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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for: January, 2018

Our last blog post was about how problems regarding inflammation of the Achilles tendon, called Achilles Tendonitis, come about. For those who experience symptoms of pain from Achilles tendonitis, we’ve got your back (of the heel)!  Read on for options for treatment, as well as means of prevention.

Ways to treat symptoms of pain and inflammation:

  • A foot and ankle massage can relieve tightness and painful symptoms. You can use a bottle or foam roller for massaging the lower calf.
  • Apply a cold compress or ice to the area for very painful moments.
  • NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), such as Ibuprofen or naproxen can mitigate pain and swelling.
  • Physical Therapy, including stretching and strengthening exercises, can help to prevent worsening issues, such as small tears or ruptures.
  • Over-the-counter or custom orthotics can provide support to weakened ankles. It can also prevent worsening symptoms due to excessive strain.
  • Wear a boot to restrict further movement and therefore, irritation to the tendon.
  • Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) is a non-invasive therapy for Achilles tendonitis.

However, the best way to deal with Achilles tendonitis is to prevent symptoms in the first place. Here are some ways to prevent symptoms:

  • Stretch the calf muscles in the morning and evening, and before and after a workout.
  • Strengthen the calf muscles to reduce strain on the back of the heels.
  • Use cushioned shoes when participating in high impact sports and activities. When weightlifting, use shoes with a small raised heel and heel cups to stabilize the feet.
  • Take it easy when increasing your intensity or volume of your workout because going too fast too hard can cause an Achilles injury.

If home treatments have not helped and there are no other options, surgery may be required. To figure out your best treatment option is to make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet and give them the treatment or orthotic support they need. Come see him at our Clark, NJ office.


       

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From simple athlete’s foot to eczema to skin cancers such as melanoma, all sorts of skin disorders can be found on the feet. Some are nuisances but others can be much more serious, however the most important factor in successful treatment is proper and prompt diagnosis.

Athlete’s foot can have many appearances—it can look like dry skin, may or may not be itchy and can be on any part of the foot, not just the toes.  But not all rashes are athlete’s foot.  Eczema, psoriasis and other disorders are all possible.  How to differentiate them?  Simple and usually painless skin biopsies sent to the lab will give us the right diagnosis and set us in the right direction for treatment.

Regardless of the season, whether you go on an island vacation in winter or the Jersey shore in summer, you can’t forget about skin cancers.  Melanoma constitutes 1 percent of skin cancers, but causes more cancer deaths than any other skin cancer. Between 3 and 15 percent of melanomas occur on the foot. 

The first symptom in feet is usually a changing or unusual mole.  Sometimes it can be a dark streak under a nail plate.

The surprising fact is that just because a mole has been there ‘forever’, doesn’t guarantee that it is benign.  Early diagnosis is critical for skin cancers.  A biopsy will provide either peace of mind or a prompt entry into treatment protocols with improved chances of positive outcomes.

Here’s the takeaway point:  Have skin rashes examined and biopsied as needed for accurate diagnosis and treatment. Check suspicious symptoms with the ’CUBED’ acronym:  Is it Colored, Uncertain, Bleeding, Enlarged, or is there a Delay in healing of the lesions?  Don’t shy away from having a simple biopsy performed.  It could save your life.

For more information or an appointment, contact us at 732-382-3470 or visit our website at www.clarkpodiatry.com

At Clark Podiatry Center, we want to keep you walking! 

#melanoma #skincancer #ClarkPodiatry

 


Did you know that the Achilles tendon (strong fibrous tissue that attaches the calf muscle to the back of the heel bone) is the largest tendon in the body? Without proper functioning Achilles tendons, we wouldn’t be able to walk or run! And because it is so involved in our daily lives as well as in the movements that playing sports entails, it’s also one of the most likely tendons to be inflamed or injured/ruptured.

Inflammation of the Achilles tendon is called Achilles Tendonitis. Depending on the location of the inflammation, middle or lower part of the tendon, it is classified as noninsertional or insertional Achilles tendonitis; the “insertional” part describes whether or not it’s affected at the part that inserts into the heel bone). Noninsertional Achilles tendonitis tends to occur in younger active people, while Insertional Achilles tendonitis can occur to non-active people as well, and is often accompanied by a bony spur.

Symptoms include:

  • Tenderness and/or stiffness of the Achilles tendon, especially when you wake up.
  • Thickened portions of the tendon (a bump), where tissues may be tearing.
  • Swelling or pain that gets worse with activity or after activity.
  • Pain the day after exercising.
  • Bone spur where the Achilles tendon meets the heel bone.

