732-382-3470
 

Find Us

Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Archive:

Tags

Categories:

Have a question? Find answers and other helpful topics in our digital library.

 

   

  

Posts for category: Foot Care, Common Foot Conditions

By Clark Podiatry Center
February 07, 2018
Tags: corns   calluses   hammertoe  

Can’t you just get out the root?” is a regular question patients ask when they return for a 2nd, 3rd, 4 visit (or more) over time to relieve their painful corns and calluses. Unfortunately, corns and calluses don’t work that way and there’s a reason for that.  Let’s get to the “root” of the matter.

First, there is no difference between a corn and a callus.  They are more descriptive terms for thickening of the outer layer of the skin in spots due to an excessive amount of pressure and friction on a given spot.  Corns are typically on the toes, calluses elsewhere on the foot. They often become painful due to their bulk, much like if you had a pebble stuck in your shoe.

The underlying cause is a bony deformity—a hammertoe deformity for corns or an imbalance of the metatarsals in the ball of the foot for calluses.  These issues are largely determined by how your feet were built by your parents and how they developed as a result.  The corns and calluses are the results of these deformities, not independent growths, as would be the case if there was a wart present. Occasionally, the corn or callus will have a deep spot in the center which some people think is a root, but is actually just the focus point of the pressure and is thicker than the rest of the lesion.

Initial symptomatic treatment involves carefully paring down the corn or callus, which relieves pain and that is enough for many people. Padding or cushioning help even more. Wearing well-fitting comfortable shoes is also advisable.  Although shoes don’t really cause corns and calluses--they will make the best (or worst) out of the given situation.

Often we’ll recommend orthotics to go in your shoes with accommodations to relieve pressure from calluses. In the more severe cases, symptomatic treatment just isn’t enough and the only way to deal with it is to address the underlying foot deformity by correcting it surgically.

The takeaway point is this:  corns and calluses are symptoms of foot deformities. Treating the symptoms alone will get you temporary relief, which can be OK.  But if you want to prevent them from returning, you need to address the deformity. That is the only way to get at the REAL root of the problem.

For more information or an appointment, contact us at 732-382-3470 or visit our website at www.clarkpodiatry.com.  At Clark Podiatry Center, we want to keep you walking!

#ClarkPodiatryCenter #Calluses #Corns #Footpain

By Clark Podiatry Center
December 18, 2017

When it comes to women’s foot problems, both genetics and fashion play major roles. It also accounts for why women seem to have more foot and ankles issues than men do. One such problem that affects women more than men is Haglund’s Deformity, also known as retrocalcaneal bursitis.

Commonly called “pump bump”, it is a condition characterized by a painful enlargement of the back of the heel bone. The irritation caused on the back of the heel bone results in a bony growth, which in turn can also cause inflammation of the bursa (fluid-filled sac meant to cushion against friction bones or joints). It can cause redness, pain, and swelling at the back of the heel.

Those with high arches, tight Achilles tendons, and/or a tendency to walk on the outside of the heel are more likely to develop this deformity. Shoes with a rigid back, like those in pumps (high heels, no strap, and cupped heels) can cause further irritation on the back of the heel. It’s often accompanied by blisters from where the shoe repeatedly rubs on the back of the heel.

Treatment options:

  • Heel pads, whether it be over-the-counter or custom orthotics, can help to reduce irritation to the back of the heel. Other inserts can also help to correct your gait or add support for high arches or a tight Achilles tendon.
  • Our podiatrist may also suggest topical or oral anti-inflammatory medications for relief as you get the symptoms under control.
  • Physical therapy might also be helpful to loosen tight heel cords.
  • If the symptoms are severe, our podiatrist might recommend immobilization in a brace or cast until symptoms subside.

If after you have tried non-surgical treatments and you are still suffering, or if an X-ray shows significant bony growth, our podiatrist may suggest surgery. However, this requires extensive recovery efforts, so it would be a last resort. Come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy to receive an assessment of your heel pain. Make an appointment today at Clark Podiatry Center to see us at our Clark, NJ office. We keep you walking.

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
July 27, 2016
Tags: cracked heels   dry feet  

Summer footwear sometimes leaves you with dry, cracked skin on your feet, especially around the heels. The extra exposure to the elements from sandals and flip flops cause this issue, but most of the time, with a little bit of TLC, this problem can be taken care of easily.

Superficial dry, cracked skin on the feet can be treated at home. However, when the cracks are deep and infected or bleeding, it is a more serious issue and needs the attention of our podiatrist. Please call our team at Clark Podiatry Center where our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy will provide the podiatric care your family needs.

For those with dry, cracked skin on the surface of the feet, the following are some home remedies for preventing and reducing the problem. 

  1. Hydration: make sure you and your children drink plenty of water so that your overall body has enough to nourish all of your skin.

  2. Creams: Use a thick cream to spread onto your feet. Socks or keeping your feet up for a while will be recommended to prevent slipping and falling after applying the creams.

  3. Pumice Stone: Use one to scrub off the dead skin cells after a warm foot soak.

  4. Antibacterial Soap: Will help to prevent or treat infections.

  5. Paraffin Wax: This covers the feet and helps to retain moisture in the skin.

  6. Epsom salt or Honey: Adding these to baths or soaks will also help to heal and moisturize.

  7. Apple cider vinegar or lemon juice: Apply directly to the dry, cracked areas as it will soften the skin.

  8. Rotate in some walking shoes or sneakers so that your feet are not always exposed to the air.

Some dry skin may persist even when treating at home. You can make an appointment with us at the Clark, NJ office by calling (732) 382-3470. Dr. Macy and his team will provide excellent care for your family’s adult and pediatric podiatry needs.

Don’t forget! The Grand Opening for the New Jersey Children’s Foot Health Institute is on July 30th, where we will offer a free foot screening for your children!



Questions or Comments?
We encourage you to contact us whenever you have an interest or concern about our services.

Call Today 732-382-3470

1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470