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1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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Posts for category: Foot Pain

By Clark Podiatry Cente
December 07, 2020
Category: Foot Pain

December is here, and we will soon be welcoming 2021.  At Clark Podiatry Center, we’re encouraging our patients to make time for their feet and ankles this month. It’s time to address ongoing issues or new symptoms. Now is not the time to ignore your discomfort and bring it into the next year.

We’re here to help you keep walking. Here are three types of pain to consider as you set a date for your next appointment:
 

1. Persistent Foot Pain

Walking in pain every day can be discouraging, but there is hope. If you have persistent heel or ankle pain, we’re here to help. It’s our job to provide the right diagnosis and create a treatment plan. Don’t get complacent with your discomfort. Check-in often with your podiatrist.

2. New Foot Pain

What’s changed? If you’re noticing new signs of discomfort, start taking notes, and make an appointment with your podiatrist. Ignore the myth that pain is normal or that it will eventually go away. Instead, have confidence about treating your body by receiving a diagnosis from a foot and ankle specialist.

3. Returning Foot Pain

If it has been a long time since you have had foot pain, you know exactly how it feels when it returns. Call your podiatrist to make an appointment. Returning symptoms could be the sign of a reinjury or another condition. To keep you walking, we want to know about any discomfort that you experience. Let us know exactly how you feel, including when you noticed returning symptoms.

Temporary relief is helpful, but it doesn’t resolve the problem. With a correct diagnosis and treatment plan, we can find the root cause to prevent future issues. If you notice any pain — persistent, new, or returning — call us at (732) 382-3470 or schedule an appointment online with Dr. Brandon A. Macy, a board-certified podiatrist. The New Jersey Children’s Foot Health Institute is also part of Clark Podiatry Center. We want to remind our patients that children should not have foot pain either.

With fall on its way, some new sports will soon come into season. Long-distance running, football, soccer, and basketball are all sports which at one time or another may cause the athlete to put a lot of weight on their feet and can cause a fracture. Often associated with falls, twisting or a high impact of a foot against a hard surface, a fracture of one of the foot bones is, unfortunately, more common than expected. 

What is a fracture? A fracture is another term for a broken bone and is usually very painful. If you are experiencing serious foot pain after falling unusually or abnormally twisting them, you will want to contact your podiatrist. They will immediately take an x-ray to determine if you have a fractured or broken foot.

Symptoms can include:

  • Severe pain – pain in your foot will be severe especially if you try to walk on it
  • Bruising – broken bones or fractures can often come with a bruise
  • Swelling – as a defense mechanism the body tries to create a natural ‘caste’ for the area thereby causing swelling

Home treatments include:

  • Splints – even the application of a pillow wrapped around the foot may help
  • Ice – the application of ice will help reduce swelling
  • Elevation – keeping your feet up will reduce the blood flow to the area and help reduce pain
  • Pain medicine – Tylenol or other types of pain relievers can also help. Make sure to use only as directed as overuse can seriously damage organs

Of course, the above treatments are short term until you get to your doctor. Your podiatrist will take x-rays and determine the next steps for treatment. They can include:

  • Crutches – used to help keep pressure off the foot while it heals
  • Flat bottomed shoes – in less extreme cases, flat bottomed shoes serve as a less dramatic ‘caste’ for healing
  • Castes and splints – open toed are more long term and provide for stabilizing the foot for healing
  • Surgery – used in more dramatic cases, surgery may be needed to remove the damaged bone or insert metal supports for proper growth and healing
  • No weight bearing – your feet must be allowed to heal on its own without pressure or impact

Recovery time could be weeks or months.

If you believe you or your child may be suffering from a foot fracture or if you have any other foot concerns, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the most appropriate treatment for your condition. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
May 29, 2019
Category: Foot Pain

There are many things that can cause pain in your feet. One is called a Neuroma. A Neuroma is the thickening of the skin and irritation of a nerve between your toes. Neuromas can affect the ball of your feet and is usually found between your 3rd and 4th toes. This is also called Morton’s Neuroma.

Symptoms of a Neuroma include:

  • Feeling like you have a pebble in your footwear
  • Sharp, burning pain in your feet especially between your toes
  • Toes may feel numb

Risk factors for a Neuroma include:

  • High heel footwear – can put undue pressure on your toes and ball of your feet
  • High impact sports – jogging, running, basketball and/or gymnastics
  • Inherited or other foot issues – bunions, hammertoes, flat feet or high arches

Home treatments can include:

  • Ice – 15 minutes on and off for several hours to reduce pain
  • Anti-inflammatory meds – Tylenol. Make sure you take them only as directed.
  • Better fitting footwear – that do not put undue pressure on your toes or ball of the foot
  • Reducing or stopping the aggravating activity – take a break from running or basketball for awhile

It is very important to see you podiatrist if you think you are developing a Neuroma. Your podiatrist can treat the condition in the following ways:

  • Use specifically designed orthotic – your podiatrist can recommend which one is best for you
  • Inject steroids to alleviate the pain
  • Surgery – a cutting and thereby loosening of the ligament around the affected area
  • Surgery – the removal of the affected nerve. This can, however, result in permanent numbness
  • Injections of something called sclerosing alcohol. This treatment has seen some positive results, but not in all cases. Your podiatrist is the best person to decide.   

