732-382-3470
 

Find Us

Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Archive:

Tags

Categories:

Have a question? Find answers and other helpful topics in our digital library.

 

   

  

Posts for tag: Achilles tendon

By Clark Podiatry Center
July 24, 2019
Category: flat feet

Having flat feet can be a problem. What is a flat foot? A flat foot is a foot without an arch. For a child, though, it is not uncommon. Flat feet also are known as Pes planus, is seen in 44% of 3 to 6-year-old children. By age 9, though, the arch usually develops, and the condition clears itself. For some, though, this doesn’t occur.

Problems associated with flat feet include:

  • Poor walking gait – feet may roll to the inside causing them to point outward
  • Joint pain – ankles, hips, and knees
  • Exhausted muscles – overuse due to compensating muscles
  • Toe walking – walking on the balls of your feet
  • Unnatural development of the foot  

Basic causes for flat feet include:

  • Low muscle tone – the muscle is too soft or stretchy and doesn’t allow for support
  • High muscle tone – causes a tight or short Achilles tendon which pulls the on foot

Medical conditions which can contribute to a flat foot include cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, juvenile arthritis, and some conditions which affect nerves, which is why it is very important to see your podiatrist. They will be able to assess your condition and determine just why this is occurring.

While having flat feet can be a problem, treatment for a child is not necessary as we said will likely develop over time. If it doesn’t, and your child feels pain, it is important to see your podiatrist. For adults, there are several ways to treat flat feet, which includes:

  • A custom orthotic – gradual addition of layers to build the arch
  • Stretching – focusing on the calf muscle and tendons

Surgery can also be used as treatment. One is called reconstructive surgery, and the other is the implantation of subtalar support for the arch.

If you believe you have flat feet or are concerned about your child’s flat foot or have any other concerns about your feet, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
April 09, 2019

It probably won’t be a surprise to you that much of a child’s foot health is inherited. High or no arches, tendencies to walk bow legged or the development of calluses are just some of what a child can expect if their parents suffered from the same. One common malady, however, is something called Severs Disease. Also known as Calcaneal apophysitis, Severs Disease is the inflammation of the growth plate in the heel of growing and active children. Severs disease causes pain and a slight swelling around the heel making it difficult to walk or run.

Treating Severs disease includes the following:

  • Reduce activities – Have your child immediately refrain from any activity that causes heel pain.
  • Ice – apply ice to the heel for 20 minutes 3 times a day.
  • Orthotics – children with high arches, no arch, or bowlegs an orthotic may be needed to alleviate the stress on the heel. See your podiatrist for this.
  • Short leg casts – in more dramatic cases children may need to have a short leg cast to temporarily rest the Achilles heel.
  • Shoes – wearing more elevated and cushioning shoes.
  • Stretching – stretching the Achilles tendon can loosen the affected area.
  • Pain meds – using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain medications like ibuprofen and naproxen can help. Male sure to only use as directed and see your podiatrist if you have any questions.

As long as the treatment works, your child can go back to their active self. It is not uncommon, though, for the malady to return unless long term care such as the above is taken. Some of the sports which would be prone to this are running, basketball, tennis and gymnastics, but any activity that requires pounding their feet on a hard surface can induce Severs.

If you or your child has heel pain or any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
March 12, 2019
Category: Athletic Foot Care

If you’re an athlete, you know from experience that your feet are very important to your performance. Agility and coordination are crucial and making sure your feet continue delivering their best depends on how you treat them. Different activities place different stress on your feet.  Martial arts require quick repetitive movements that strike hard trauma inducing objects, whereas aerobic exercises like gymnastics demand strong cushioning and balance. Team orientated sports like football, baseball, and basketball can strain ankles and knees making stretching very important.

Some of the most common problems athletes experience include:

  • Ankle sprains. With most of a person’s weight placed on each leg, the ankle suffers if it isn’t supported and strengthened.
  • Heel issues. Constant pounding on hard surfaces can cause problems with an athlete’s heel making walking or running very difficult and painful.
  • Stress fractures. Insufficient cushioning can steadily lead to small fissures in a person’s bones.
  • Achilles tendon. The irritation and possible separating of the main tendon at the back of the foot. This is very painful and can end an athletic career.
  • Morton’s neuroma. A hardening of the skin at the ball of an athlete’s foot.

All the above problems can be treated with a little care and attention. First, making sure your feet are well rested and stretched before any performance is important. Stretching will include not just your feet, but other parts of your body as well. Slowly increasing your range of motion is your goal, as is strengthening muscles in and around your feet. Doing so will help absorb the shock and stress often associated with athletic competition keeping you ‘on your toes.’

