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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for: April, 2018

By Clark Podiatry Center
April 25, 2018
Category: Laser therapy

Some of the worst villains in movie history use “lasers” in their plan to destroy the world. In the podiatry world, however, we use lasers for good, not for evil. When the terrible, horrible symptoms of pain and inflammation wreak havoc on your feet and ankles, you look to lasers for help.

Laser therapy is typically an option after conservative treatments prove to be unsuccessful. It uses a focused light beam to stimulate healing by encouraging cell metabolism. The treatment is easy and healing time is reduced. What would normally take months to properly heal now takes only a few treatments (about 10-12) of about 10 minutes per session.

For foot pain, a laser is commonly used to treat:

  • Plantar fasciitis – arch or heel pain due to strained plantar fascia ligaments; usually affects people with flat feet or high arches.
  • Achilles tendonitis – heel pain in the back of the heel bone (Achilles) due to a strained foot or ankle sprain; often due to over or under pronation.
  • Neuromas – numbness or pain due to thickened nerve tissue in a specific area; typically experienced if you wear shoes that put excessive force on a specific part of your feet, such as the balls of the feet.

If you’ve been suffering from foot pain, well why wouldn’t you want fast, easy, painless treatment?

But did you know that a laser can also be used to fight the battle against fungal toenails! While the fungal infection might not be causing terrible, horrible pain, they could be the cause of your ugly, brittle, discolored toenails. Unfortunately, you probably picked it up from a family member or from walking barefoot in the gym locker room.

If left untreated, the fungal infection can spread to the surrounding skin on the feet and cause a rash or scaly dry skin. It can spread from one part of the foot to the other because fungal toenails and Athlete’s foot are caused by the same fungus. Laser therapy can be used to treat the toenails so that new toenails do not grow back with a fungal infection!

So if you’ve got a persistent heel pain or fungal infection that won’t respond to conservative treatments, come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy for an assessment. If laser therapy is right for you, we can get started on treatments right away. Using orthotics in conjunction with laser therapy might be a treatment option too! Make an appointment today to have your feet treated with care. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all of Union County! We keep you walking!


By Clark Podiatry Center
April 18, 2018
Category: Common Treatments
Tags: corns   calluses   Bunions   Hammertoes   High Heels   Shoes   orthotic   deformities   gaits  

Do you have hardened bumps on your toes or patches of thickened skin on the bottom of your feet? Because of the various surfaces on which your feet walk, they have a way to protect themselves from harm. Skin begins to thicken in spots where they experience a lot of pressure or friction.

Who is likely to get corns and calluses?

Corns: Those with foot deformities like hammertoes, curly toes, claw toes, or bunions are more likely to experience corns. This is especially the case if you wear shoes that are too tight or too short. Additionally, those who stand or walk for long periods of time can experience constant friction. Corns are usually localized to a small, specific location, such as the toes.

Calluses: Those who wear high heels, have lost fat padding on the balls of the feet, or have abnormal gaits can experience constant pressure on certain wider parts of the feet, like at the base of the balls of the feet.

Should you treat corns and calluses at home? Or go see a podiatrist?

You may have noticed some over-the-counter corn and/or callus medications. Before applying any type of medications, try some of these following adjustments before corns or calluses become painful or to relieve painful symptoms:

  • Try wearing shoes that are snug, but not too tight. You shouldn’t buy shoes expecting that they will stretch out. Make sure you always wear socks with shoes to reduce friction on the skin of the feet.
  • There are pads you can apply to the areas of the shoes that seem to cause friction against the skin of the feet.

When the abovementioned tips don’t do trick, you may need to have corns or calluses filed down or removed by a podiatrist.  They may use one or more of the following:

  • Trim down or cut away thickened skin with a scalpel. Trying it at home can lead to an infection, so it’s best not to try this at home.
  • Use salicylic acid in patches or gels to remove corns or calluses.
  • Prescribe or custom-make orthotic inserts to cushion problems that develop from deformities or bony protrusions.

If your corns or calluses are painful and you need help treating them, make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Brandon Macy, DPM at Clark Podiatry Center. He can find the best treatment options to get you feeling better. Come see him at our Clark, NJ office, which serves the surrounding Union County areas.


By Clark Podiatry Center
April 11, 2018
Category: Shoes

They will say, “beauty is pain” or “fashion over function” and even “all the other girls have them,” but keep resisting. While for some of you, buying your daughter her first pair of high heels is something to look forward to, take a step back and consider why you might want to wait.

These days, girls seem to begin to wear high heels around middle school. And while they probably won’t be wearing them every day or for long periods of time, girls can experience strain on their growing bodies because high heels put their bodies out of alignment. This means that not only are the feet and ankles at risk of pain and injury, so are the knees, hips, back, and spine. Since girls keep growing until their early 20s, it’s important that they are allowed to develop properly to prevent problems later on.

However, if they insist on their first pair, and you can’t seem to resist buying it for them (or they bought it without your knowledge), here are a few tips to share with your daughter to reduce the risk of injury and foot strain:

  • Purchase high heels that have more support. Make sure they fit well, have some cushion, and maybe even some arch and heel support.
  • If your shoes are tight and squish your toes, take every opportunity to take your feet out and stretch them. This can prevent problems like hammertoes and bunions.
  • Wear them for short periods of time, such as special occasions or a school dance. The longer you wear them, the more you are at risk of having back problems.
  • Strengthen the feet and ankles. Chances are your daughter has not been working out her feet or ankles, so they will be more prone to straining the feet (plantar fasciitis) and ankles, as well as to getting injured.

Remember, they will have plenty of opportunities to wear high heels when they become older and join the workforce. At that time, they may have to wear high heels even if they don’t want to. So why start them so early with high heels?

If you or your daughter suffers an injury or pain from wearing high heels, come see us at our office. Make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Brandon Macy, DPM at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet and then offer the best treatment options to get you back to pounding the pavement. Come see him at our Clark, NJ office, which serves the surrounding Union County areas.


By Clark Podiatry Center
April 04, 2018
Category: Plantar fasciitis

One of the most common causes of pain along the bottom of the feet is plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a thick band of tissue (ligament) that connects the toes to the heel bone. When it is strained or injured, the body responds with inflammation, sending us signals that something is wrong. Painful and/or tingly sensations can be felt after a long period of rest (i.e. sleeping), as well as after intense exercise.

Arch Pain

Those who have high arches, overpronate (walk with arches flat on the ground and ankles rolling inward), wear high heels, or play sports with repetitive impact motions are more likely to experience arch pain with plantar fasciitis. These risk factors cause more strain on the plantar fascia.

Heel Pain

Over time, the ligament can pull on the bone enough to cause a bone spur to develop on the bottom/front of the heel bone. This can cause pain with each step since a bony growth begins to protrude. Like with arch pain due to plantar fasciitis, those who play sports including running, jumping or sudden twisting movements (i.e. golf) can feel heel pain.

If you suspect that you have symptoms of plantar fasciitis, you will want to take measures to prevent it from getting worse. You can try stretching the feet and calves when you wake up in the morning, massaging the plantar fascia ligament with a small ball, enjoying a warm foot soak, as well as using additional orthotic inserts or padding. For those with high arches or fallen arches, orthotics can help support the irregular shape of the foot so that the ligament does not have to strain so much to stabilize.

Have you tried some of these techniques and still found that your plantar fasciitis is getting worse? Come see us for podiatrist-prescribed treatment, such as physical therapy or laser therapy at our office. Make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Brandon Macy, DPM at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet and the best treatment options to get you back on track.  Come see him at our Clark, NJ office, which serves the surrounding Union County areas.




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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470