Do you suspect you have a Neuroma or have any other foot concerns,  schedule an appointment with Clark Podiatry Center  at 732-382-3470 to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon A. Macy who is  associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute . Come see us at our Clark, New Jersey office today!

By Clark Podiatry Center
May 08, 2019
Category: Foot Pain

When it comes to having healthy feet, besides regularly seeing your podiatrist, you may want to take a few minutes to give them a good massage. This would be especially rewarding after a long day at work or athletic activity. You don’t have to be a professional masseuse to make your feet feel better. This you can do on your own and in your home.

You can break foot massages down into two categories:

  • Wet Massage – massaging your feet after you’ve soaked your feet in a combination of warm water and Epsom salt for about 20 minutes.
  • Dry Massage – Massaging your feet without soaking in warm water.

While you can massage your feet without a good soak, soaking will loosen up the muscles and help alleviate any pain you may be suffering. Make sure you dry your feet well before massaging though.

How to Give a good foot massage:

  • Start by rubbing the soles of your feet.
  • Focus on anything that feels tight or feels good when you rub.
  • Rub from your heel to the ball of the foot.
  • Stretch out your toes and ankles but wiggling them back and forth.
  • Rub the tops, sides and bottom of your toes to get the blood flowing.
  • Squeeze your heel and top side of your foot. Work to loosen the muscle and improve blood flow.
  • Also remember to rub the muscles in your arch.  
  • Focus on the bones of the foot by rubbing between them with a firm circular motion.
  • Repeat the above for any areas that felt especially good.

This is also a good time for a ‘foot checkup’ checking for corns, calluses, bunions, areas of soreness, trimming of nails or other concerns etc.  When finished, feel free to rub in skin lotion or powdered corn silk.

If you have foot concerns or just want to ask questions about your feet, please make an appointment with us. Dr. Brandon A. Macy, who is associated with New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute, will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Clark Podiatry at (732) 382-3470.

By Clark Podiatry Center
August 22, 2018
Category: Foot Pain
Tags: Bunions   Flat Feet   Hammertoes   Neuroma   Shoes   injury   orthotic   dancing  

A neuroma is a condition in which the tissue around a nerve becomes thickened.

You might have a neuroma in your foot if you:

  • feel like you want to remove a small stone that you keep stepping on, but when you take your shoes off, it’s never there.
  • feel like you have a pinched nerve in the ball of your foot.
  • have burning pain, numbness, or tingling between the third and fourth toes.

A neuroma in your foot is called Morton’s Neuroma and it’s usually caused by inflammation, irritation or injury. Repetitive motions with high pressure on the balls of the feet can cause chronic inflammation on the soft tissues near the nerve. This can include wearing shoes with high heels and/or narrow toe boxes for long periods of time. Participating in activities like dancing or sports that involve running, sprinting, or jumping are also likely culprits. Additionally, if you injure the foot by dropping something on it or stepping hard on a pointed object, it can cause a prolonged inflammation in that nerve.

Some foot deformities can also put you at higher risk of developing symptoms of Morton’s Neuroma. Hammertoes, bunions, flat feet, or very high arches can all shift your body weight so that the ball of the foot has to unevenly bear more weight. 

Once symptoms set in, it’s important to rest the foot and reduce inflammation and pain to prevent worsening and ongoing symptoms. Using orthotic inserts, applying ice, massaging the foot, and/or anti-inflammatory drugs may help you feel better. You may also consider how your shoes might be affecting the way your feet feel on a day-to-day basis. If they are too tight, your toes might need more room to relax throughout the day. If you don’t have enough arch support or cushioning, the balls of your feet might have to strain more.

If conservative at-home treatments and adjusting your shoes do not help, our podiatrist might use cortisone injections or sclerosing alcohol injections to relieve pain. At worst case scenario, the nerve may need to be surgically removed.

Don’t suffer from Morton’s Neuroma! We can help you feel better! Make an appointment today at Clark Podiatry Center. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will assess your feet to find the best treatments or solutions for your feet. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all the surrounding Union County towns!



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Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470