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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for: March, 2019

By Clark Podiatry Center
March 27, 2019

There is no better time to begin taking care of our feet than when we are a child. From the very beginning it is crucial our children maintain good foot health and knowing which problems are most likely to occur early on can help greatly. So, what are some of the more prevalent issues with our children’s feet? Good question.

As an infant, it is very important for children to be able to move and stretch their feet as their bones are growing. Undue pressure can damage this and can lead to much more serious problems later on. Also make sure that socks and shoes are not too tight. Don’t rush a child into walking. He or she will develop on their own according to their individual needs, but do keep an eye on their gait so if some type of intervention is needed, it can be addressed immediately.

It is not uncommon for children to inherit many of the same problems their parents have. These include:

  • Flat feet - Poor arch support can often be passed on to a child but can also be treated.
  • Heel problems – problems with the Achilles tendon can cause discomfort.
  • Pigeon toes – walking with your feet and toes pointed inward.
  • Knock knees – knees that touch each other as you walk can and often is treated with braces.
  • Bowlegs - a curvature of the legs which can be indicative of other more complex issues like Rickets caused by a lack of vitamin D and Blount’s disease or abnormal growth on the top of the tibia.

Indications your children may have foot issues can include:

  • Tired legs – this may indicate flat feet.
  • Difficulty in sports – not being able to compete may indicate issues with their feet and gait.
  • Tripping and falling – the inability to keep their balance.
  • Foot shyness – when a child doesn’t want anyone to see their feet for the fear of embarrassment.
  • Pain - pain is never a good sign and can indicate poor fitting shoes, bad bone development or other more serious conditions.

Early recognition is very important for our children’s foot health. If you believe your child may suffer from any of the above conditions or if you have any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

 


By Clark Podiatry Center
March 20, 2019
Category: skin conditions

A Dry foot is a common ailment for many people. Besides looking unhealthy, having dry feet could lead to other more serious conditions, so keeping an eye on the health of your feet is important. Some of the causes of dry feet include:

  • Athlete’s foot – a skin disease caused by a fungus which usually occurs between the toes
  • Eczema - also called dermatitis. Most types cause dry, itchy skin and rashes on the feet
  • Psoriasis – inflammatory skin disease that causes flaking
  • Thyroid disease – over or underactive thyroid can cause an unhealthy thickening of the skin
  • Diabetes – (Associated with feet) loss of feeling due to high levels of sugar in the body

If you have dry feet, try soaking your feet in warm water for 10 to 20 minutes. This will loosen the skin and make it easier to remove. You can also soak pumice stone in warm water and gently rub the foot in a circular motion which will slowly take off the dry skin. Follow this up with a good skin oil or lotion which includes Coconut and olive oil. Make sure you inspect your feet after showers or baths. This is an especially good time to use the pumice stone as your feet will have just come out of the water.

Curing and Preventing Dry Feet

Some of the ways dry skin can be prevented include:

  • Wearing soft, cushiony socks
  • Use wide and comfortable shoes with low heels
  • Use soft insoles that allow the feet to breathe
  • Soak any corns or callouses in warm water
  • Regularly use pumice stones
  • Frequently apply oil or lotion

If you believe you have dry skin or any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.


By Clark Podiatry Center
March 12, 2019
Category: Athletic Foot Care

If you’re an athlete, you know from experience that your feet are very important to your performance. Agility and coordination are crucial and making sure your feet continue delivering their best depends on how you treat them. Different activities place different stress on your feet.  Martial arts require quick repetitive movements that strike hard trauma inducing objects, whereas aerobic exercises like gymnastics demand strong cushioning and balance. Team orientated sports like football, baseball, and basketball can strain ankles and knees making stretching very important.

Some of the most common problems athletes experience include:

  • Ankle sprains. With most of a person’s weight placed on each leg, the ankle suffers if it isn’t supported and strengthened.
  • Heel issues. Constant pounding on hard surfaces can cause problems with an athlete’s heel making walking or running very difficult and painful.
  • Stress fractures. Insufficient cushioning can steadily lead to small fissures in a person’s bones.
  • Achilles tendon. The irritation and possible separating of the main tendon at the back of the foot. This is very painful and can end an athletic career.
  • Morton’s neuroma. A hardening of the skin at the ball of an athlete’s foot.

All the above problems can be treated with a little care and attention. First, making sure your feet are well rested and stretched before any performance is important. Stretching will include not just your feet, but other parts of your body as well. Slowly increasing your range of motion is your goal, as is strengthening muscles in and around your feet. Doing so will help absorb the shock and stress often associated with athletic competition keeping you ‘on your toes.’

It is not uncommon to see an athlete bob up and down as he or she pushes his muscles and tendons during a pregame stretch, however this can be very dangerous if they are not careful. Too much bouncing can pull a muscle, just the opposite of what you want. A slow, steady, yet tolerable stretch is best as it extends the muscle but does not strain it.

