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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for: July, 2017

By Clark Podiatry Center
July 25, 2017
Tags: blisters   Orthotics   arch supports  

Not all shoes are created equal. The structure, material quality, and features of comfort and support vary from one shoe to the other. With all the heat and humidity lately, it’s tempting for you and your children to wear the most open-toed shoes (or even go barefoot) to keep cool. While sandals are usually better than flip-flops, not all are supportive for your children’s growing feet. Wearing sandals that do not have proper foot support can cause developmental problems as their bones and tissues continue to grow.

The following are some tips for caring for your children’s feet, and what shoes they should wear instead of flip-flops:

  • Beware of going barefoot outside – Going barefoot is good for children when walking around indoors. It encourages strong muscle development and you can more easily notice problems if any exist. However, children should wear shoes whenever they are outside as there is an increased risk of injury and contracting disease.
  • Stay away from flip-flops – Flip-flops in general are not very supportive or even necessarily safe to be walking around so much. The lack of support can leave you unstable and more prone to injury. Additionally, walking around in them for more than a distance of home to pool or pool to locker room can make your feet work harder and leave you with pain. Because children’s feet are still developing they need all the proper support before the bones fully set.
  • Look for these properties in sandals – Key components of supportive shoes for children are: arch supports, heel cupping, and shock absorption. As they continue to grow, arch and heel support will help their feet to grow normally, especially if they are flatfooted or pronating. Also, since children like to run around, shock absorption will help reduce risk of repetitive injury pain (or even stress fracture). Sandals that do no fit well can cause them blisters and make them trip, so make sure that they try the sandals on in store.
  • Sneakers are best – In most cases, supportive sneakers are the best shoes to wear. Find ones that have good support, but have breathable materials like mesh and cotton canvas. Don’t forget to have them wear socks with their sneakers – if sweating is an issue, you can carry around a spare pair of socks. Plus, the closed-toed nature of sneakers makes them less prone to sunburn! (The same goes for water shoes at the water park!)

Have a question about appropriate shoes for your children’s foot development? Or maybe they need some orthoses. Whatever the case, come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy. Make an appointment today at The New Jersey Children's Foot Heath Institute at Clark Podiatry Center to have your children’s feet assessed and treated with care. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns! We keep you walking!

 


A common concern that parents have when they come in to see us at The New Jersey Children's Foot Heath Institute, is Pigeon Toeing or Intoeing. This means that when they walk or run, the one or both feet point inward, toward the other, rather than straight ahead. 

However, you don’t need to be alarmed just yet! When children first begin to walk, their muscles and bones are not yet fully developed, so it can be normal for toddlers to have a pigeon-toe gait and appear bow-legged. However, if the problem is severe, or if it doesn’t correct itself after the age of 2, some intervention may be necessary. 

What causes it?

Intoeing can develop during pregnancy, as a birth defect, or due to hereditary factors (children who have a parent that had a pigeon-toed gait are more likely to have this problem). There’s not much that can be done to prevent it, but treating non-correcting intoeing earlier can make for better results. The main causes include: 

  • metatarsus adductus (foot deformity where it turns inward), 
  • tibial torsion (shin bone turns inward), or 
  • femoral anteversion (inwardly rotated upper leg bone). 

When to see a Podiatrist

Most cases of pigeon toeing can resolve on their own when the children are about 8 or 9, especially metatarsus adductus and femoral anteversion. Because there is no easy way to tell if a child will grow out of it, consulting our podiatrist is a good idea. Additionally, if your child seems to fall or trip often, orthotics may be necessary to help stabilize him or her in her everyday walking. For severe cases, surgery may be required to correctly align the position of the bones.

If your child complains about pain in the feet, ankles, knees, or hips, or has problems walking, come see us. For the best treatment options, come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy. Make an appointment today at The New Jersey Children's Foot Heath Institute at Clark Podiatry Center to have your child’s intoe-ing assessed and treated with care. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns! We keep you walking!

