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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: Flat Feet

By Clark Podiatry Center
March 27, 2019

There is no better time to begin taking care of our feet than when we are a child. From the very beginning it is crucial our children maintain good foot health and knowing which problems are most likely to occur early on can help greatly. So, what are some of the more prevalent issues with our children’s feet? Good question.

As an infant, it is very important for children to be able to move and stretch their feet as their bones are growing. Undue pressure can damage this and can lead to much more serious problems later on. Also make sure that socks and shoes are not too tight. Don’t rush a child into walking. He or she will develop on their own according to their individual needs, but do keep an eye on their gait so if some type of intervention is needed, it can be addressed immediately.

It is not uncommon for children to inherit many of the same problems their parents have. These include:

  • Flat feet - Poor arch support can often be passed on to a child but can also be treated.
  • Heel problems – problems with the Achilles tendon can cause discomfort.
  • Pigeon toes – walking with your feet and toes pointed inward.
  • Knock knees – knees that touch each other as you walk can and often is treated with braces.
  • Bowlegs - a curvature of the legs which can be indicative of other more complex issues like Rickets caused by a lack of vitamin D and Blount’s disease or abnormal growth on the top of the tibia.

Indications your children may have foot issues can include:

  • Tired legs – this may indicate flat feet.
  • Difficulty in sports – not being able to compete may indicate issues with their feet and gait.
  • Tripping and falling – the inability to keep their balance.
  • Foot shyness – when a child doesn’t want anyone to see their feet for the fear of embarrassment.
  • Pain - pain is never a good sign and can indicate poor fitting shoes, bad bone development or other more serious conditions.

Early recognition is very important for our children’s foot health. If you believe your child may suffer from any of the above conditions or if you have any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
March 05, 2019
Category: Heel pain
Tags: x-ray   Flat Feet   Plantar Fasciitis   Orthotics   Shoes   stretch   MRI  

The foot is one of the most complicated parts of the human body. With 19 separate muscles, 26 bones, 33 joints, and at least 107 ligaments and tendons, it is easy to see why taking care of your feet is very important. One of the common ailments many people experience is called Plantar fasciitis, a painful inflammation of connective tissue that runs across the bottom of the foot connecting the heel bone to the rest of the foot.  Plantar Fasciitis is commonly experienced by people whose feet constantly pound hard, flat surfaces and are often caused by Heel Spurs or bony protrusions of calcium on the heel.

Risk Factors for Plantar Fasciitis

  • Age - Between the ages of 40 and 60.
  • Diabetes
  • Exercise -  Activities that put a lot of stress on your heel - long-distance running, jumping activities, basketball, ballet, and aerobic dance.
  • Foot mechanics - Having flat feet, a high arch or an abnormal pattern of walking that distributes weight unevenly on the foot.
  • Obesity - Being overweight.
  • Occupation - Factory workers, teachers, construction workers, athletes, nurses and others who walk or stand a lot on hard surfaces.

Some of the ways to avoid Plantar Fasciitis

  • Lose weight.
  • Always wear appropriate athletic shoes.
  • Wear shoes that are supportive, have good arch support and absorb shock well.
  • Stretch and warm up before exercising.
  • See your doctor if you suspect you have Plantar Fasciitis.

If you do see your doctor, there are several ways to treat the ailment depending on the severity of the inflammation. They include:

  • Examination- Physical examination of the inflamed site.
  • X-Ray or MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) to see if there is a damaged nerve or fracture.
  • Ultrasound
  • Medicine - Doctor prescribed mostly over the counter pain meds.
  • Stretching - ligaments, tendons, and muscles before exercise especially.  
  • Therapy -  Physical Therapy, Night Splints and the use of Orthotics.
  • Surgery - At times this may be necessary if other methods are not successful.

If you have any questions or would like to see a podiatrist, please make an appointment with our friendly staff. Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470. If you have concerns with your children’s feet, Dr. Macy specializes in pediatrics and can assess your children’s feet at New Jersey Children’s Foot Health Institute.

By Clark Podiatry Center
August 22, 2018
Category: Foot Pain
Tags: Bunions   Flat Feet   Hammertoes   Neuroma   Shoes   injury   orthotic   dancing  

A neuroma is a condition in which the tissue around a nerve becomes thickened.

You might have a neuroma in your foot if you:

  • feel like you want to remove a small stone that you keep stepping on, but when you take your shoes off, it’s never there.
  • feel like you have a pinched nerve in the ball of your foot.
  • have burning pain, numbness, or tingling between the third and fourth toes.

A neuroma in your foot is called Morton’s Neuroma and it’s usually caused by inflammation, irritation or injury. Repetitive motions with high pressure on the balls of the feet can cause chronic inflammation on the soft tissues near the nerve. This can include wearing shoes with high heels and/or narrow toe boxes for long periods of time. Participating in activities like dancing or sports that involve running, sprinting, or jumping are also likely culprits. Additionally, if you injure the foot by dropping something on it or stepping hard on a pointed object, it can cause a prolonged inflammation in that nerve.

