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Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for category: common foot conditions

By Clark Podiatry Center
August 07, 2019

There are many types of doctors a person can see, depending on what part of the body needs attention. For the heart it is a cardiologist, for the kidneys, it is a nephrologist, and for the skin, it’s a dermatologist. For your feet, though, it’s a podiatrist. But why see a podiatrist? Aren’t foot problems really minor and something you can handle yourself? Well, the answer is not quite so simple.

While some foot conditions can be treated at home, many can become very serious if they’re not treated appropriately and treated immediately. It is not uncommon for people to try to treat themselves, but it is also quite common for these treatments to really need professional care.

Some conditions that are best treated by a podiatrist and why include:

  • Corns and calluses – if not treated correctly can lead to blisters and infections
  • Bunions – usually are painful and indicative of more complicated factors. Also, it may require surgery
  • Hammertoe – can lead to other conditions and can also require surgery
  • Heel issues – will affect your gait if not properly diagnosed and lead to other issues, possibly with your back
  • Metatarsalgia – painful condition that is best diagnosed and treated by a professional
  • Athlete’s feet – can spread to hands and beyond and may require strong medicine prescribed by a doctor.
  • Plantar fasciitis – will likely require specific doctor prescribed medicine
  • Flat feet – can affect your gait and cause back issues. May require a custom orthotic
  • Severs disease – common in children, but not easily diagnosed unless by a trained professional
  • Neuromas – can feel like several other conditions. Only a podiatrist can properly diagnose
  • Diabetes – this is perhaps the most serious of conditions and if not cared for properly can lead to a series of very serious medical conditions and even amputation

In fact, just about any foot-related concern, a person can have needs to be looked at by a podiatrist. What may be a more complicated, but easily treated condition, can very easily be mistaken for something else? So why take the risk and especially regarding your children? With so much to do every day, why not leave the doctoring to the doctor? Take the time to let a professionally trained person handle foot related medical issues. It is, after all, why they went to school.

If you have any concerns about the health of your feet or just have questions, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
June 20, 2018

“Why are my feet so swollen?”

At the end of some days, you might notice that your feet are larger than they were when you woke up this morning. If you’ve been on your feet all day, whether from a job that requires standing or from walking all day, there’s a good chance that your feet will be a bit swollen. A slight swelling of the feet is natural in these cases, but edema (swelling) that is chronic, uneven, or severe can indicate a larger health problem.

Read on to find out if one of the causes below (other than standing for long periods of time) apply to you:

Injury, infection, Insect Bite, Inactivity

  • Injuries, including sports injuries to the feet, can cause swelling for several minutes to several days, depending on the severity of the impact.
  • An infection can cause swelling to the feet, especially if it is not treated properly, right away.
  • Those who are allergic to insect bites will also experience swelling if pests get a taste on the feet.
  • If you sit still or lie down for too long, the lack of circulation of blood and fluids can cause them to pool in the lower extremities, resulting in swollen feet.

Hormonal changes

  • Hormonal changes can sometimes cause swelling, particularly during the menstrual cycle and especially during pregnancy.
  • Pregnant women are likely to have swollen feet because of their changing body structure. As the baby grows, it can restrict circulation of blood and fluids back up from the legs and feet. The result is swollen feet that may require you to get shoes up to 2 sizes larger! You’ll want to put your feet up as often as you can.

Other health problems

  • Those who have varicose veins may experience poor circulation.
  • A blood clot is a serious problem in which the foot, ankle, or leg will show swelling. This usually occurs in one leg, as opposed to both legs.
  • Lymph problems can cause you to have poor circulation of fluids in your legs, causing swelling in the feet (lymphedema).
  • A symptom of heart, liver, or kidney problems is edema.

If you have swollen feet, try using the RICE method to reduce symptoms. If that doesn’t work, or if swelling persists, make an appointment to see us at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your feet to find the best treatment and make sure that you do not have underlying health problems. We are located in Clark, NJ and are ready to serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!

By Clark Podiatry Center
April 26, 2017

For some, the foot fungus, commonly known as Athlete’s foot can be a recurring condition that keeps coming back. Depending on exposure, hygiene, treatment, as well as immune system condition, some people can have Athlete’s foot continuously reappear on their feet. Also known as tinea pedis, this fungal infection causes itchy, red bumps between the toes, as well as dry, cracked, peeling skin along the bottom of the feet and heels. If it gets under the toenails, they become thick and discolored, making them unsightly and harder to manage.

Athlete’s Foot is Contagious

Chances are, you got Athlete’s foot from a shared space with someone else who had it. Walking barefoot in community pools, saunas, bathhouses, communal showers, and locker rooms, or sharing shoes or towels are typically how you may contract the fungal infection. They enter the body through breaks in the skin or between the toenails where it meets the skin and can spread to other parts of the feet as they thrive in your shoes. These fungi grow well in moist, warm, dark places, so your socks and shoes can be the problem.

