your family member is being affected by pain from Achilles tendonitis, make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet and give them the treatment or orthotic support they need. Come see him at our Clark, NJ office.

By Clark Podiatry Center
January 10, 2018

As children’s bodies continue to grow, they may also develop issues that cause them pain. However, keep in mind that growing pains are not normal when it comes to feet. Any foot or ankle issues that they may experience indicate a foot problem that must be addressed to prevent further complications.

For the most part, children may grow out of certain conditions such as bow legs, flat feet, and in-toeing. Still, it’s important to come see our podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy, at The New Jersey Children’s Foot Health Institute as soon as they complain or seem to show signs of foot pain. Treating a problem early and using prevention methods are easier than trying to solve problems later, as they can become more complex and even require more invasive treatments, such as surgery.

A commonly prescribed treatment for children with foot problems is custom orthotics. They come in all shapes and sizes, and for mild symptoms, even over-the-counter inserts can be helpful. Dr. Macy can help you determine the best type of orthotics for your child’s needs.

In general, orthotics can be useful to relieve symptoms associated with:

  • Flat Feet: When the arches in the feet do not develop after learning to walk, children can experience pain along the bottom of the feet as the tendons and muscles around the arches strain to support the feet. Some children can “grow out of it” and develop arches later, but they should get supportive orthotics to relieve pain.
  • Overpronation: Often associated with flat feet, this is a condition in which the ankle bones tend to lean inward. This can cause strain on the ankle joints and heels as they grow out of alignment. Orthotics can help to support the feet and prevent the ankles from rolling inward.
  • Sever’s Disease (heel pain): This disease affects the growth plate at the base of the heel bone. It can be caused by repetitive stress or injury to the bottom of the foot, and is usually more common in active children. Orthotics can help displace the pressure placed on the growth plate to reduce inflammation and irritation.
  • Osgood Schlatters (knee pain): A painful bump below the kneecap can indicate inflammation to the knee, especially in children who run and jump and are experiencing growth spurts. Orthotics can be used to reduce the impact on the knees and relieve pain.

Is your child overpronating or complaining of foot or ankle pain? It’s important that their needs are addressed to prevent complications as they grow. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy can assess your children’s feet and give them the treatment or orthotic support they need. Come see him at Clark Podiatry Center. Make an appointment to see us today at our Clark, NJ office.

By Clark Podiatry Center
June 02, 2017

Our children’s health is always of top concern. With the myriad of information out there about things that can go wrong, it can be hard for parents to determine when something is actually a problem for our growing children. The older they get, their bodies go through many changes, and sometimes it can be difficult to decipher what’s normal and what isn’t.

At least with regards to their feet, we at the New Jersey Foot Health Institute of Clark Podiatry Center have some tips as to when you should pay close attention to possible children’s foot problems. Look out for the following symptoms or issues:

  • Pain, swelling, redness, and/or heat that does not subside after using the RICE method (rest, ice, compression, elevation). Remember that growing pains or NOT normal in the feet.
  • Blisters, corns, or calluses on one part of the feet.
  • Chronic ingrown toenails.
  • Walking issues – Look for problems in the gait, such as in-toeing, out-toeing, or toe walking. Look for shape the shape of legs when they stand or walk, focusing on whether or not the legs are bowed out or caving inward.
  • Deformities in the way their feet look – e.g. clubfoot, curly toes, hammertoes, flat feet.
  • Ankles that seem to easily roll or twist often.

Inspect your regularly for changes in the skin of the feet as well, especially after your child has been playing barefoot or in socks. Check for cuts, bruises, color change, rashes, or odor, and treat accordingly. Children are also prone to fungal or viral infections, so foot hygiene is very important. Many older children may ignore foot pain or try to shake it off, so it’s best to be vigilant about any changes in walking or behavior.

If you suspect that your child might have a foot problem, or if your child is complaining of foot pain, make an appointment today at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your children’s feet to find the best treatments or solutions for their developing feet. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!



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Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470