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Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

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By Clark Podiatry Center
February 13, 2019
Category: Shoes
Tags: blisters   calluses   ingrown toenails   overpronation   Running   injury   fit  

Gearing up to participate in a running event is no simple task. If you want to do your best, you’ll want to start training months in advance, especially if you are running a long race. Additionally, you’ll want the best gear to support you and keep you safe from injury.

What gear could we mean? Your running shoes, of course! To keep your feet supported and as comfortable as possible during your training and the actual race, look for the following features when choosing your running shoes:

  • Shoes designed for running – While cross-trainers and other athletic shoes could work, running shoes are designed with running in mind.
  • Fit – Make sure that the shoes fit the feet well. They shouldn’t be too big or too small as that can also cause problems.
  • Lots of cushion – The repetitive impact you encounter while running can impact your feet, ankles, knees, and hips. This can cause pain while you run, which can limit your performance.
  • Arch and heel support – The arches will be working hard to keep your entire foot engaged. If the arches become tired, they may flatten out, which can cause you pain toward the end of your race and for days after. Additionally, the heels need to be planted in heel cups so that they don’t slide about in the shoes, causing instability.
  • Firm heel counter – A firm heel counter will increase support in the shoes. It will help prevent overpronation (straining the arches) and keep the feet stabilized in the shoes.
  • Good outer sole grip – You’ll most likely be running outdoors during these events, so you’ll want shoes that have a good grip on the outer soles. At any point, if there are slippery or slick surfaces, it can create instability for your feet while you run if you don’t have good or enough tread.
  • Breathable material that supports and flexes at appropriate points – When you check the shoes and take it for a test run, make sure that your feet are not overheating. This is a sign that your shoes are not breathable and can cause you to excessively sweat. That will make perfect conditions to cause foot issues like foot odor, blisters, and calluses.

As you prepare, make sure you keep good hygiene, trim your toenails properly (to prevent ingrown toenails), and stretch your feet and ankles before and after each run. If you experience an injury, it’s important to rest and recover, rather than continuing to train on it.

If you experience foot pain while you are training, see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet and find the best treatment for any concern you may have. Make an appointment at our Clark, NJ office so we can keep you walking (or running!).

By Clark Podiatry Center
February 06, 2019

Your children grow up in what seems like a blink of the eye. They start to crawl, take their first steps, are running, and jumping, and before you know it, tying their own shoelaces! Then it’s off to college!

Okay, so it’s not quite that quick, but time sure can fly by. That’s why we want to encourage you to start teaching your children to take care of their feet early. Children are pretty perceptive and can learn by example starting from a young age. Take advantage of the years when they are soaking up knowledge and teach them some of the following ways to take care of their own feet:

  • Washing feet – This is a skill they can learn as they learn to wash their bodies during bath time. Have them reach their toes while they are sitting, and gently rub, rub, rub. Remind them to clean the tops and bottoms of their feet, as well as in between the toes and under the toenails. Teach them to properly dry their feet and moisturize if their skin is dry.
  • Wearing socks with shoes – Other than with sandals, teach them that they need to always wear socks before they put on their shoes. Children’s feet can get just as sweaty and stinky as our feet, so it’s important that they wear socks. That way, their shoes will not become stinky! Additionally, wearing shoes without socks can lead to blisters, corns, and calluses, which can be painful for your little one.
  • Understanding how their feet fit into shoes – As your children’s feet grow, observe their feet when they seem to either not put their shoes on, or want to take them off quickly. Look for any redness or swelling as these signs can indicate that shoes are too small. When you buy new shoes, have them try the shoes on and ask them if their toes have room to wiggle. Are the feet sliding around in the shoes? Do they feel snug or are they clunky? As they get older, they will recognize whether or not shoes fit them correctly.
  • Feeling out when they need to have their toenails trimmed – It’s not always easy to be on top of when your children need to have their toenails trimmed. When they are old enough, you can teach them to trim their own toenails, but before then, you’ll need to teach them an approximate length in which they should come to you for a trim. When the whites reach the edge of their toes, or when they feel the nails hit the top or front of their shoes (which can cause ingrown toenails) are both good times to trim toenails.
  • Foot exercises – Children generally get a lot of foot exercise from their general playtime. However, it doesn’t hurt to teach them some exercises by example. When watching TV together, you can help them with motor skills by doing foot circles or testing their ABCs in a silly way – draw them with your feet!

If you need tips on how to help your child with foot care, come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your child’s feet at New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute and find the best treatment for any concern you may have for your child’s feet. Make an appointment at our Clark, NJ office so we can keep your child walking.

By Clark Podiatry Center
January 30, 2019

Ever since the day you brought them home from the hospital, you’ve probably thought that every part of your child is precious – from the strands of hair at the top of his/her head to the tickly bottoms of his/her feet. One of the most dreaded acts you had to perform was probably cutting the fingernails and toenails without accidentally drawing blood!

Today, we’ll talk about those cute toenails you cared for. Let’s start by saying that children’s toenail problems are not very common. However, there are a few things you should know about possible problems they can encounter.