Causes of Achilles Tendonitis:

  • Not warming up before vigorous exercises, such as sprints or hill climbs.
  • Sudden changes in the intensity of exercise.
  • Wearing the wrong footwear, such as worn down or unsupportive shoes, while exercising.
  • Constantly running on hard pavement (increasing impact on the Achilles tendon) or uneven surfaces (straining the tendon and forcing it to flex more normal).
  • Flat feet, over-pronation, and/or fallen arches can put more strain on the Achilles tendon as it stretches and flexes at an angle.
  • Bone spurs can rub against the tendon, causing tears and inflammation.

Risk Factors:

  • It’s more likely to affect men than women.
  • The Achilles tendon weakens with age, so you’re more likely to experience it as you get older.
  • Those with flat feet or fallen arches are more likely to be affected.
  • Those with psoriasis or high blood pressure are at higher risk.
  • Side effects of certain medications, such as fluoroquinolone, include increased the risk of being affected by Achilles tendonitis, even after they stop the medication.

If you think you or your family member is being affected by pain from Achilles tendonitis, make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet and give them the treatment or orthotic support they need. Come see him at our Clark, NJ office.


 

Why Do My Toes Go Numb WHen I Exercise?

Many patients notice that when they exercise, particularly on a treadmill or elliptical exerciser, that the toes on one or both feet go numb, relieved when they stop the workout.   The sensation is similar to when you sit down in an awkward position and your foot or leg “falls asleep”.

What actually occurs in these situations is some form of prolonged or repetitive pressure on a nerve that creates a nerve block much like when you receive a local anesthetic. In the exercise example, this can be the result of a shoe that is too tight in the toe box—by fit or from wearing thicker socks.  The surprising fact is that this can also happen in a shoe which is too loose-fitting where the foot can slide forward and jam into the toe box of the shoe.  This can also happen on the top of the foot when shoes are too tight across the instep.

What to do about it?  Make sure your workout shoes fit properly taking into account the socks you wear.  If the problem is on the top of the foot, the lacing pattern needs to be adjusted, either loosening them in the spot of maximum pressure or by changing the lacing pattern of the shoes, avoiding the pressure spots. Click here for shoe lacing ideas.

The takeaway point is this:  If the shoe fits, wear it—unless it is too tight in the toes or the top of the foot. That should prevent or relieve exercise-related numbness.

For more information or an appointment, contact us at 732-382-3470 or visit our website at www.clarkpodiatry.com

At Clark Podiatry Center, we want to keep you walking! 

#ClarkPodiatryCenter #NJCFHI #numbtoes

 


By Clark Podiatry Center
January 10, 2018

As children’s bodies continue to grow, they may also develop issues that cause them pain. However, keep in mind that growing pains are not normal when it comes to feet. Any foot or ankle issues that they may experience indicate a foot problem that must be addressed to prevent further complications.

For the most part, children may grow out of certain conditions such as bow legs, flat feet, and in-toeing. Still, it’s important to come see our podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy, at The New Jersey Children’s Foot Health Institute as soon as they complain or seem to show signs of foot pain. Treating a problem early and using prevention methods are easier than trying to solve problems later, as they can become more complex and even require more invasive treatments, such as surgery.

A commonly prescribed treatment for children with foot problems is custom orthotics. They come in all shapes and sizes, and for mild symptoms, even over-the-counter inserts can be helpful. Dr. Macy can help you determine the best type of orthotics for your child’s needs.

In general, orthotics can be useful to relieve symptoms associated with:

  • Flat Feet: When the arches in the feet do not develop after learning to walk, children can experience pain along the bottom of the feet as the tendons and muscles around the arches strain to support the feet. Some children can “grow out of it” and develop arches later, but they should get supportive orthotics to relieve pain.
  • Overpronation: Often associated with flat feet, this is a condition in which the ankle bones tend to lean inward. This can cause strain on the ankle joints and heels as they grow out of alignment. Orthotics can help to support the feet and prevent the ankles from rolling inward.
  • Sever’s Disease (heel pain): This disease affects the growth plate at the base of the heel bone. It can be caused by repetitive stress or injury to the bottom of the foot, and is usually more common in active children. Orthotics can help displace the pressure placed on the growth plate to reduce inflammation and irritation.
  • Osgood Schlatters (knee pain): A painful bump below the kneecap can indicate inflammation to the knee, especially in children who run and jump and are experiencing growth spurts. Orthotics can be used to reduce the impact on the knees and relieve pain.

Is your child overpronating or complaining of foot or ankle pain? It’s important that their needs are addressed to prevent complications as they grow. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy can assess your children’s feet and give them the treatment or orthotic support they need. Come see him at Clark Podiatry Center. Make an appointment to see us today at our Clark, NJ office.




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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470