Stretching is a good habit to get into whether you’re an athlete or not. Doing so when you wake in the morning will get your blood flowing and allow you to start the day more physically and mentally prepared.

If you have any questions about these posts or would like to see the doctor, please make an appointment with us.  Our podiatrist, Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children’s Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.  


By Clark Podiatry Center
March 05, 2019
Category: Heel pain
Tags: x-ray   Flat Feet   Plantar Fasciitis   Orthotics   Shoes   stretch   MRI  

The foot is one of the most complicated parts of the human body. With 19 separate muscles, 26 bones, 33 joints, and at least 107 ligaments and tendons, it is easy to see why taking care of your feet is very important. One of the common ailments many people experience is called Plantar fasciitis, a painful inflammation of connective tissue that runs across the bottom of the foot connecting the heel bone to the rest of the foot.  Plantar Fasciitis is commonly experienced by people whose feet constantly pound hard, flat surfaces and are often caused by Heel Spurs or bony protrusions of calcium on the heel.

Risk Factors for Plantar Fasciitis

  • Age - Between the ages of 40 and 60.
  • Diabetes
  • Exercise -  Activities that put a lot of stress on your heel - long-distance running, jumping activities, basketball, ballet, and aerobic dance.
  • Foot mechanics - Having flat feet, a high arch or an abnormal pattern of walking that distributes weight unevenly on the foot.
  • Obesity - Being overweight.
  • Occupation - Factory workers, teachers, construction workers, athletes, nurses and others who walk or stand a lot on hard surfaces.

Some of the ways to avoid Plantar Fasciitis

  • Lose weight.
  • Always wear appropriate athletic shoes.
  • Wear shoes that are supportive, have good arch support and absorb shock well.
  • Stretch and warm up before exercising.
  • See your doctor if you suspect you have Plantar Fasciitis.

If you do see your doctor, there are several ways to treat the ailment depending on the severity of the inflammation. They include:

  • Examination- Physical examination of the inflamed site.
  • X-Ray or MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) to see if there is a damaged nerve or fracture.
  • Ultrasound
  • Medicine - Doctor prescribed mostly over the counter pain meds.
  • Stretching - ligaments, tendons, and muscles before exercise especially.  
  • Therapy -  Physical Therapy, Night Splints and the use of Orthotics.
  • Surgery - At times this may be necessary if other methods are not successful.

If you have any questions or would like to see a podiatrist, please make an appointment with our friendly staff. Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470. If you have concerns with your children’s feet, Dr. Macy specializes in pediatrics and can assess your children’s feet at New Jersey Children’s Foot Health Institute.


Patients are always asking why their ingrown nails keep coming back and why can't they be cut "properly" -- whatever that means--so that the problem never comes back.

Unfortunately, the shape of a toenail can't be changed by cutting it different—straight across, back on an angle or the anachronistic V-shaped notch in the middle of the nail (which has never worked going back to cave-man days). Nails grow straight out toward the tip of the toe.  Ingrown nails are nails which have curled so that the edges can't grow past the skin of the nail groove on the side and poke into the skin. A sharp edge or a poorly trimmed nail can break through the skin in which case an infection can ensue.

In these circumstances, cutting the nail better in the corners can help, but temporarily at best. And if frequent infections are the norm, even small ones, then the best way to deal with the problem is to fix it on a lasting basis by performing an in-office procedure called a matrixectomy. Simply put, this is done by making the nail more narrow on the affected side and then cauterizing the so-called "root" of the nail so that the removed portion does not return at all.

If you'd like to see a video of such a procedure, click on video below.  A word of warning: this is an actual surgical procedure and the contents are graphic in nature.

 

 

This particular patient had a problem with a border of both great toenails. The amount of nail removed is determined by how much the nail curls under. We remove as little as possible, but just the right amount to correct the problem

The process of cauterization takes about 60-90 seconds per nail border. Once again, what we're trying to do is to destroy the nail matrix or "root" of the nail in the area in order to prevent that part of the nail from ever growing back. Numbness from the local anesthetic lasts for a few hours and typically there is little or no need for pain medication afterwards, nothing more than ibuprofen or Tylenol.

We provide a wound care kit to use for postoperative care beginning the next day. The old bandages are removed, the toe is rinsed, dried and a small amount of medication is put into the nail groove and the area covered with a band aid. This is done once or twice per day until healing is complete.

Overall healing time is 2-3 weeks with little or no disability. The procedure is quick, simple and VERY successful at relieving the pain of an ingrown toenail once and for all.

For more information or an appointment, contact us at 732-382-3470 or visit our website at www.clarkpodiatry.com.  

At Clark Podiatry Center, we want to keep you walking! 

 



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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470