732-382-3470
 

Find Us

Dr. Brandon Macy
Podiatrist - Clark, NJ
1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Archive:

Tags

Categories:

Have a question? Find answers and other helpful topics in our digital library.

 

   

  

By Clark Podiatry Center
October 16, 2018
Category: bone health
Tags: Fractures   osteoporosis   vitamin D   calcium  

For Bone and Joint Action Week (Oct. 12th-20th) we thought it might be a good time to talk about how osteoporosis can affect your feet and ankles. After all, your feet have 26 bones each!

As you get older, your bones begin to absorb calcium at a slower rate. For those who experience calcium loss at a faster rate than its absorption, it’s likely that osteoporosis is playing a part. This is a disease that might have many different causes and risk factors, such as genetics, hormone changes, excessive drinking, or smoking.

What can be done?

The best way to reduce the risk of suffering from osteoporosis is to get enough calcium and vitamin D, as well as to perform weight-bearing exercises when you are young. The weights increase resistance and compacts the bones to make them stronger.

However, if you already have an osteoporosis diagnosis, there are medications that could be effective in stopping or slowing the rate of calcium loss. There might be some drugs that could even help re-build bones.

When your feet suffer from osteoporosis:

  • Your foot can easily suffer from stress fractures or broken toes. (This can actually be the first sign of osteoporosis in your bones.)
  • You can experience bone pain, especially at the tops and sides of the feet.
  • You might get a fracture or broken bone from the smallest injury or high impact activity (like jumping or tripping).

Since osteoporosis can be hereditary, find out if it runs in your family. If it does, you might want to have a bone evaluation. Additionally, if you have received a diagnosis, you may need custom prescription shoes. Orthotics might be the answer for your foot support needs. Come to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy to be sure. Make an appointment today at the Clark Podiatry Center. You’ll receive the best treatments and foot care tips at our Clark, NJ office, which serves the surrounding Union County areas. We keep you walking!

 

By Clark Podiatry Center
October 11, 2018
Tags: blisters   Shoes   foot problems   toe walking   in-toeing   out-toeing   ingrown  

She loves to take walks but recently seems to want to stop earlier than before. She doesn’t seem to want to put shoes on and fights you when you try to convince her that she needs them.

He is usually running around and forcing you to play “catch the toddler” but lately, he doesn’t even want to walk. Instead, he wants you to carry him everywhere.

What might be going on?

Your toddler might not be able to properly express that he or she is feeling foot discomfort. Instead, you might hear whining or frustration.

The foot problems can be congenital (from birth), developmental, or even due to ill-fitting shoes. Check the following for signs that point to foot problems as the source of unexplained crankiness:

  • Resisting putting shoes on: This could mean that the shoes are uncomfortable. Make sure they are wearing the right size and make sure they have socks on with closed-toed shoes. After wearing shoes, do their feet have redness or blisters?
  • Toe and Toenail problems: Are the toenail beds inflamed? Are the toenails cracked? You might be cutting their toenails too short (making them ingrown), or you may not be cutting them often enough.
  • Walking abnormalities: If they seem to be walking abnormally, such as in-toeing or out-toeing, tripping often, or toe-walking, they may have foot problems. They can be traits that are inherited or developmental problems.
  • Limping or uneven stance: After an injury, your child might walk with a limp for a bit. However, if it seems to be a severe limp or a limp that lasts more than a few days, it’s important to have it checked out.

If your child is complaining of foot pain, come in for an assessment with our friendly board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy. Make an appointment today at the New Jersey Children's Foot Health Institute at the Clark Podiatry Center. Your children will get the best treatments and foot care tips at our Clark, NJ office, which serves the surrounding Union County areas. We keep you walking!

By Clark Podiatry Center
October 02, 2018
Category: Pregnancy

During pregnancy, many things change. Your body reacts to the internal and external environment differently. And as the body begins to prepare for the last few months of pregnancy and giving birth, it retains more fluids and even allows for bones to shift. It’s amazing what the body is capable of doing!

Here’s what to look for during pregnancy, for baby and mama’s feet.

Baby’s Feet:

  • Feet will begin to form with separated toes at about 10 weeks
  • They will use the feet to help them move and explore the amniotic sac
  • Closer to the end of the pregnancy, toe or foot deformities can be detected, such as clubfoot, overlapping toes, amniotic band syndrome, or polydactyly. Don’t worry though, as these are not common occurrences.

Speak to our podiatrist at Clark Podiatry Center if you have concerns about your baby’s foot development in the womb.

Mother’s Feet:

  • Water retention and natural weight gain will cause edema. The swelling can cause discomfort in the feet and even change sensation.
  • The extra weight that the mother carries can flatten the arches and cause the ankles to roll inward, as with overpronation. Over time, this can cause chronic issues like plantar fasciitis and/or Achilles tendonitis.
  • Cramping can occur in the feet and/or legs as part of pregnancy. The exact cause is unknown but stretching, walking, hydration, and comfortable footwear can help prevent cramps.
  • As the feet change, pressure points can change as well. Pain can occur in the heel, arch, or balls of feet as a consequence of problems like edema and overpronation.

To find relief from these symptoms and changes, try some of the following:

  • Rest often so that your feet do not have to overwork. Schedule in times to rest.
  • Use compression socks and elevate your feet to reduce swelling.
  • Wear comfortable shoes with good supportive features and cushioning.
  • Stay active to increase circulation of fluids back up from your feet and ankles, and to prevent cramping.

