732-382-3470
 

Find Us

Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Archive:

Tags

Categories:

Have a question? Find answers and other helpful topics in our digital library.

 

   

  

Posts for: February, 2019

By Clark Podiatry Center
February 26, 2019
Category: Heel pain

Sore soles at the end of a long day of standing or walking; burning or tingling pain when you get out of bed in the morning; pain at the base of your heel. These are all symptoms associated with plantar fasciitis foot pain. While it might not be completely debilitating, it can definitely cause extreme discomfort and cause your whole body to feel tired.

Those who suffer from chronic plantar fasciitis pain know the uncomfortable feeling. The soreness of the feet can ruin plans for the evening or prevent you from wanting to be active. That’s why they might also know that prevention is the key to reduce the risk of experiencing pain each day (and night).

Here are a few ways to prevent or treat mild foot pain before it gets worse:

  • Cushioned shoes with arch and heel support.
  • RICE method – Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation after a long day. This will help prevent symptoms from developing when you take your shoes off and relax. Tip: freeze some water bottles and use them to apply ice and massage your feet.
  • Foot massagers: there are several different types you can use, such as a golf ball, lacrosse ball, foot rollers, an automatic foot massager, or a foot soak with massagers built in. Finally, there’s the tried and true partner foot massage, if available.
  • Exercises to prevent plantar fasciitis pain: 1. Calf stretches like pulling your toes toward you when you have your feet stretched in front of you. 2. Low squat with the heels down to stretch the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia. 3. Point and flex the feet whenever you’re sitting at your desk or watching TV.

If you know that you’ve worked your feet harder than usual, perhaps during a hike or a difficult workout, try some of the above tips to prevent painful symptoms from settling in. If you’re familiar with chronic plantar fasciitis pain, you may also need to use NSAIDs to prevent inflammation of the ligament.

Need help with chronic severe plantar fasciitis pain? See our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet and find the best treatment for any concern you may have. Make an appointment at our Clark, NJ office so we can keep you walking.


By Clark Podiatry Center
February 18, 2019
Category: warts
Tags: Plantar Warts   warts   basic foot care  

As children learn to share with their siblings and friends, they can get good at sharing a lot of things – including germs. This includes everything from the common cold to fungal and viral skin infections, like – you guessed it – warts.

The virus that causes warts only needs is a small opening in the skin, such as a scratch or cut. Then, warts spread easily from one area of the skin to another, and also from person to person, just by skin contact with the wart. The virus causes rapid skin growth in the infected area, which causes the bumpy growth.

Warts are usually harmless and painless but can be embarrassing and bothersome, especially when they are on the feet. Plantar warts can become hard and make it feel like you are walking with a pebble in your shoe.

If your child has one or more plantar warts, you can treat them with:

  • A Salicylic Acid wart treatment (over the counter)
  • Cryotherapy (over the counter options are available, or with a stronger solution at your doctor’s office)
  • Surgical removal (by your doctor)

You can reduce the risk of infection and spreading warts with the following tips:

  • Basic foot care – Help your children wash their feet each night. This can help reduce the germs that might cause infection. You should also check for cuts and scrapes since that’s the way that viruses can infect the skin.
  • Try not to let your children be barefoot in public areas – if they will be barefoot, make sure to wash and dry feet shortly after.
  • Do not allow children to share shoes, socks, or towels.
  • Keep your child from picking at warts, as they can spread to other parts of the body.
  • If someone in the home has warts, treat them right away.

If your child has persistent plantar warts that just won’t go away even with treatment, see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your child’s feet at New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute and find the best treatment for your child’s feet. Make an appointment at our Clark, NJ office so we can keep your child walking.


By Clark Podiatry Center
February 13, 2019
Category: Shoes
Tags: blisters   calluses   ingrown toenails   overpronation   Running   injury   fit  

Gearing up to participate in a running event is no simple task. If you want to do your best, you’ll want to start training months in advance, especially if you are running a long race. Additionally, you’ll want the best gear to support you and keep you safe from injury.

