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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for category: children's foot care

By Clark Podiatry Center
December 03, 2019

At Clark Podiatry Center, we know that things can become quite busy during the holidays. As children wind down for a break from school, don’t forget to take time to watch and listen for any new signs of foot pain. As you’re moving from store to store or baking your favorite holiday treats, here are three signs to watch for during the holidays: children's foot pain

Ready, set … no

If you’re noticing that your typically high-energy child is taking a seat on the sidelines, check in with your child. They could be saving their energy for the big dinners ahead, but they may also be in pain while moving. Keep in mind that younger children may not be able to communicate their discomfort; instead, they may stop doing what is causing them the pain.

Shoes off

If your child is taking their shoes off as soon as you put them on, or if they’re crying, it’s time to ask some questions. When was the last time you had your child’s foot measured? Has an injury occurred? Talk with your child and work with them to see if they can communicate their reason for kicking off their shoes so quickly.  

Smelly shoes

Your kids have been working hard in school, but their shoes shouldn’t be delivering a strong odor. If you notice smelly socks and shoes, your children might be dealing with Athlete’s foot or a fungal nail. Use the holiday season to thoroughly wash and dry socks and determine if it’s time for another pair of shoes. As your children travel to see family or friends, encourage them to keep on their shoes and socks; don’t share them with others.

If you think your child is experiencing foot pain, don’t feel like you need to wait until 2020 to get some answers. Schedule an appointment with Clark Podiatry Center by calling 732-382-3470. Dr. Brandon A. Macy is a board-certified podiatrist, and New Jersey’s Children’s Foot Health Institute is also part of the Clark Podiatry Center. Visit us at our Clark, New Jersey office.

By Clark Podiatry Center
September 05, 2019

Many children’s foot conditions will correct themselves as their bodies grow into themselves and muscles and bones stretch. Some though, if they persist, need to be addressed. Toe walking is one. What is toe walking? Just that. When the child walks only on their toes and doesn’t roll the foot to the ball.

This is usually prevalent when they begin to walk at age 12 to 15 months. By the age of 2, they usually have developed a heel-toe type of walk. If toe walking persists after 3, they need to see a podiatrist. One study, though, showed that a group of children grew out of toe walking by age 5.

Causes for toe walking after 3 include:

  • Cerebral palsy – condition of impaired muscle control
  • Autism – a broad range of problems including socialization skills, speech, non-verbal communication and repetitive actions
  • Muscle weakness
  • Nervous system disorder

Conditions that indicate concern include:

  • Walks on their toes all the time
  • Stumbles when they walk
  • Has fine motor skills that aren’t developing – buttoning a shirt
  • Has a family history of cerebral palsy or autism
  • Doesn’t bear full weight on a flat foot
  • Born prematurely
  • Avoids eye contact or has repetitive motions like rocking

It is very important to keep an eye on a child’s when walking which may or may not indicate other contributing issues, but don’t be too surprised to know that toe walking may just be that: toe walking which your child will grow out or can be successfully treated.

Treatments include physical therapy to stretch the calf muscle and tendons and the use of a cast at ages 4 or 5 to also help stretch the calf muscle. Other treatments include walking uphill, walking on uneven surfaces like a playground or sand, walking on your heels only and/or squatting. All these will stretch the foot and force it to roll and fully contact the ground.

If you’re child toe walks or you have any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
May 01, 2019

Choosing the right Orthotics for a child can be much more important than for an adult. A child’s orthotic will guide the proper growth of their feet for the rest of their lives and help with the proper alignment of the ankle, knees, hips and lower back, hopefully eliminating the need for one when they are older.

Of course, not all children’s feet will need an orthotic because their feet are growing. By age 5 or 6, if a child has not developed an arch or is having other problems, call your podiatrist. They will diagnose the problem and, if needed, make sure their feet are appropriately matched with the correct orthotic.

Common reasons for an orthotic include:

  • Over pronation – when your feet tilt inward. Can lead to shin splints, stress fractures and a collapsed arch.
  • Supination – when your feet tilt toward the outside. Can lead to stress fractures.
  • Flat feet – No arch.
  • High arch – Is not usually not supported in a regular shoe.

Each of the above conditions requires a different type of orthotic. The 3 main types are:

  • Rigid – controls the motion of the foot with some arch support
  • Semi-rigid – a less stiff orthotic that will provide more cushioning than a rigid orthotic yet provides good arch support
  • Soft or cushioned – an orthotic that provides cushioning and shock absorption

With supination and pronation usually comes some type of pain that will indicate a problem, but not all pain of course will be eliminated with an orthotic. Other unseen issues may be contributing to your child’s foot pain making it all the more important to make an appointment to see your podiatrist. 