It is not uncommon to see an athlete bob up and down as he or she pushes his muscles and tendons during a pregame stretch, however this can be very dangerous if they are not careful. Too much bouncing can pull a muscle, just the opposite of what you want. A slow, steady, yet tolerable stretch is best as it extends the muscle but does not strain it.

Stretching is a good habit to get into whether you’re an athlete or not. Doing so when you wake in the morning will get your blood flowing and allow you to start the day more physically and mentally prepared.

If you have any questions about these posts or would like to see the doctor, please make an appointment with us.  Our podiatrist, Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children’s Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.  

By Clark Podiatry Center
June 26, 2018
Category: Shoes

You don’t have to be an older adult to have foot, ankle, knee, or hip problems from your job that requires you to stand all day. Those who work in healthcare, food service, or retail know all too well, how worn out the feet and legs can become at the end of a long shift. In order to survive the day-to-day, make sure you have the right footwear to support your feet and prevent pain all the way up to your back.

Here’s a checklist of features you want to look for in shoes to wear for standing all day:

  • Do they fit well? If shoes are too large or small, they can cause problems for your feet, either by causing instability or by cramping the toes. They should also have enough space in the toe box so that you can wiggle and stretch your toes a bit. Shoes that constrain the toes, like pointed-toe shoes, can cause cramping and chafing between the toes.
  • Is the outer sole non-slip, wide, and flat? The wider the surface area of the outer sole, the more stability in the shoes. You also want to make sure you have a non-slip grip on the outer soles so that you do not slip while walking.
  • Do you have good arch support? When standing, your ankles should not be rolling inward, especially if you have flat feet. Over time, pronating your ankles will cause pain to the Achilles tendon. Additionally, without arch support, plantar fascia can become strained and tight, causing inflammation (plantar fasciitis). 
  • Do you have enough cushioning? The inner sole should feel stable but have some cushion for comfort. If shoes do not have enough cushioning, use orthotic inserts to soften your surface.
  • Is the material protective? There are many who are at risk of workplace hazards. Dropping heavy objects, fumbling needles, or falling sharp knives all pose dangers to your feet. Depending on the type of work you do, be sure that you wear shoes made of a material that will protect your feet, even if it’s just for a short time.

Having the right shoes can make or break your mood after work. If you are tired and have pain from poor posture, you may not be in the mood to go meet friends or attend another of your kids’ sports practices. Far worse, it can eventually be what prevents or causes foot problems for you. If you have foot pain and have to stand all day, come in for a consultation with our podiatrist. Make an appointment to see us at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your feet to find the best treatment. We are located in Clark, NJ and are ready to serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns! 

By Clark Podiatry Center
May 02, 2018
Category: Foot Pain

Did you know that you have 2 small pea-sized bones near your big toe joint that are not connected to any other bones? Don’t worry; it’s not as weird as it sounds. They are not just floating around in your feet, but rather, connected to the tendons. Yes, every time you move your big toe up and down and take a step, your tendons are sliding along the sesamoids, kind of like a pulley.

So why are they to blame for foot pain?

In the same way that your Achilles tendon in your ankle can become irritated and inflamed, the tendon in your feet can also experience tendonitis, called sesamoiditis. Either the tendons are overused and become irritated as they repeatedly pass over the sesamoids, or they have endured an injury to the tendon or bones, causing inflammation.

Ballet dancers, sprinters, golfers, and baseball players commonly experience this injury because of the position their feet are often in. A lot of weight and pressure goes onto the big toe joint, making it more vulnerable to overuse injury.

If your foot pain looks like this:

  • Swelling and possibly bruising under the big toe joint,
  • Big toe joint pain when moving the big toe,
  • Inability to bear weight on the front of the foot, then you might be able to blame Sesamoiditis for your foot pain.

How can you get relief from Sesamoiditis?

  • RICE method (not just for children!)
  • NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), like ibuprofen and naproxen
  • Tape the foot or use a brace to keep the toe bent downward to reduce tension on the affected tendon
  • Steroid injection near the site of pain

Remember, since sesamoids are also bones, they could become fractured in an injury (or stress fractured due to overuse). If the pain is very severe and does not subside, get medical attention from our podiatrist ASAP.  Come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy for an assessment. Make an appointment today to have your sesamoids treated with care. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all of Union County! We keep you walking!



Questions or Comments?
We encourage you to contact us whenever you have an interest or concern about our services.

Call Today 732-382-3470

1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470