What gear could we mean? Your running shoes, of course! To keep your feet supported and as comfortable as possible during your training and the actual race, look for the following features when choosing your running shoes:

  • Shoes designed for running – While cross-trainers and other athletic shoes could work, running shoes are designed with running in mind.
  • Fit – Make sure that the shoes fit the feet well. They shouldn’t be too big or too small as that can also cause problems.
  • Lots of cushion – The repetitive impact you encounter while running can impact your feet, ankles, knees, and hips. This can cause pain while you run, which can limit your performance.
  • Arch and heel support – The arches will be working hard to keep your entire foot engaged. If the arches become tired, they may flatten out, which can cause you pain toward the end of your race and for days after. Additionally, the heels need to be planted in heel cups so that they don’t slide about in the shoes, causing instability.
  • Firm heel counter – A firm heel counter will increase support in the shoes. It will help prevent overpronation (straining the arches) and keep the feet stabilized in the shoes.
  • Good outer sole grip – You’ll most likely be running outdoors during these events, so you’ll want shoes that have a good grip on the outer soles. At any point, if there are slippery or slick surfaces, it can create instability for your feet while you run if you don’t have good or enough tread.
  • Breathable material that supports and flexes at appropriate points – When you check the shoes and take it for a test run, make sure that your feet are not overheating. This is a sign that your shoes are not breathable and can cause you to excessively sweat. That will make perfect conditions to cause foot issues like foot odor, blisters, and calluses.

As you prepare, make sure you keep good hygiene, trim your toenails properly (to prevent ingrown toenails), and stretch your feet and ankles before and after each run. If you experience an injury, it’s important to rest and recover, rather than continuing to train on it.

If you experience foot pain while you are training, see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet and find the best treatment for any concern you may have. Make an appointment at our Clark, NJ office so we can keep you walking (or running!).


By Clark Podiatry Center
February 06, 2019

Your children grow up in what seems like a blink of the eye. They start to crawl, take their first steps, are running, and jumping, and before you know it, tying their own shoelaces! Then it’s off to college!

Okay, so it’s not quite that quick, but time sure can fly by. That’s why we want to encourage you to start teaching your children to take care of their feet early. Children are pretty perceptive and can learn by example starting from a young age. Take advantage of the years when they are soaking up knowledge and teach them some of the following ways to take care of their own feet:

  • Washing feet – This is a skill they can learn as they learn to wash their bodies during bath time. Have them reach their toes while they are sitting, and gently rub, rub, rub. Remind them to clean the tops and bottoms of their feet, as well as in between the toes and under the toenails. Teach them to properly dry their feet and moisturize if their skin is dry.
  • Wearing socks with shoes – Other than with sandals, teach them that they need to always wear socks before they put on their shoes. Children’s feet can get just as sweaty and stinky as our feet, so it’s important that they wear socks. That way, their shoes will not become stinky! Additionally, wearing shoes without socks can lead to blisters, corns, and calluses, which can be painful for your little one.
  • Understanding how their feet fit into shoes – As your children’s feet grow, observe their feet when they seem to either not put their shoes on, or want to take them off quickly. Look for any redness or swelling as these signs can indicate that shoes are too small. When you buy new shoes, have them try the shoes on and ask them if their toes have room to wiggle. Are the feet sliding around in the shoes? Do they feel snug or are they clunky? As they get older, they will recognize whether or not shoes fit them correctly.
  • Feeling out when they need to have their toenails trimmed – It’s not always easy to be on top of when your children need to have their toenails trimmed. When they are old enough, you can teach them to trim their own toenails, but before then, you’ll need to teach them an approximate length in which they should come to you for a trim. When the whites reach the edge of their toes, or when they feel the nails hit the top or front of their shoes (which can cause ingrown toenails) are both good times to trim toenails.
  • Foot exercises – Children generally get a lot of foot exercise from their general playtime. However, it doesn’t hurt to teach them some exercises by example. When watching TV together, you can help them with motor skills by doing foot circles or testing their ABCs in a silly way – draw them with your feet!

If you need tips on how to help your child with foot care, come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your child’s feet at New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute and find the best treatment for any concern you may have for your child’s feet. Make an appointment at our Clark, NJ office so we can keep your child walking.




Questions or Comments?
We encourage you to contact us whenever you have an interest or concern about our services.

Call Today 732-382-3470

1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470