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Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for tag: Bunions

By Clark Podiatry Center
June 05, 2019
Tags: blisters   fungus   ingrown toenails   Bunions   Hammertoes   stretch   callus   corn   podiatrist   ballet   black nails  

Dancing is one of man’s oldest activities. Either as a celebration or entertainment, dance has been around for many years. Some historical records show dance as an active part of a human culture dating as far back as 3300 B.C. in India and Egypt. Just where and when it began is unknown, but it would not be unusual to imagine ancient man celebrating a successful hunt with a ‘dance’ around the communal campfire millions of years ago.

One type of modern dance that is still popular today is ballet. Ballet dancing includes, music, costumes and stage scenery and is usually done on the dancer’s toes. Because of this, ballet dancing can take a heavy toll on a dancer’s feet.

Some of the foot problems ballet dancers experience include:

  • Blisters – a sore on your foot filled liquid. Some can be popped while others should be left to heal on their own
  • Bunions – a deformity at the base of the big toe
  • Hammertoes – where the toe is buckled up at a joint
  • Callus – the development of a thick and hard layer of skin often over the ball of the foot, heel or outer edge of the big toe
  • Corn – smaller thickening layer of skin with a soft core
  • Black nails – bruising or bleeding under the nail
  • Ingrown toenails – where the sides of the nail grow into the nail groove

Basic Footcare for Ballet:

  • Alternate shoes – changing the shoes you perform in will allow them to dry and help prevent the growth of foot disease causing fungus
  • Moisturize your feet
  • Wear padding to help support your toes
  • Proper fitting ballet shoes – see a ballet store to determine if your ballet shoes fit properly
  • Stretch your feet when not dancing
  • See your podiatrist – regular visits to your podiatrist will help maintain foot health especially with all the stress and potential for foot problems that can come with ballet

Like any sport or activity, ballet requires dedication and hard work. Keeping in shape is very important to be your best when it comes to ballet. This applies especially to your feet.

If you or your children are considering ballet or have any foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
May 29, 2019
Category: Foot Pain

There are many things that can cause pain in your feet. One is called a Neuroma. A Neuroma is the thickening of the skin and irritation of a nerve between your toes. Neuromas can affect the ball of your feet and is usually found between your 3rd and 4th toes. This is also called Morton’s Neuroma.

Symptoms of a Neuroma include:

  • Feeling like you have a pebble in your footwear
  • Sharp, burning pain in your feet especially between your toes
  • Toes may feel numb

Risk factors for a Neuroma include:

  • High heel footwear – can put undue pressure on your toes and ball of your feet
  • High impact sports – jogging, running, basketball and/or gymnastics
  • Inherited or other foot issues – bunions, hammertoes, flat feet or high arches

Home treatments can include:

  • Ice – 15 minutes on and off for several hours to reduce pain
  • Anti-inflammatory meds – Tylenol. Make sure you take them only as directed.
  • Better fitting footwear – that do not put undue pressure on your toes or ball of the foot
  • Reducing or stopping the aggravating activity – take a break from running or basketball for awhile

It is very important to see you podiatrist if you think you are developing a Neuroma. Your podiatrist can treat the condition in the following ways:

  • Use specifically designed orthotic – your podiatrist can recommend which one is best for you
  • Inject steroids to alleviate the pain
  • Surgery – a cutting and thereby loosening of the ligament around the affected area
  • Surgery – the removal of the affected nerve. This can, however, result in permanent numbness
  • Injections of something called sclerosing alcohol. This treatment has seen some positive results, but not in all cases. Your podiatrist is the best person to decide.   

Do you suspect you have a Neuroma or have any other foot concerns,  schedule an appointment with Clark Podiatry Center  at 732-382-3470 to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon A. Macy who is  associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute . Come see us at our Clark, New Jersey office today!

By Clark Podiatry Center
May 08, 2019
Category: Foot Pain

When it comes to having healthy feet, besides regularly seeing your podiatrist, you may want to take a few minutes to give them a good massage. This would be especially rewarding after a long day at work or athletic activity. You don’t have to be a professional masseuse to make your feet feel better. This you can do on your own and in your home.

You can break foot massages down into two categories:

  • Wet Massage – massaging your feet after you’ve soaked your feet in a combination of warm water and Epsom salt for about 20 minutes.
  • Dry Massage – Massaging your feet without soaking in warm water.

While you can massage your feet without a good soak, soaking will loosen up the muscles and help alleviate any pain you may be suffering. Make sure you dry your feet well before massaging though.

How to Give a good foot massage:

  • Start by rubbing the soles of your feet.
  • Focus on anything that feels tight or feels good when you rub.
  • Rub from your heel to the ball of the foot.
  • Stretch out your toes and ankles but wiggling them back and forth.
  • Rub the tops, sides and bottom of your toes to get the blood flowing.
  • Squeeze your heel and top side of your foot. Work to loosen the muscle and improve blood flow.
  • Also remember to rub the muscles in your arch.  
  • Focus on the bones of the foot by rubbing between them with a firm circular motion.
  • Repeat the above for any areas that felt especially good.

This is also a good time for a ‘foot checkup’ checking for corns, calluses, bunions, areas of soreness, trimming of nails or other concerns etc.  When finished, feel free to rub in skin lotion or powdered corn silk.