If you notice that your feet are swelling unevenly or excessively, you might have a clot. Get medical care immediately. With other mild concerns, come to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy for an assessment throughout your pregnancy. Make an appointment today to have your feet treated with care. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all of Union County! We keep you walking!

By Clark Podiatry Center
September 26, 2018
Category: arthritis

Your feet and ankles each have 33 joints that allow you to move about freely. Curling and pointing your toes, standing on your tip toes, as well as walking or running in different directions are all doable thanks to those joints. But a diagnosis of arthritis can change all that. Once arthritis sets in, your joints can become stiff and painful. You can have days of severe inflammation, where you can barely move around, even in your own home.

That’s why we’ve come up with some tips to make it easier to live with arthritis in the feet:

  • Physical therapy and Foot Exercises: It may seem counterintuitive to exercise the feet, but it’s actually very helpful to perform low-impact exercises. Especially for those with gouty arthritis, exercise can help prevent uric acid buildup, which can cause a painful gout attack. Flexibility and mobility exercises like stretching and swimming can reduce the risk of painful inflammation on tendons and ligaments in the joints.
  • Wear supportive shoes. A lot of cushioning can help reduce the impact on the joints. Additionally, you can use orthotic inserts to add padding to joints that are particularly painful (e.g. big toe joint or back of the heel).
  • Orthotics. During your podiatry assessment, Dr. Macy might recommend custom orthotics for your feet, depending on how arthritis is affecting you.
  • Reduce or eliminate high-impact activities. The more high-impact activities (e.g. basketball, football, running) that you participate in, the more likely you are to experience inflammation around your joints (which absorb that impact). This can worsen symptoms, so look to alternative exercises and activities to stay physically active.
  • Schedule in periods of rest. Sometimes, life seems to be about “go, go, go”. However, schedule in periods of rest so that your joints can recover in between periods of walking or standing to reduce the risk of arthritis flare-ups.
  • Make your home more comfortable. Use cushioned mats around the house, wherever you’ll be standing around. For examples, in front of sinks, the oven, and counters where you might prepare food.
  • Eat nutritiously and maintain a healthy weight. Anti-inflammatory foods are a must and the less weight that your joints have to support, the better for preventing inflammation.
  • Reduce stress. Stress tends to make inflammation worse in your body. Find ways to reduce stress, such as meditation and getting foot massages.

Take good care of your arthritic feet! If you’ve been experiencing joint pain in the feet, come in for an assessment! We can help you determine how you can best treat your condition. Make an appointment to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy at Clark Podiatry Center. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all of Union County! We keep you walking!

By Clark Podiatry Center
September 18, 2018
Category: Toenail problems

The summer might be coming to a close, but that doesn’t mean you should ignore your toenails! On the contrary, now that you might be wearing more closed-toed shoes with socks, you might be at more of a risk for fungal problems.

Today’s focus is on how fungal growth can mean infections on the toenails. Toenail fungus, also called onychomycosis, is caused by the same family of fungus (tinea) that causes Athlete’s Foot and Ringworm. When the fungus affects the toenails, they can become brittle, discolored, and or thick.

Where do I get fungal toenails?

  • The gym – A common place of contagion is a gym locker room with showers. The damp and warm environment allows the fungus to thrive, making it easy to transfer from person to person when each is barefoot. (Use flip-flops at the gym!)
  • Your family member – If someone in your family has foot fungus or fungal toenails, it can spread via shared towels or showers that do not fully dry between uses.
  • Your roommate – Similarly, if you have a roommate with whom you share a bathroom, you can become infected via shared towels or showers.
  • The community pool – While the chlorine does its best to disinfect and reduce microorganism growth, most people have moments of being barefoot between the pool and the locker room. Foot fungus thrives in moisture associated with pool areas.

Wearing closed-toed shoes, especially if you wear them every day, can also be the culprit of a fungal infection. In the fall and winter, your feet are warm inside the shoes. Those who sweat in closed-toed shoes create the perfect environment for fungus to grow. When opportunity strikes, the microorganism can infect the skin and toenails.

How do I get rid of these unsightly fungal toenails?

Depending on the severity of the fungal toenails, Dr. Macy might suggest:

  • Antifungal creams or lotions directly to the nails.
  • Medicated nail polish: The prescribed nail polish has an antifungal in it and should be used once daily.
  • Oral antifungal medication if your infection sites are throughout the body. 
  • Laser Therapy: This is a low risk, painless treatment, which kills the fungus living in the toenails. As your nails grow out, it should grow without the fungal symptoms. Our office also has Keryflex available to cosmetically restore any damaged toenails, especially as you wait for your own nails to grow out.

Are your fungal toenails causing you embarrassment? Do you want to be free of unsightly toenails? Come to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brandon Macy for an assessment. Make an appointment today to be rid of those fungal toenails. We are located in Clark, NJ and serve patients in all of Union County! We keep you walking!

 





This website includes materials that are protected by copyright, or other proprietary rights. Transmission or reproduction of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use, as defined in the copyright laws, requires the written permission of the copyright owners.

Questions or Comments?
We encourage you to contact us whenever you have an interest or concern about our services.

Call Today 732-382-3470

1114 Raritan Road
Clark, NJ 07066

Podiatrist - Clark, Dr. Brandon Macy, 1114 Raritan Road, Clark NJ, 07066 732-382-3470