Here are some tips to prevent contracting and spreading Athlete’s Foot:

  • You and your children should make sure to clean your feet each day. Wash your feet with warm water and soap and then let them fully dry before putting on new socks.
  • If you are barefoot in communal areas, use flip-flops instead to prevent coming into direct contact with the shared floors. Washing after being barefoot is very important, especially in activities that require bare feet, such as rock climbing or slacklining.
  • Rotate the shoes you wear each day so that they can completely dry out between wears. This will help kill off bacteria and fungi that are living in the shoes.

Because Athlete’s foot can affect anyone, including children, it is important to pay attention to the symptoms mentioned above. Treating foot fungus promptly will help prevent spreading and worsening of the problem. You can try using antifungal medications when you first notice the signs. However, if the condition keeps persisting, you may need to come in for treatment, possibly laser therapy at our office.

Need additional help? Make an appointment today at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your feet to find the best treatment for your foot fungus. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
March 01, 2017
Tags: Plantar Warts   verucca   virus  

Adults and children alike can contract plantar warts, or verucca. They are caused by a virus that enters openings in the skin, such as cuts, scrapes, or cracks in dry skin. They can manifest as round bumps on the bottom of the feet and are either flat or look like cauliflower. The most obvious symptom is that it causes you pain when you put pressure on it (or with every step you take).

Because the virus lives in moist areas, it’s easily spread from person to person by direct touch or using the same item as someone who has it. For children, it can happen on playgrounds or the public swimming pool. For adults, it can be the same, including gym locker rooms and communal showers.

For healthy people, plantar warts can come and go with no pain. However, since viruses can live in your body for long times, they can easily form warts again. The best defense is to practice healthy hygiene and prevent contracting the virus.

  • Wear flip-flops when on communal floors and try not to be barefoot on playgrounds and other gym or play areas.
  • After being barefoot, make sure to promptly wash your feet with soap and warm water.
  • Don’t share shoes with anyone with plantar warts and avoid direct contact with someone with warts.

When you have plantar warts, you can try to treat them with salicylic acid treatments at your local drugstore. Soft padding can help to reduce pressure on the plantar wart. If these remedies do not work, and the pain continues, make an appointment today to have our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy assess you (or your child’s warts). He may suggest treatments such as cryotherapy, chemical treatments, or surgery. Clark Podiatry Center is located in Clark, NJ office in Union County and our team is ready to help! We keep you walking.

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
September 15, 2016
Tags: Foot Odor   hyperhidrosis  

You may have heard that if you are not having a good night’s sleep, you may want to try sticking one or more feet out from under the covers. The feet become exposed to cooler air, which helps your overall body temperature to cool down as well. Why does this seem to work? Well, the feet have many special blood vessels that can open up and send heat out through them. Additionally, they have about 3,000 glands per square inch to release sweat and heat as well.

All the heat and sweat being released through the feet is great when barefoot, but what happens if they get trapped in socks and shoes? The increased heat and moisture together create an ideal environment for odor-causing bacteria to flourish. If the situation is not treated properly, the situation can continue to cause embarrassing issues for you.

Prevention Tips

One way to fight foot odor is to prevent it from happening in the first place. We at Clark Podiatry Center suggest the following:

  • When wearing closed-toed shoes, always wear socks. Even better if they are moisture-wicking socks.

  • Try to wear shoes that allow your feet to breathe – e.g. leather, canvas, mesh.

  • Clean your feet each day in warm water with soap. Let them dry thoroughly and check for signs of rash or infections.

  • Rotate shoes from day to day and wear a clean pair of socks (or 2) each day. Allow your shoes to fully dry in between wears.

  • Use baby powder or foot powder on your feet to absorb sweat.

Treatment Options

Embarrassing foot odor can prevent you from going to social events and even cause discomfort for others in enclosed spaces, like planes. You may be embarrassed even to bring up your foot odor issues with your foot doctor. Dr. Brandon Macy, our board-certified podiatrist understands that you may have discomfort with this and will treat your foot issues with care and respect. Some options he may give you are:

  • Home treatment: Soak your feet in a solution of strong black tea (plus cool water) for 30 minutes each week to kill off bacteria and close pores. A mixture of vinegar and water works as well.

  • Ongoing foot odor can be caused by an infection or hereditary excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis). Dr. Macy may prescribe a prescription ointment, which you can use overnight with a wrap.

  • Iontophoresis may reduce the sweating for those with hyperhidrosis.

  • In the most severe cases, a surgeon can cut the nerve that controls sweat to stop sweating in the feet, but it may increase sweating in other areas instead.

If you are undergoing hormonal changes, taking certain medications, or enduring a stressful time in your life, you may be more prone to sweating. Whether this is a new or persistent issue, make an appointment today by calling us at Clark Podiatry Center: (732) 382-3470.



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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470