If you have foot concerns or just want to ask questions about your feet, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

Now that we are in full swing of winter, it’s time to talk about all the fun you and your children will have during the cold winter months! Most winter activities, related to snow and ice can be a lot of fun but come with their share of possible foot and ankle injuries too.

The most common injuries that children and adults encounter while having winter fun include:

  • Stress fractures or broken bones: These are common from slips and falls on the slippery ice and snow.
  • Overuse injuries: Plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendonitis are common overuse injuries from straining the feet and ankles. If they seem to affect you often, we can help you with custom orthotics.
  • Ankle sprain: These injuries are also common from slips and falls, or twists of the ankles.
  • Blisters: Certain types of shoes or ill-fitting shoes can often cause blisters with winter activities.

Many of these injuries have to do with wearing the right shoes for the activity and making sure they fit well. Prevent winter fun foot injuries by checking your winter footwear habits:

  • Ski/snowboard boots and snowshoes – These are specific to the activity and need to fit properly to enjoy the activity without injury. Footwear that is too big or loose can cause you to lose control, as well as require a lot of strain and effort from your feet. Footwear that is too small or tight can leave you with cramped toes and blisters.
  • Ice skates – To glide effortlessly across the ice, you’ll need to have skates that fit well. Most skates tend to be pointy in the front, so be sure that your feet are not too cramped when trying them on. Otherwise, you can aggravate bunions, neuromas, and other toe issues like hammertoes. If you tend to blister in the same areas, use padding or a bandage to prevent excessive chafing of the skin.
  • Hiking boots – If you like taking winter hikes, be sure to have boots with thick tread to help you grip the snowy trails. Check out our tips on choosing your children’s hiking shoes.
  • Winter boots (in general) – If your children’s favorite activity in the winter is to go sledding, snow tubing, or snowball fights, there aren’t special shoes for those activities. You’ll still want to use winter boots, which we talked about here.
  • Socks - Okay, so these are not shoes, but are important to think about. Try on all winter shoes and boots with socks to make sure that thick socks can be accommodated comfortably.

More tips for preventing injuries during winter activities:

  • Start slowly, stretch, and warm up.
  • Prevent Frostbite. Children and adults should make sure that snow and ice do not get into the shoes. When socks and shoes are wet on the inside, the feet can be at risk for frostbite in cold temperatures. If socks get wet during winter fun activities, change them so that feet are not exposed to the cold for a long period.
  • Supervise children when they are participating in outdoor winter activities like sledding and snow tubing. If they are too rowdy, it can cause collisions with other children and injuries to many other parts of the body, including the head.

Have you or your child suffered an injury while trying to have some winter fun? Come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet, and find the best treatment for any winter foot injuries. Make an appointment at our Clark, NJ office so we can keep you walking.

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
December 26, 2018
Category: Foot Health Tips
Tags: Bunions   Orthotics   Athlete's Foot   fungal   toe exercises   wart   corn  

The holidays are coming to a close, and now it’s time to ring in the New Year! Whether you’re staying home with family or celebrating with friends at a party, remember to stay safe and keep your feet comfortable. After all, they’ve worked hard for you all year in 2018!

So how will you keep them healthy and in tip-top shape in the New Year? Here are some ways you can help your feet to be healthier and stronger so that they can keep you walking:

  • Daily foot hygiene is key to keeping your feet free from bacterial or fungal infection. Don’t start your year off with Athlete’s foot! Use flip flops in communal showers and wash your feet daily with soap and warm water! Why wait for infection symptoms when you can prevent them?
  • Incorporate foot exercises into your regular physical activity. Remember, we recommend moderate to vigorous activity, at least 3 times a week. Try doing exercises like calf stretches, heel-ups (tip toes), and toe exercises like curls with a small gym towel. You can even do some while sitting at your office desk, like foot circles, as well as pointing and flexing them.
  • Step it up! Got a new phone, smartwatch, or other activity trackers as a holiday gift? Put it to good use! Start tracking the number of steps you’re getting each day. It’s a great motivator to keep active instead of leading a sedentary lifestyle. You might be surprised just how much or how little steps you get in per day!
  • Start wearing the right shoes. We’re not necessarily saying that you are wearing the wrong shoes, but rather that there are shoes that may better suit your feet. Since they are working hard for us every day, why not get comfortable and supportive shoes for our feet? If you need orthotics, get them! That way they won’t be tired or sore at the end of a long day.
  • Stop ignoring your foot problems and finally get around to treating them. Had a pesky wart that doesn’t hurt but won’t go away? How about a new corn that’s been developing? Many women develop mild bunions and when left untreated, can become very large and disfigured. In the New Year, we urge you to come to see your podiatrist so that he can help you get the foot care that you need. Why wait for it to become a bigger problem?
  • Hydrate and Eat well. Most people want to start the year healthy. Eating a nutritious diet and remembering to stay hydrated is a great start. Not only will your whole body benefit, but you’ll also be reducing the risk of potential foot problems as well. Additionally, if you do have some foot problems, foods full of nutrients can help them heal more quickly.

Maybe you’ll incorporate these into your New Year’s Resolutions. It is, indeed the time to make important new healthy habits and break bad unhealthy ones.

Need some more help and encouragement for healthier feet in the New Year? Schedule your annual podiatry checkup by making an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet to ensure that there are no issues and recommend some great ways to keep you walking. Come see us at our Clark, NJ office today!

 

 



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Call Today 732-382-3470

1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470