  1. For one, if your child has toe deformities, they are more at risk of having toenail issues. The combination of toe shape, tightness of shoes, and toe grooming habits (which you may be in charge of) can lead to problems like ingrown toenails. To lower the risk of this painful issue, make sure your child’s toenails are cut straight across and not too short.
  2. You may consider fungal toenails an adult foot problem, but children are also susceptible. After all, some children do go to the same areas where fungal infections are easily spread, such as community pools, and gym locker rooms with their parents. It can even spread at home – by sharing a foot towel with a parent or sibling who is already infected.
  3. Some overall health issues will manifest as toenail problems. Autoimmune diseases or viral infections can lead to toenails separating from the nail bed and possibly even fall off.
  4. Spots, lines, or indentations in the nails can indicate a lapse in nutrition (like low zinc or iron), a period of sickness (fever), or slight trauma from repeatedly dropping something on the foot or kicking something (such as the front of a tight shoe).

Again, these problems are pretty rare, but they can happen. Practicing good hygiene, grooming correctly, having a nutritious diet, and ensuring a good fit in shoes will help to prevent these problems. If you suspect something is going on with your child’s toenails, come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your child’s feet at New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute and find the best treatment for toenail problems. Make an appointment at our Clark, NJ office so we can keep your child walking.

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
January 23, 2019
Category: Exercise
Tags: stretch   workout   walk   comfortable shoes  

Have you been keeping up with your New Year’s Resolutions to be healthier this year? One way you can do that is to stay active and eat nutritious foods!

You might argue that:

  • You don’t have enough time to fit in a gym workout every day.
  • You’re too tired to exercise after a long day and commute home.
  • You lack the motivation to keep up an exercise routine.

Well, we are here to help you remedy that! We’ve got many ideas on how you can increase your physical activity where you spend many hours in your day. That’s right, you can add to your step count right at work!

Here are some sneaky ways to increase your energy output, where you might normally feel like you’re at an idle desk job:

  • Park at the other end of the parking lot, or get off the bus or subway one or two stops earlier.
  • Schedule water breaks. Set an alarm every hour (or more often if you plan to drink smaller amounts) to get a cup of water. Not only will you be sitting less all day, but you’ll also increase your step count AND meet your daily hydration goals. As an added bonus, the increased water intake will also prompt you to take more bathroom breaks as well! (Hint: take the long way to the kitchen or bathroom!)
  • Walk during your lunch. Pick up food at a restaurant down the street, make some phone calls as you walk, run an errand, or just take a walk at a nearby park during your lunch break. If you plan well enough, you may be able to eat while you work, so that your lunch break can be better utilized. (Hint: form a walking group and bring comfortable walking shoes to wear during your longer walks).
  • Carry your “instant” message to your coworker instead of sending a chat or ping. That may sound so foreign and inefficient, but that’s not the goal here. Our goal is to add steps, remember? Bonus points if your coworker is not on the same floor with you and you take the stairs rather than the elevator.
  • Stand up, stretch, and walk in place every 30 minutes to an hour. This will help increase your circulation and encourage an energy spike. Your posture will probably benefit too!

All of these little tricks can help you increase your activity and help you stay focused and alert! It’s a win-win situation at work!

If getting up so often is not appealing or might be distracting to co-workers or your boss, get some exercise by doing some toe exercises under the desk. If nothing else, it will help you strengthen your feet, ankles, and toes, as well as increase circulation. It’s especially important if you’re prone to swollen feet if you stay sitting for a long time. (We’re hinting at you, pregnant ladies!)

By Clark Podiatry Center
January 16, 2019

Congratulations! You have a little one on the way, and so you might be wondering all about how to care for him or her. There’s a lot to consider, like feeding, bathing, sleeping, swaddling, and of course, changing diapers. Getting all of those things figured out is not easy, and your mind might be swirling.

Just take one thing at a time, and you’ll be just fine!

Right after your baby is born, one of the first things you might want to do is to count the fingers and toes, to make sure you’ve got 10 of each. Your doctor will do the same to make sure the baby has no major problems. Just so that you are aware, after the exhaustion of giving birth, your care team will examine the following about your newborn’s feet:

  • Count the toes – Sometimes, babies can be born with 6 toes on one or both of the feet called polydactyly. Don’t worry though it can be easily treated by a simple surgical removal from the foot. Then, the child’s foot/feet will begin to develop normally, with 5 toes.
  • Check the toes – Some children can be born with webbed toes. They can be surgically corrected during infancy, or if there are no developmental problems, can be left alone.
  • Tickle the feet – The doctor will tickle the feet to make sure the nerves are functioning properly. When the feet are tickled, they should play.
  • Check the shape of the feet – If the feet and toes seem to point forward, the baby will likely have normal development. However, if the foot has more of a “C” shape, this is called metatarsus adductus. It can cause pigeon-toeing and difficulty fitting into shoes properly, depending on the severity of the deformity. Stretching and plastering starting from infancy will help correct the shape.
  • Check the angle of the feet – Depending on genetics or how much room the baby has in the womb, the feet can look like they are turned inward. With this condition, called clubfoot, the outer part and front part of the ankle is overstretched. Don’t worry too much though. Treatment can begin right after birth, while the bones are still soft. Doctors will stretch and cast the foot so that it develops more and more toward the proper position. Special orthotics can be used when the baby starts to walk in order to keep the position correct.
  • Check the ankles, knees, and hips – This is to ensure that their legs are not dislocated during the birthing process. Dislocation can cause the baby severe discomfort and abnormal development.

If your baby was born with normal feet, that’s great news! But if you’ve been informed about foot problems from birth, don’t worry, we can help! After initial care at the hospital, continued care can be sought at our office. Come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute of Clark Podiatry Center. He can assess your feet, and find the best treatment for your baby’s foot needs. Make an appointment at our Clark, NJ office so we can keep you walking.

 





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Call Today 732-382-3470

1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470