Some foot deformities can also put you at higher risk of developing symptoms of Morton’s Neuroma. Hammertoes, bunions, flat feet, or very high arches can all shift your body weight so that the ball of the foot has to unevenly bear more weight. 

Once symptoms set in, it’s important to rest the foot and reduce inflammation and pain to prevent worsening and ongoing symptoms. Using orthotic inserts, applying ice, massaging the foot, and/or anti-inflammatory drugs may help you feel better. You may also consider how your shoes might be affecting the way your feet feel on a day-to-day basis. If they are too tight, your toes might need more room to relax throughout the day. If you don’t have enough arch support or cushioning, the balls of your feet might have to strain more.

If conservative at-home treatments and adjusting your shoes do not help, our podiatrist might use cortisone injections or sclerosing alcohol injections to relieve pain. At worst case scenario, the nerve may need to be surgically removed.

Don’t suffer from Morton’s Neuroma! We can help you feel better! Make an appointment today at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your feet to find the best treatments or solutions for your feet. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!

As your child continues to grow taller and stronger, they may experience what we commonly call “growing pains”. But did you know that there is no evidence that growth causes pain? So what’s going on when your child complains of aches and pains in the legs and is sometimes even woken up by it?

Well, it’s most likely the body’s way of telling your child that he or she has overused muscles throughout the day. As your child learns the limits of what the body can do, (s)he might play (run, jump, or climb) to the point of overexertion. The thighs, knees, or calves may feel stiff or sore and the pain may not go away until morning (with adequate rest).

But what if the pain continues to bother them? Or what if the pain is in the feet or ankles? These symptoms may indicate more of a problem.

Ongoing or chronic pain can indicate that there are misalignment issues in the feet, ankles, or legs, causing repetitive strain on certain muscles, tendons, or ligaments. Children who are pigeon-toed or are in-toeing can experience ongoing pain in different parts of the feet, ankles, or calves.

If the pain is localized to a specific part of the foot or ankle, there’s a good chance that there is a foot problem, such as:

Actually, pain in the feet and ankles are never “growing pains”. So if your child complains of pain in the areas of the leg with muscles, they may find relief with some massage or a warm bath with Epsom salt. However, if the pain is in the joint itself, or the feet or ankles, make an appointment to see us at The New Jersey Children’s Foot Health Institute at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your child’s feet and ankles to find the best treatment. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!

Did you know that the Achilles tendon (strong fibrous tissue that attaches the calf muscle to the back of the heel bone) is the largest tendon in the body? Without proper functioning Achilles tendons, we wouldn’t be able to walk or run! And because it is so involved in our daily lives as well as in the movements that playing sports entails, it’s also one of the most likely tendons to be inflamed or injured/ruptured.

Inflammation of the Achilles tendon is called Achilles Tendonitis. Depending on the location of the inflammation, middle or lower part of the tendon, it is classified as noninsertional or insertional Achilles tendonitis; the “insertional” part describes whether or not it’s affected at the part that inserts into the heel bone). Noninsertional Achilles tendonitis tends to occur in younger active people, while Insertional Achilles tendonitis can occur to non-active people as well, and is often accompanied by a bony spur.

Symptoms include:

  • Tenderness and/or stiffness of the Achilles tendon, especially when you wake up.
  • Thickened portions of the tendon (a bump), where tissues may be tearing.
  • Swelling or pain that gets worse with activity or after activity.
  • Pain the day after exercising.
  • Bone spur where the Achilles tendon meets the heel bone.

Causes of Achilles Tendonitis:

  • Not warming up before vigorous exercises, such as sprints or hill climbs.
  • Sudden changes in the intensity of exercise.
  • Wearing the wrong footwear, such as worn down or unsupportive shoes, while exercising.
  • Constantly running on hard pavement (increasing impact on the Achilles tendon) or uneven surfaces (straining the tendon and forcing it to flex more normal).
  • Flat feet, over-pronation, and/or fallen arches can put more strain on the Achilles tendon as it stretches and flexes at an angle.
  • Bone spurs can rub against the tendon, causing tears and inflammation.

Risk Factors:

  • It’s more likely to affect men than women.
  • The Achilles tendon weakens with age, so you’re more likely to experience it as you get older.
  • Those with flat feet or fallen arches are more likely to be affected.
  • Those with psoriasis or high blood pressure are at higher risk.
  • Side effects of certain medications, such as fluoroquinolone, include increased the risk of being affected by Achilles tendonitis, even after they stop the medication.

If you think you or your family member is being affected by pain from Achilles tendonitis, make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet and give them the treatment or orthotic support they need. Come see him at our Clark, NJ office.



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Call Today 732-382-3470

1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470