If you believe your child may need an orthotic, or you have any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to make sure your child’s feet are corrected and back on track to a healthy, active and productive life. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
March 27, 2019

There is no better time to begin taking care of our feet than when we are a child. From the very beginning it is crucial our children maintain good foot health and knowing which problems are most likely to occur early on can help greatly. So, what are some of the more prevalent issues with our children’s feet? Good question.

As an infant, it is very important for children to be able to move and stretch their feet as their bones are growing. Undue pressure can damage this and can lead to much more serious problems later on. Also make sure that socks and shoes are not too tight. Don’t rush a child into walking. He or she will develop on their own according to their individual needs, but do keep an eye on their gait so if some type of intervention is needed, it can be addressed immediately.

It is not uncommon for children to inherit many of the same problems their parents have. These include:

  • Flat feet - Poor arch support can often be passed on to a child but can also be treated.
  • Heel problems – problems with the Achilles tendon can cause discomfort.
  • Pigeon toes – walking with your feet and toes pointed inward.
  • Knock knees – knees that touch each other as you walk can and often is treated with braces.
  • Bowlegs - a curvature of the legs which can be indicative of other more complex issues like Rickets caused by a lack of vitamin D and Blount’s disease or abnormal growth on the top of the tibia.

Indications your children may have foot issues can include:

  • Tired legs – this may indicate flat feet.
  • Difficulty in sports – not being able to compete may indicate issues with their feet and gait.
  • Tripping and falling – the inability to keep their balance.
  • Foot shyness – when a child doesn’t want anyone to see their feet for the fear of embarrassment.
  • Pain - pain is never a good sign and can indicate poor fitting shoes, bad bone development or other more serious conditions.

Early recognition is very important for our children’s foot health. If you believe your child may suffer from any of the above conditions or if you have any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
February 06, 2019

Your children grow up in what seems like a blink of the eye. They start to crawl, take their first steps, are running, and jumping, and before you know it, tying their own shoelaces! Then it’s off to college!

Okay, so it’s not quite that quick, but time sure can fly by. That’s why we want to encourage you to start teaching your children to take care of their feet early. Children are pretty perceptive and can learn by example starting from a young age. Take advantage of the years when they are soaking up knowledge and teach them some of the following ways to take care of their own feet:

  • Washing feet – This is a skill they can learn as they learn to wash their bodies during bath time. Have them reach their toes while they are sitting, and gently rub, rub, rub. Remind them to clean the tops and bottoms of their feet, as well as in between the toes and under the toenails. Teach them to properly dry their feet and moisturize if their skin is dry.
  • Wearing socks with shoes – Other than with sandals, teach them that they need to always wear socks before they put on their shoes. Children’s feet can get just as sweaty and stinky as our feet, so it’s important that they wear socks. That way, their shoes will not become stinky! Additionally, wearing shoes without socks can lead to blisters, corns, and calluses, which can be painful for your little one.
  • Understanding how their feet fit into shoes – As your children’s feet grow, observe their feet when they seem to either not put their shoes on, or want to take them off quickly. Look for any redness or swelling as these signs can indicate that shoes are too small. When you buy new shoes, have them try the shoes on and ask them if their toes have room to wiggle. Are the feet sliding around in the shoes? Do they feel snug or are they clunky? As they get older, they will recognize whether or not shoes fit them correctly.
  • Feeling out when they need to have their toenails trimmed – It’s not always easy to be on top of when your children need to have their toenails trimmed. When they are old enough, you can teach them to trim their own toenails, but before then, you’ll need to teach them an approximate length in which they should come to you for a trim. When the whites reach the edge of their toes, or when they feel the nails hit the top or front of their shoes (which can cause ingrown toenails) are both good times to trim toenails.
  • Foot exercises – Children generally get a lot of foot exercise from their general playtime. However, it doesn’t hurt to teach them some exercises by example. When watching TV together, you can help them with motor skills by doing foot circles or testing their ABCs in a silly way – draw them with your feet!

If you need tips on how to help your child with foot care, come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your child’s feet at New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute and find the best treatment for any concern you may have for your child’s feet. Make an appointment at our Clark, NJ office so we can keep your child walking.



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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470