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
July 13, 2017

At The New Jersey Children's Foot Heath Institute, we know that your children’s health is extremely important to you. So today, we have a top tip for you: When it comes to your children’s feet, growing pains are not normal. Pain in the feet usually indicates that something is wrong. Without treatment, some pain may linger and even worsen over time. Worst-case scenario, children’s bones can develop or form incorrectly when problems are not treated promptly. We can help!

 

If your child complains about pain, there are several possible causes behind it:

 

  • Achilles Tendonitis – The Achilles tendon connects the calf muscle to the heel bone. When the Achilles tendon is strained, such as when there is a sudden increase in activity or change in intensity of activity, it can become inflamed, causing pain in the back of the heel. It is also a common overuse injury for children who participate in sports with repetitive activities like running and jumping. 
  • Plantar Fasciitis – Another overuse injury, the connective tissues along the bottom of the feet that connect the midfoot to the heel can become irritated and inflamed. Running, walking, or standing for long periods of time, as well as intense activity can make it worse, especially if shoes are not supportive in the arches. As the tissues become tight, the heels may feel pain. 
  • Heel Spurs – This is a bony growth that protrudes from the heel. It can happen if the plantar fascia is constantly tight or inflamed. When the bone is developing or healing, it may develop a spur to compensate for problems in the feet. These spurs can be painful if weight is put on them. 
  • Sever’s Disease – Typically brought on during sports or injury, the growth plate of a developing heel bone can become irritate. A tight Achilles tendon can aggravate the problem by pulling excessively on the growth plate. It can also cause the feet to flatten, further worsening problems in the feet. 
  • Fractures – Repeated use of the heel or traumatic injury can cause fractures. The growing heel bone in your children’s feet are more at risk of fracture since they are not yet fully formed. Children playing high impact sports are more prone to this injury.

 

If your child complains about heel pain, do not hesitate to bring him or her into our office. The earlier any of these conditions are treated, the better the healing time and outcome. For the best treatment, come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy. Make an appointment today at The New Jersey Children's Foot Heath Institute at Clark Podiatry Center to have your child’s heel pain assessed and treated with care. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns! We keep you walking!

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
July 05, 2017
Category: Ankle Pain

The excitement of drafting Malik Monk to the Charlotte Hornets quickly simmered down after his ankle injury during the draft workout process. He suffered an ankle sprain and is expected to be out for about 2 to 4 weeks as he gets treatment. In the mean time, the rookie shooting guard will be learning about the team from the sidelines.  

What determines when he comes back?

A couple things should be considered after an ankle sprain: severity of the sprain, as well as time for healing and recovery.

Ankle Sprain Grades (according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons):

  • Mild Sprain (Grade 1) – Overstretching and/or small tears of the ligament fibers.
  • Moderate Sprain (Grade 2) – Partial tears of the ligament.
  • Severe Sprain (Grade 3) – Complete tear of the ligament.

Healing and Recovery:

  • Grade 1 Sprain – PRINCE: Protection, Rest, Ice, NSAIDs, Compression, and Elevation. Swelling should subside within a couple of days, but the ankle should not be vigorously used until it is healed and rehabilitated with strengthening exercises (which takes about 2 weeks).
  • Grade 2 Sprain – In addition to the above, a removable air cast or boot can be used to immobilize and protect the sprained ankle while it heals. Crutches will probably be needed to assist in mobility. Physical Therapy will then help with recovery to strengthen and condition the ankle for regular use. The whole process can take 6+ weeks.
  • Grade 3 Sprain – For this kind of severe sprain, a short leg cast or cast-brace will be needed to immobilize and protect the ankle. The healing process can take much longer and so does the rehab process (with physical therapy). The whole process can take about 6 to 12 weeks.

Ankle sprains occur from a bad twist or injury to the ligaments of the ankle. Most occur on the outside of the ankle and symptoms will include pain and swelling. They can occur in many settings, with most occurring during athletic activity. Because of this, it’s important to strengthen and condition the ankles regularly, as it can happen to anyone – even start athletes like Malik Monk!

To properly diagnose the sprain and determine the best treatment, it’s best to consult our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy. Make an appointment today at Clark Podiatry Center to have your ankle assessed and treated with care. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns! We keep you walking!

 




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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470