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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for: April, 2019

By Clark Podiatry Center
April 17, 2019
Category: bone health

With Spring here, physical activity will be on the rise especially for your children. With this comes the possibility of strains and injuries especially to a child’s feet. Much of this will depend on just how strong their bones are, a critical issue for foot health, but how do we ensure their bones are in the best shape?

One of the most important factors in good bone health is maintaining proper levels of Vitamin D which is created by the skin when exposed to the sun, one more reason to put down those smart phones and video game controllers and get outside.

Factors that Interfere with bone health include:

  • Testosterone or estrogen deficiency – Both help in the development of strong bones. A blood test can help determine this.
  • Proper nutrition – eating the right foods rich in Vitamin D and calcium.
  • Obesity – excessive weight will weaken and stress bones.
  • Genetics – tendencies passed on from parents or grandparents.
  • Continued exercise especially with women – this can stop the menstrual cycle and the production of much needed estrogen.
  • Some medications – see your podiatrist for this.

It is in childhood and adolescence where bones growth wider, longer and denser. Making sure your child has enough Vitamin D and calcium in their diet is very important. Maintaining good eating habits early on will also be of great help. Keeping foods rich with Vitamin D and calcium around the house will help. Most milk, infant formula and many cereals are fortified with Vitamin D while such foods as nuts, leafy greens and fish are rich in calcium, a mineral the body cannot produce but is crucial for bone growth. 

It is recommended that infants receive 400 IU or international units of Vitamin D each day and 600 IU for children and adolescents. Children with darker skin, are obese, have little exposure to sun or suffer from specific medical conditions are prone to Vitamin D deficiencies. Children low in Vitamin D and calcium may have decreased bone mass which can be determined by your podiatrist with an x-ray called a DXA scan.

If you are concerned about your child’s bone health or have any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.


By Clark Podiatry Center
April 09, 2019

It probably won’t be a surprise to you that much of a child’s foot health is inherited. High or no arches, tendencies to walk bow legged or the development of calluses are just some of what a child can expect if their parents suffered from the same. One common malady, however, is something called Severs Disease. Also known as Calcaneal apophysitis, Severs Disease is the inflammation of the growth plate in the heel of growing and active children. Severs disease causes pain and a slight swelling around the heel making it difficult to walk or run.

Treating Severs disease includes the following:

  • Reduce activities – Have your child immediately refrain from any activity that causes heel pain.
  • Ice – apply ice to the heel for 20 minutes 3 times a day.
  • Orthotics – children with high arches, no arch, or bowlegs an orthotic may be needed to alleviate the stress on the heel. See your podiatrist for this.
  • Short leg casts – in more dramatic cases children may need to have a short leg cast to temporarily rest the Achilles heel.
  • Shoes – wearing more elevated and cushioning shoes.
  • Stretching – stretching the Achilles tendon can loosen the affected area.
  • Pain meds – using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain medications like ibuprofen and naproxen can help. Male sure to only use as directed and see your podiatrist if you have any questions.

As long as the treatment works, your child can go back to their active self. It is not uncommon, though, for the malady to return unless long term care such as the above is taken. Some of the sports which would be prone to this are running, basketball, tennis and gymnastics, but any activity that requires pounding their feet on a hard surface can induce Severs.

If you or your child has heel pain or any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.


By Clark Podiatry Center
April 01, 2019

If you’ve just become a new parent, life has suddenly become full of wonderful surprises. Making sure your child grows up happy and healthy will be one of your priorities and keeping track of your child’s foot health is important. So, what can you expect?

Unlike an adult’s, a newborn’s feet will be much more padded and flexible allowing for the growth of bones and muscles. A baby’s feet are often blue, wrinkled and peeling having been inside the mother’s womb covered in amniotic fluid. Do not fret, though. They will naturally begin to pinken as they get warm.

Things to look for:

  • Proper Hip structure – making sure the hips are not dislocated.
  • Neurological response – the pediatrician will tickle the soles to see if the infant responds.
  • Clubfoot – abnormally small feet with toes pointed inward.
  • Metatarsus adductus or ‘C’ foot – a condition where the big toe points toward the other foot.
  • Extra toes – a common occurrence that is easily remedied with surgery.
  • Web feet – also a common occurrence remedied with surgery.

While all the above are possible, they are not automatic, so don’t be alarmed. Your podiatrist is specifically trained to assess and treat where needed.

While it is fine to look forward to seeing your child take their first step, don’t be too anxious. Each child will develop on their own and rushing them could set back their efforts.  Most children don’t start walking until they are 8 to 18 months old. Until then, it is important for them to be able to stretch their legs and move their toes. It is perfectly fine for toddlers to go barefoot as they refine their balance, posture, and coordination. Very important is the transfer of information from the soles of the child’s feet to their brain.

When it comes to shoes, a child’s feet should be professionally measured for length and width. It is not uncommon for shoe sizes to change every few months as feet will grow rapidly in the first few years. This is the beginning of a new chapter in your life. Enjoy it.

If you have any concerns with your child’s feet or their development or any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us.  Our podiatrist, Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.




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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470